Washington Post's Scores

For 1,054 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 10.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Once Upon a Time: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Ten Commandments
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 439
  2. Negative: 0 out of 439
439 tv reviews
  1. Cristela resembles past attempts to graft multiculturalism onto the vanilla-fied vapidness of the American sitcom format. But Cristela wins the day with its easygoing attitude and superbly smooth cast. Alonzo has a bite to her wit that is reminiscent of the earliest, best days of “Roseanne.”
  2. “House” comparisons will surely abound, but Rake is easily one of the more confident network dramas to come our way of late.
  3. The cast is terrific, and some of the lines are screamingly funny, but there’s also an empathetic, moral undercurrent to the story--the usual cautionary tale about having all your dreams come true.
  4. The pilot (the only episode made available to critics at press time) has some difficult scenes, including an act of marital rape (or something like it), yet the acting is strong and the story is compulsively intriguing. The first thing you want from The Affair is to see where it leads.
  5. Although Jane the Virgin could easily devolve into a frenetic sendup of telenovela cheesiness, it is a remarkably sure-footed, enjoyable dramedy full of strong performances, particularly from Rodriguez.
  6. It's a beautiful downer of a show that becomes more revealing and absorbing as it moves along.
  7. Overdoing things is one of Murphy's trademark flaws, but this show has a captivating style and giddy gross-outs.
  8. "The Knights of Prosperity" is knee-slappingly and side-splittingly funny stuff, or as close to that as TV gets these days.
  9. It is a happy, sweet surprise, much more humane than almost any of the teen-age comedies that have broken out like acne on the movie screens of the nation during what seems like an interminable cinematic puberty. [5 Mar 1986, p.D1]
    • Washington Post
  10. The show delivers on an exceedingly intriguing premise, with some of the most beguilingly morose performances delivered this year. It’s a strange but good wallow.
  11. A new limited-run series from HBO that is engaging, charming and intoxicating entirely on its own.
  12. The film is made skillfully enough that it could conceivably captivate both the most obsessive baseball fan and somebody who doesn't give a hoot but has a healthy curiosity--and the gratuitous extra minutes aren't by any means intolerable.
  13. Review is one of Comedy Central’s most effortless and truly funny new shows in a while.
  14. An engaging, hour-long documentary.
  15. The Walking Dead can still surprise us that way. And that's one of the reasons why we must keep watching.
  16. The casting, like the writing and direction, is impeccable, and includes Eve Best as Jackie's doctor friend Eleanor; Peter Facinelli as cute but semi-competent ER physician Fitch "Coop" Cooper; Merritt Wever as a bleeding-heart novice; and Haaz Sleiman as a gay Muslim orderly.
  17. Our Nixon is mainly a collage of images and sounds that tell a familiar story in an entirely new and mesmerizing way.
  18. You’re the Worst immediately finds what all comedies hope for: character chemistry and a certain zing to the writing, transcending its naughtiest nature with a disarming taste of sweetness.
  19. It isn't high literature nor even perhaps high television, but In Treatment does have a welcome, and occasionally riveting, pulpy streak, perhaps inevitable with its promise of peeks behind doors that usually remain closed.
  20. Nothing if not serious, and nothing if not good, NBC's Law & Order nevertheless seems a victim of one particular TV tyranny. Its stories are too long for the one-hour format into which they are stuffed. Otherwise the series... has all the ingredients associated with quality television: strong scripts, relevant themes and a cast that qualifies as first-rate-plus. [13 Sept 1990, p.D1]
    • Washington Post
  21. We have to take the good things about Boardwalk Empire (the acting, the authenticity in its exquisite details and most of the writing) along with the bad (the repetitiveness, the plodding).
  22. Looking feels spot-on and real; it falters only when it occasionally pauses to let one of its characters gaysplain, in dialogue, a subject that it believes a larger audience might not get.
  23. A wonderfully absurd, 10-episode serialized mini-epic about two self-absorbed brothers in suburban Florida whose filmmaking ambitions take a sudden turn into a dark, hilariously violent misadventure.
  24. Lilley's script and performances are rife with recognizable personalities, neuroses and human absurdities.
  25. An enticingly screwy and potentially addictive new crime series from the USA Network, normally not a hotbed of brilliance.
  26. This is Cox's best gig since the end of "Friends" and she clearly knows it, attacking the material at full tooth-and-nail.
  27. It's all so real it verges on the mundane, but the show is also strong and necessary medicine for these times.
  28. Tell Me You Love Me is not only more provocative than any of the broadcast networks' new fall shows, but also more sophisticated--even than those shows that aspire to be "adult."
  29. It winnows down complicated legal arguments and anecdotal cases with compassion and clarity.
  30. NBC's lavish and splashy new version of Bionic Woman, is not, as one might fear, a BW stripped of everything that fans loved about the '70s original.

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