Washington Post's Scores

For 1,255 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Murder One: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Head Cases: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 550
  2. Negative: 0 out of 550
550 tv reviews
  1. The show seems somehow sleeker and better paced. Characters may now be people first and archetypes second. This has the subtle but immediate effect of making The Walking Dead less predictable and more frightening.
  2. Frasier at this point seems much more amusing when he's at home contending with his father than when he's at the workplace fielding phoned-in woes. But wherever he is, he's clearly in good hands -- the hands of old pros who still have the brash enthusiasm of young Turks. [16 Sept 1993, p.C1]
    • Washington Post
  3. All of which is to say that even for the most open minds, Game of Thrones can be a big stein of groggy slog. On the plus side, the first six episodes are impressively free of sorcery and special effects, and instead rely on the stuff of any deeply dark HBO epic: corruption, deceit, illicit sex (incest in this case), unflinchingly gory violence, and a willingness to kill off a prominent character or two in the service of plot.
  4. As Feynman, it takes the workmanlike Hurt a little too long to shuffle through the slate of go-to moods and characters he’s played already, but he eventually lands on a unique and compelling take on the man.
  5. Scorsese (with Tedeschi’s help) has found a more worthy sweet spot between introducing viewers to a whole other world and simply making film tributes to people he knows and likes.
  6. Gripping ... It sure gets off to a spine-tingling, heart-pounding start. [19 Sep 1994]
    • Washington Post
  7. Better Things may not seem all that original, but it makes up for it with sharp pangs of family intimacy.
  8. In Jenji Kohan’s magnificent and thoroughly engrossing new series, Orange Is the New Black, prison is still the pits. But it is also filled with the entire range of human emotion and stories, all of which are brought vividly to life in a world where a stick of gum could ignite either a romance or a death threat.
  9. Orphan Black has apparently just scraped the surface--not only with the overall narrative arc but with the depth of character development in each of the clones that Maslany plays.... [However] It is chewing so voraciously through its story lines--at such a rapid pace--that it often verges on collapse.
  10. In visual style, witty language, borderline surrealism and overall mad attitude, "Desperate Housewives" stands on a mountaintop all its own, the best new drama of the season and perhaps the best new comedy, too. [3 Oct 2004]
    • Washington Post
  11. Driver brings the right energy and sets the overall mood as a mother who won’t take no for an answer when it comes to JJ’s rights; John Ross Bowie, as her husband, Jimmy, offers a nice counterbalance as a casual, laid-back dad.
  12. One weak link is fellow stand-up comic Michael Richards as Seinfeld's wacky neighbor. He isn't wacky or neighborly enough; it just doesn't work. But he's in the minority where "Seinfeld" is concerned. You may not convulsively guffaw, but you're bound to convincingly smile. Here's one that worked out just right.
  13. Even though Scrubs is the best of the season's new comedies, it may not have the most laughs. But oh mama, it has the most heart. Scrubs is to the average sitcom as a steak at the Palm is to a Big Mac. We are talking an entirely different, and superior, species. [2 Oct 2001, p.C01]
    • Washington Post
  14. But sprawl it must. "True Blood" is a soap opera at its core, which is why it is so overpopulated with sexy characters.
  15. It's to the network's credit that it undertakes projects that aren't necessarily big crowd-pleasers but have a palpable artistic integrity and social significance. [1 June 2002, p.C01]
    • Washington Post
  16. Well, they only had to remake a jillion TV shows from yesteryear to finally get one exactly, perfectly right. Not only is Netflix’s reimagined “One Day at a Time” a joy to watch, it’s also the first time in many years that a multicamera sitcom (the kind filmed on a set with studio-audience laughter) has seemed so instinctively comfortable in its own skin.
  17. Smash is a case where not bad is plenty good enough.
  18. You could call it a formula, but it works. The jokes actually land and they deftly cut the tension in scenes that would be otherwise dour.
  19. The fizzily entertaining pilot of White Collar works hard to establish a vibe of style and smarts, and almost gets the job done.
  20. Elliot may just be another of TV’s millennial hackers-in-hoodies, but Malek’s subtle yet strong performance indicates that there is something wounded and believable about this kid, drawing out the viewer’s sympathies--and suspicions.
  21. Home Fires is noticeably cheesy in parts (feel free to enhance your fun by supplying arch commentary to the dialogue), but it’s also easily absorbing. Also, for those paying close attention, the series is a contextually and satisfyingly feminist take on war.
  22. Season 2 gets off to a strong but intense start with its first three episodes. There are a number of surprises--and cliffhangers so jarring that fans might not want to wait a week to find out what happens.
  23. The fact that Barr's show seems cut so authentically out of middle-class experience gives it a solid familiarity from first encounter. ... "Roseanne" is really different and really funny. [18 Oct 1988]
    • Washington Post
  24. Her initial escapades feel overwhelmingly dour, a byproduct of stilted, emotionless dialogue. Keough plays her role with an almost impenetrable detachment that frustrates at first, but feels necessary in retrospect. ... Things start to get more interesting when Christine learns that one of her wealthy clients has kicked the bucket and left her a large sum of money, setting off alarm bells for the client’s family.
  25. Though the title lamentably plays into the stereotype that all women are just a breakup away from psychosis, there’s plenty else to like about this exuberant and slightly strange dramedy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With so many characters to introduce in a one-hour show, at least a few broad strokes are unavoidable.
  26. Great Migrations lets us be amazed rather than telling us to be, and the amazement quotient is, yes, amazingly high.
  27. The instant the duct tape is ripped off his mouth by his captors, a certain Saul-ness kicks in and Odenkirk’s talent is on full display as Jimmy delivers a pleading, philosophical monologue on--among other things--the awful nature of revenge.
  28. The wickedly addictive (if typographically annoying) UnREAL [has] far more heft and purpose than its premise might seem to contain, is a show within a show.
  29. John Adams is the kind of classily intelligent production that can be happily recommended to everybody. The filmmakers, including executive producer Tom Hanks, have attempted to re-create and enliven history--and they succeed grandly.

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