Washington Post's Scores

For 1,353 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Masters of Sex: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Scorpion: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 603
  2. Negative: 0 out of 603
603 tv reviews
  1. By the third episode, Fargo confidently stretches in a direction that is uniquely satisfying.
  2. The first four episodes of this new season are among the series’ best.... Network trauma dramas come and go--and with them a lot of serious doctors and nurses and miserable patients--but rarely do we see a show that understands life in a hospital as well as Getting On did.
  3. A serious and provocative new drama from co-creators David Simon and George Pelecanos.
  4. My love for Undeclared is unconditional... There are many different kinds of funny, and Apatow aims for one of the hardest kinds -- the humor of rueful recognition. You may not laugh till it hurts, but it'll hurt a little when you laugh, because you may recall your own awkward moments of defeat, embarrassment or disillusion. Undeclared is shrewdly observant and richly detailed, and the fact that it's funny, too, is the icing on the cake. Great cake! [25 Sept 2001, p.C01]
  5. High Maintenance is hardly an advertisement for pot; once in a while it even seems to suggest that the drug keeps the Guy and his customers in a slightly numbed state of response to the world around them. These are not the stereotypical stoners of yore. Like so many Americans, they’re just looking for a break from all this. That they do and don’t find relief is part of what makes the show so believably, wistfully good.
  6. It’s brilliant. HBO’s Show Me a Hero is a subtle and deeply effective melding of art and conscience; from its writing and narrative pace to its outstanding performances (particularly that of its star, Oscar Isaac) the miniseries locates a seldom-found sweet spot between storytelling and moralism.
  7. Nashville never strays too far from its real story--the ups and downs of glitzy stardom, with Britton and Panettiere performing their own vocals.
  8. More deeply and uniquely, Lady Dynamite delivers a knowing, if satirical, glimpse of bipolar disorder--sort of like the Carrie Fisher story with a whole lot more Kimmy Schmidt thrown in.
  9. [Dear White People] elevates its source material into a deeply poignant exploration of where we are now.
  10. Though its central mystery may feel old hat to aficionados of the genre, The Missing seems to have a deep respect for its audience. Its red herrings are few and its emphasis on people and their feelings help elevate the series to another level.
  11. While Bright Lights bounces between past and present, Bloom and Stevens wisely allow the narrative to wander where it wants, mirroring the daily lives of their subjects. Where Reynolds is a study in keeping it together, Fisher gives lessons in letting it all hang out.
  12. Everything that’s excellent about The Normal Heart--including compelling performances from its stars, Mark Ruffalo and Julia Roberts, with an especially strong turn from "White Collar’s" Matt Bomer--is also merely just fine; very good but not great; a tear-jerker but not a bawler; and probably beyond reproach.
  13. The pilot (the only episode made available to critics at press time) has some difficult scenes, including an act of marital rape (or something like it), yet the acting is strong and the story is compulsively intriguing. The first thing you want from The Affair is to see where it leads.
  14. All the reasons viewers first loved Getting On are here again.
  15. American Crime is an intentionally exasperating viewing experience; sooner or later, every character does something that’s just flat-out wrong. And yet I can’t remember the last time a network drama had my rapt attention and respect on this many levels at once.
  16. There’s something almost revolutionary about the complex and utterly human teenagers that Ridley has conceived here and that his young actors bring to life. This season will get right under the skin of parents who worry too much (or not enough) about their kids.
  17. Elvis Presley: The Searcher, is a fine demonstration of how the passage of time can help place even the biggest and most overloved superstars into a blessed relief. The film is a calm and deeply empathetic recounting of Presley’s life, split in two. ... A careful mélange of archival film and sonic clarity, The Searcher is a fine reassessment of Presley’s origins and impact.
  18. Hauntingly effective.... Going Clear’s only small problem is how much of Wright’s book it tries to cram into two hours.
  19. I trust completely the template laid out for The Killing by the original "Forbrydelsen" (which I've not seen) and the artistic instincts evident in the first three episodes.
  20. It's often difficult for them to shed the topical baggage they are made to carry and simply be themselves. Still, if you stick with them, you'll see Treme becoming a well-paced work of fiction rather than see Treme spending too much effort speaking truth to an indifferent power.
  21. You needn't be the least bit interested in sports to enjoy Sports Night, the best new ABC sitcom of the season. [22 Sept 1998, p.E01]
    • Washington Post
  22. Making a Murderer is at its best when it taps into our collective fascination with the grisly details of a story that may read like fiction, but isn’t.
  23. Sons of Anarchy may be wild fantasy and melodrama, but it is tempered by a feeling of verity.
  24. Insecure is simple, funny and authentic.
  25. It still isn't quite the hugely confident, competent hit one longs for--especially considering that "Saturday Night Live" creator Lorne Michaels is an executive producer--but it's high in quality, as well as in spirit.
  26. A compelling and sometimes harrowing hour of high-tension urban trauma, different from Bochco's "Hill Street Blues" and at least as good as any other drama series now on the air. It delivers a good, stiff shock now and then, and what's wrong with that? It's surely preferable to shows that lull you into numbness. [21 Sept 1993, p.D1]
    • Washington Post
  27. It’s a precise, sharply executed sendup of the high-tech, billionaire-making culture and economy of Facebook/Google/Apple/Amazon/Yahoo that has infiltrated (“disrupted,” as they say) contemporary life. Better still, Silicon Valley is also here to make you laugh.
  28. Let me just declare how far over the moon I am about Barry, a funny, violent, gripping and masterfully melancholy half-hour show created by Hader and “Silicon Valley” producer Alec Berg. ... From start to finish, it’s just one hell of a show.
  29. So rousingly well done that it seems to come from a different solar system than most contemporary episodic television shows, and yet too many rapturous panegyrics could spoil some of the fun. The two-hour pilot for the series...is so terribly and industriously entertaining that you hate to see the program lumped in with things that are supposedly "good for you." This isn't a John Chancellor commentary. This is living, breathing matter -- clever, thoughtful, ribald and hard-boiled. [15 Sept 1986, p.B1]
    • Washington Post
  30. Downton Abbey comes back stronger and more muscular this time, with intriguing and shocking new plots that provide a bit of vital momentum and an uncharacteristically wrenching dose of tragedy.

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