Band of Brothers : Season 1

  • Network: HBO
  • Series Premiere Date: Sep 9, 2001
User Score
9.3

Universal acclaim- based on 321 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 8 out of 321

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User Reviews

  1. Nov 21, 2011
    10
    An excellent achievement in television storytelling. The amount of time and dedication put into this show by the team at Dreamworks and HBO is stunning.
  2. Dec 5, 2010
    10
    Nothing much to say other than this is the greatest series created. Believable, memorable characters, perfect mix between action and history. Unlike alot of TV that has been played in the recent years this will simply aggravate you that it's only 10 episodes.
  3. Jan 20, 2012
    10
    Perfect from the opening theme to the last minute. An absolute must-see. Great script, well-written characters, impressive attention to detail. No need to explain more.
  4. May 29, 2013
    10
    Bar none the best HBO miniseries made to date, only rivaled but not beaten by The Pacific which came out a few years later. My favorite movie/series ever. Just pure gold.
  5. Nov 19, 2010
    10
    Band of Brothers is one of the most thoroughly enjoyable mini-series ever produced. The story of these memorable characters is one that eclipses perhaps any war story over shown on television OR the big screen.
  6. Jul 6, 2014
    8
    Band of Brothers is an excellent achievement for the television medium. Mixing some of the most terrifying events in human history, as well as providing a deft undertone of courage and heroic triumph all around, Band of Brothers is a visually-stunning and emotionally compelling series from start to finish.
  7. Aug 27, 2014
    10
    The most realistic on-screen war of all time. Very impressive for a mini-series. Though I'd rather think of it as a very long movie. I know I wasn't in World War II, but when watching BoB, I get the feeling that this is how it went down. It doesn't present American soldiers are fully-bred heroes. Instead, the hero factor may be dumbed down... This series dramatically changed my view of theThe most realistic on-screen war of all time. Very impressive for a mini-series. Though I'd rather think of it as a very long movie. I know I wasn't in World War II, but when watching BoB, I get the feeling that this is how it went down. It doesn't present American soldiers are fully-bred heroes. Instead, the hero factor may be dumbed down... This series dramatically changed my view of the war. That's a special thing coming from a television. Expand
  8. Apr 2, 2013
    9
    Based on the book by Stephen Ambrose Band of Brothers is a ten-part series following the actions of Easy Company starting with their initial boot camp training in Currahee.

    Although the show follows Easy Company into the major battles and events of the European Campaign, each battle is shown from a different perspective to movies such as Saving Private Ryan with D-Day for example seeing
    Based on the book by Stephen Ambrose Band of Brothers is a ten-part series following the actions of Easy Company starting with their initial boot camp training in Currahee.

    Although the show follows Easy Company into the major battles and events of the European Campaign, each battle is shown from a different perspective to movies such as Saving Private Ryan with D-Day for example seeing the paratroopers land behind enemy lines without most of their weapons and supplies.
    Slightly less 'Hollywood' than Saving Private Ryan and featuring some incredible acting performances Band of Brothers is a gritty and emotional portrayal of arguably the darkest time in European History.
    Expand
  9. Sep 29, 2011
    10
    Seldomly have I been so moved by a TV series, cared so much for the characters. The show is surprisingly free of pathos and hollow patriotism, even if it mostly shows only one side of the war. It's realistic, honest and gritty, much more so than the flawed Saving Private Ryan.
  10. Feb 28, 2013
    10
    I finally just finished watching Band of Brothers from beginning to end and what an incredible mini-series. From the battle sequences of the earlier and middle episodes to the emotional episodes in the end (especially the impact of the 9th episode), this is a true must watch for Americans in order to better appreciate the sacrifice so many young men made for our freedom. God bless America!
  11. Jan 29, 2013
    10
    Unbelievable in almost every way. Breathtaking, amazing, spellbinding, Band of Brothers is just extraordinary. I truly loved the show, everything about it is top-notch, a masterpiece if there ever was one.
  12. Jul 3, 2013
    10
    Band of Brothers is definitely the best HBO and TV-miniseries ever. The acting is brilliant, and so is the character development and the battle scenes are extremely enjoyable.
  13. Aug 20, 2015
    9
    This is one of the best war films ever created. The sheer 12 hour length of the project really is a testament to how detailed and involved the war can be.
  14. Jul 26, 2013
    10
    IF today's youth insists on learning history from TV shows and games then it should be at least sth like Band Of Brothers they learn from. I've never seen a movie or series that was that authentic. Band Of Brothers convinces with the absence of cheesy Hollywood heroism while at the same time still making the characters believable, likeable and... heroic, but in a thoughtful, good way, notIF today's youth insists on learning history from TV shows and games then it should be at least sth like Band Of Brothers they learn from. I've never seen a movie or series that was that authentic. Band Of Brothers convinces with the absence of cheesy Hollywood heroism while at the same time still making the characters believable, likeable and... heroic, but in a thoughtful, good way, not in a bold Hollywood way. Awesome work!!! Expand
  15. Nov 23, 2013
    10
    By far the best mini series ever made. I've seen this series for about 6 times and i take something away from it every single time. The way that this series show the brotherly loved between men in war is unique.
  16. Aug 17, 2014
    8
    This series is an excellent achievement for the television medium. Mixing some of the most terrifying events in human history, as well as providing a deft undertone of courage and heroic triumph all around, Band of Brothers is a visually-stunning and emotionally compelling story from start to finish, even if it does sometimes offer up a one-sided point of view.
  17. Mar 30, 2015
    8
    This series is an excellent achievement for the television medium. Mixing some of the most terrifying events in human history, as well as providing a deft undertone of courage and heroic triumph all around, Band of Brothers is a visually-stunning and emotionally compelling story from start to finish, even if it does sometimes offer up a one-sided point of view.
  18. Jul 25, 2015
    9
    This series is an excellent achievement for the television medium. Mixing some of the most terrifying events in human history, as well as providing a deft undertone of courage and heroic triumph all around, Band of Brothers is a visually-stunning and emotionally compelling story from start to finish.
  19. Mar 20, 2016
    10
    The HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about theThe HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about the trials and tribulations, the victories and defeats, and the heroism and cowardice of a single company in a war that involved hundreds of thousands of companies. The company in question is Easy Company, a tiny fraction of the 101st Airborne Division, the American military’s paratrooper corp. The mini-series, which ran for 10 straight weeks on HBO, was produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, with Hanks serving as writer and director on a couple of episodes.

    The men that starts and ends as the heart and soul of “Band of Brothers” is Dick Winters (Damian Lewis), a mild-mannered small-town man who proves to be an extraordinary leader, and Winters’ best friend, Lewis Nixon (Ron Livingston), a rich Easterner who discovers his many inadequacies during the war. The mini-series follows Easy Company from their training to their deployment into France during D-Day, and finally into Germany, where Easy Company liberates Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest — the Third Reich leader’s hideaway mountain retreat.

    Through the 10 episodes, the focus shifts between different men of Easy Company, and by series’ end, everyone has been given their time in the spotlight. The remarkable thing is just how well the series works as a single series. At the beginning the characters blend together because there are so many of them, so many names and faces to remember, that they become indistinguishable. By the time the series wraps up with Episode 10, we have intimate knowledge of all those who have survived — and those who didn’t. Because the series is based on true accounts, all of the characters are based on real men, and those who die in the series actually died in real life. This gives the series a grounded and very gritty feel. These people actually died — or lived — through this hell.

    The series is based on a nonfiction book by noted World War II historian Stephen Ambrose. Each episode, besides focusing on different groups of men within Easy Company, uses a round robin of directors and writers. Some names are more famous than others, but each one has a very good grasp on the subject matter, and the directors all employ similar filming styles. It helps that the series employs only two cinematographers in Remi Adefarasin and Joel Ransom. The two men provide the series with a constant look and feel, giving the impression of one long 10-hour movie instead of a 10-part mini-series.

    The series’ maintenance on a constant vibe is also a testament to producers Hanks and Spielberg. The different episodes range from the storming of a French town to the hellish stand of Easy Company in the Bastogne forest under heavy German barrage. Each episode has its own unique view of the war, but the down-and-dirty and the you-can-die-at-any-moment feel remains throughout. Because the series was filmed for HBO, the language is raw, and so are the violence and massive bloodshed. In a word, “Band of Brothers” doesn’t flinch from the horrors and miseries of war, and those with a squeamish stomach will have plenty to close their eyes at. Everything is here, shown in brutal color. Death comes suddenly and without notice, and survival is a miracle of circumstances.

    Besides Damian Lewis and Ron Livingston, other actors of note are Donnie Wahlberg, formerly of the New Kids on the Block, who shows up as an embattled soldier with an unyielding determination to not only survive, but keep his fellow “brothers” alive as well. There’s Matthew Settle as Ronald Speirs, a Captain who may or may not have murdered dozens of German POWs in cold blood. Speirs embodies the stone-cold courage and psychosis of a man born for the single purpose of fighting wars.

    Another very smart move by the producers was to invite the real-life survivors of Easy Company to narrate the beginning of each episode. In each one, we see these grizzled men talking about the horrors of the war, the friendships they built, and the brotherly love they shared for the men of their unit — strangers who became closer than brothers. It’s all real and completely honest. The producers also refuse to identify the real-life men of Easy Company until the very end, in Episode 10. This keeps the audience who hasn’t read Ambrose’s book from guessing who will die and who will survive. It works, and the death of various characters was shocking and sad, and the survivals of others were stunning and euphoric.
    Expand
  20. Mar 22, 2016
    10
    The HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about theThe HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about the trials and tribulations, the victories and defeats, and the heroism and cowardice of a single company in a war that involved hundreds of thousands of companies. The company in question is Easy Company, a tiny fraction of the 101st Airborne Division, the American military’s paratrooper corp. The mini-series, which ran for 10 straight weeks on HBO, was produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, with Hanks serving as writer and director on a couple of episodes.

    The men that starts and ends as the heart and soul of “Band of Brothers” is Dick Winters (Damian Lewis), a mild-mannered small-town man who proves to be an extraordinary leader, and Winters’ best friend, Lewis Nixon (Ron Livingston), a rich Easterner who discovers his many inadequacies during the war. The mini-series follows Easy Company from their training to their deployment into France during D-Day, and finally into Germany, where Easy Company liberates Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest — the Third Reich leader’s hideaway mountain retreat.

    Through the 10 episodes, the focus shifts between different men of Easy Company, and by series’ end, everyone has been given their time in the spotlight. The remarkable thing is just how well the series works as a single series. At the beginning the characters blend together because there are so many of them, so many names and faces to remember, that they become indistinguishable. By the time the series wraps up with Episode 10, we have intimate knowledge of all those who have survived — and those who didn’t. Because the series is based on true accounts, all of the characters are based on real men, and those who die in the series actually died in real life. This gives the series a grounded and very gritty feel. These people actually died — or lived — through this hell.

    The series is based on a nonfiction book by noted World War II historian Stephen Ambrose. Each episode, besides focusing on different groups of men within Easy Company, uses a round robin of directors and writers. Some names are more famous than others, but each one has a very good grasp on the subject matter, and the directors all employ similar filming styles. It helps that the series employs only two cinematographers in Remi Adefarasin and Joel Ransom. The two men provide the series with a constant look and feel, giving the impression of one long 10-hour movie instead of a 10-part mini-series.

    The series’ maintenance on a constant vibe is also a testament to producers Hanks and Spielberg. The different episodes range from the storming of a French town to the hellish stand of Easy Company in the Bastogne forest under heavy German barrage. Each episode has its own unique view of the war, but the down-and-dirty and the you-can-die-at-any-moment feel remains throughout. Because the series was filmed for HBO, the language is raw, and so are the violence and massive bloodshed. In a word, “Band of Brothers” doesn’t flinch from the horrors and miseries of war, and those with a squeamish stomach will have plenty to close their eyes at. Everything is here, shown in brutal color. Death comes suddenly and without notice, and survival is a miracle of circumstances.

    Besides Damian Lewis and Ron Livingston, other actors of note are Donnie Wahlberg, formerly of the New Kids on the Block, who shows up as an embattled soldier with an unyielding determination to not only survive, but keep his fellow “brothers” alive as well. There’s Matthew Settle as Ronald Speirs, a Captain who may or may not have murdered dozens of German POWs in cold blood. Speirs embodies the stone-cold courage and psychosis of a man born for the single purpose of fighting wars.

    Another very smart move by the producers was to invite the real-life survivors of Easy Company to narrate the beginning of each episode. In each one, we see these grizzled men talking about the horrors of the war, the friendships they built, and the brotherly love they shared for the men of their unit — strangers who became closer than brothers. It’s all real and completely honest. The producers also refuse to identify the real-life men of Easy Company until the very end, in Episode 10. This keeps the audience who hasn’t read Ambrose’s book from guessing who will die and who will survive. It works, and the death of various characters was shocking and sad, and the survivals of others were stunning and euphoric.
    Expand
  21. Jul 25, 2016
    10
    Having met Professor Ambrose circa 1990/1991 when he came to CU to give a talk, and having watched this some 15 years ago I decided it was time to devour the series over 3 nights. Perhaps the most gripping WWII period piece ever to be told, directed, and produced. A snapshot of the sacrifice that these men gave portrayed and captured without the ubiquitous Hollywood style - surprisinglyHaving met Professor Ambrose circa 1990/1991 when he came to CU to give a talk, and having watched this some 15 years ago I decided it was time to devour the series over 3 nights. Perhaps the most gripping WWII period piece ever to be told, directed, and produced. A snapshot of the sacrifice that these men gave portrayed and captured without the ubiquitous Hollywood style - surprisingly given Tom Hanks and Saving Private Ryan was 2 years earlier perhaps they learnt something; this series is one that just is without question the greatest war movie/tv series ever. As Brosman has stated The Pacific was its' equal I shall now have to endure that and contemplate where those kinds of people have gone in today's world. Expand
  22. Nov 27, 2010
    10
    A great movie that followed the story of one of the greatest divisions in American history, the 101 st Airborne paratroopers. It was probably my favorite war movie(s) that I have seen. Also, it was one of the few modern WW2 military movies about the European Theatre that didn't focus around the Battle of the Bulge, Holocaust, or D-Day.
  23. Feb 9, 2014
    10
    This is hands down the best series i've ever seen. Band of Brothers tells a deep story of real members of the 101st Airborne Division, and trust me. It tells that story good.
  24. Aug 25, 2010
    10
    my favorit tv show. 2 problems... 1, the sex scene... pointless, and pretty much ruined the episode. alittle warning next time!!!
    2, there were too many main characters that i found it very difficult to focus on only 1 character's development. still ill give it a ten
  25. Jun 5, 2017
    10
    It has been 16 years since this mini series first premiered on HBO, and it is by far still the best narrative depiction of the European theater of WWII for American troops. Every time I have re-watched this, I find something new, a subtle detail, that makes it that much better.

    You walk away feeling completely moved, and you love the characters. It has fantastic action sequences, but
    It has been 16 years since this mini series first premiered on HBO, and it is by far still the best narrative depiction of the European theater of WWII for American troops. Every time I have re-watched this, I find something new, a subtle detail, that makes it that much better.

    You walk away feeling completely moved, and you love the characters. It has fantastic action sequences, but beyond that they really did a great job showing just how emotionally unequipped the US Military was. The individual men that fought in the war had no idea what they were going to walk away from, and the emotional scars still effect our society today. It was the last Great War, it was the last, "typical war," and let's hope it's the last.
    Expand
  26. Sep 6, 2013
    10
    I loved everything about this T.V movie series, it's got its fair share of heart touching moments and violence. The actors were great in this series, everyone was great actually, the story was very touching and violent and revengeful. I'd watch the series again if I had to! 10 out of 10, would totally recommend.
  27. Jul 10, 2014
    10
    That was an amazing account on the war. Great acting, scenes, dialogue, and it was beautiful. One of the best shows/movies on war ever. It was just amazing.
  28. Jul 16, 2014
    10
    Band of Brothers is the bar against which all other media about war in general, and World War II in particular, are measured. The miniseries is nothing short of spectacular. It is one of those rare adaptations that outclasses its source material (though no offense is intended to Stephen Ambrose and his wonderful book about Easy Company).

    From the first episode about the original men of
    Band of Brothers is the bar against which all other media about war in general, and World War II in particular, are measured. The miniseries is nothing short of spectacular. It is one of those rare adaptations that outclasses its source material (though no offense is intended to Stephen Ambrose and his wonderful book about Easy Company).

    From the first episode about the original men of Easy Company being trained by the ruthless and inept Captain Sobel to the finale, spelling out the post-war lives of these men we've just spent 10 hours watching live through hell on earth, the miniseries never fails to captivate. HBO's second WWII miniseries, The Pacific, seems to have taken to heart criticism of BoB that its cast was too large and the series too short to establish character development. I disagree, seeing the large cast of BoB as one of its strengths. The Pacific felt disjointed, transitioning between three main characters and their own supporting casts, leaving the viewer to wonder who we were with in each episode.

    Band of Brothers is a must-see for anyone who considers themselves a history buff, WWII enthusiast, or simply an American who cares about the sacrifices previous generations have made to enable us to live the lives we have today.
    Expand
  29. Jun 14, 2017
    5
    Band of Brothers is the best visual WW2 adaptation to ever grace any screen by brutally recreating the visceral aspects of war through the eyes of average soldiers. Unfortunately, it is thin on the human spectre, with an ensemble of indistinguishable characters who seem like they are only there to move the plot forward rather than be developed well enough for us to care.
  30. Oct 9, 2015
    10
    To be honest, I will never expect to see a better written/acted series out there. HBO brilliantly took the story of a bold company of soldiers who fought in WWII, a few special effects, a group of brilliant and energetic actors, and just pure awesomeness, tossed them all in a pot, stirred it a bit, waited till it was boiling, and ended up with a brilliant concoction that they christenedTo be honest, I will never expect to see a better written/acted series out there. HBO brilliantly took the story of a bold company of soldiers who fought in WWII, a few special effects, a group of brilliant and energetic actors, and just pure awesomeness, tossed them all in a pot, stirred it a bit, waited till it was boiling, and ended up with a brilliant concoction that they christened "Band of Brothers." And boy, does it taste good! (In a bittersweet way) Expand
  31. Apr 13, 2017
    9
    Да, до братьев по оружию были прекрасные сериалы, но, наверное, именно этот сериал показал, что можно вкладывать миллионы долларов в серию и на выходе будет получаться что-то похожее на настоящее кино.
    К сожалению, действия, которые происходят после Нормандии не так эпичны и трогательны.
    В целом высокая планка качества держится до конца, пусть местами и становится скучно. В актёрском
    Да, до братьев по оружию были прекрасные сериалы, но, наверное, именно этот сериал показал, что можно вкладывать миллионы долларов в серию и на выходе будет получаться что-то похожее на настоящее кино.
    К сожалению, действия, которые происходят после Нормандии не так эпичны и трогательны.
    В целом высокая планка качества держится до конца, пусть местами и становится скучно.
    В актёрском составе можно увидеть не мало звёзд, которые ими уже стали или станут в будущем, да и просто все играют отлично.
    Диалоги получились душевные, особенно понравились первая и последняя серии. В них особо ничего не происходит, кроме диалогов, но они крайне интересны.
    Экшен просто потрясающий, словно чувствуешь как тот снаряд содрогает землю под ногами, звук и операторская работа на том же уровне.
    Итог: Местами скучный, но в целом потрясающий сериал, с космическим для своего времени бюджетом. Обязателен для киноманов.
    Expand
  32. Dec 15, 2015
    9
    This series is an excellent achievement for the television medium. Mixing some of the most terrifying events in human history, as well as providing a deft undertone of courage and heroic triumph all around, Band of Brothers is a visually-stunning and emotionally compelling story from start to finish.
  33. Jun 10, 2016
    10
    It is unbelievable how well this show stands the test of time. After watching it for the first time years ago, I was astonished at the quality of the series. The acting was top notch, and many of the actors were made famous by this show. for people I had never seen or heard of, I was absolutely stunned by their performance. I think their choice to use unknown actors was for the best,It is unbelievable how well this show stands the test of time. After watching it for the first time years ago, I was astonished at the quality of the series. The acting was top notch, and many of the actors were made famous by this show. for people I had never seen or heard of, I was absolutely stunned by their performance. I think their choice to use unknown actors was for the best, because you don't go into the show with any preconceived notions, or thoughts about past roles and performances. The story doesn't pull any punches, as they did not change the truth to make a better story, the best possible story actually happened, and was told faithfully by this series. Their were a few slip ups, due mostly to conflicting accounts, but they are insignificant, and do not detract from the magnificence of this show. You can really see the relationships the soldiers had with one another. You feel their pain, sorrow and joy. There is one scene later on that really hits you hard, I won't spoil it, but you'll know it when you see it. They do not show a whole lot of most of the casualties, but this is because they obviously did not survive to tell their story as the survivors did. There is only one thing that I would have changed, and many people will disagree with me. I would have made the series longer, it is already almost 11 hours long, but I feel that trying to convey a story spanning years is extremely difficult to convey in even 30 hours. They probably had limitations, both by the material they had to work with, and from HBO, and anything longer was out of the question. The cost was already astronomical, and anything longer would have been even more expensive. I'm still in disbelief of how well they conveyed the story in the time they had, though at times I was disappointed by the gaps in the narrative, especially at Bastogne, when Doc Rowe left to help injured soldiers, and you missed much of the battle. I usually don't like shaky camera work, but I do feel it adds to this show, as it almost makes you feel like you are actually there, not just watching in your living room. The battle scenes in general were extremely well done, and were stunningly realistic and heart pounding. You held your breath when they were outnumbered, or being fired on, you sighed in relief when they made it through. The one thing it does not convey as well is the casualties, it focuses on a select few men for obvious reasons. By the end of the war, they had taken 150% casualties, a staggeringly high number. The interviews are one of my favorite parts of the series, as you can here the real heroes tell their story. It adds a surprising amount of meaning to the show, and foreshadows what is to come in the episode. The interviews, especially in episode 10 tug on your heart strings, and it just means more coming from the men who saw it themselves. They truly were the greatest generation, and this show shows you why. Expand
  34. Mar 23, 2016
    10
    The HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about theThe HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about the trials and tribulations, the victories and defeats, and the heroism and cowardice of a single company in a war that involved hundreds of thousands of companies. The company in question is Easy Company, a tiny fraction of the 101st Airborne Division, the American military’s paratrooper corp. The mini-series, which ran for 10 straight weeks on HBO, was produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, with Hanks serving as writer and director on a couple of episodes.

    The men that starts and ends as the heart and soul of “Band of Brothers” is Dick Winters (Damian Lewis), a mild-mannered small-town man who proves to be an extraordinary leader, and Winters’ best friend, Lewis Nixon (Ron Livingston), a rich Easterner who discovers his many inadequacies during the war. The mini-series follows Easy Company from their training to their deployment into France during D-Day, and finally into Germany, where Easy Company liberates Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest — the Third Reich leader’s hideaway mountain retreat.

    Through the 10 episodes, the focus shifts between different men of Easy Company, and by series’ end, everyone has been given their time in the spotlight. The remarkable thing is just how well the series works as a single series. At the beginning the characters blend together because there are so many of them, so many names and faces to remember, that they become indistinguishable. By the time the series wraps up with Episode 10, we have intimate knowledge of all those who have survived — and those who didn’t. Because the series is based on true accounts, all of the characters are based on real men, and those who die in the series actually died in real life. This gives the series a grounded and very gritty feel. These people actually died — or lived — through this hell.

    The series is based on a nonfiction book by noted World War II historian Stephen Ambrose. Each episode, besides focusing on different groups of men within Easy Company, uses a round robin of directors and writers. Some names are more famous than others, but each one has a very good grasp on the subject matter, and the directors all employ similar filming styles. It helps that the series employs only two cinematographers in Remi Adefarasin and Joel Ransom. The two men provide the series with a constant look and feel, giving the impression of one long 10-hour movie instead of a 10-part mini-series.

    The series’ maintenance on a constant vibe is also a testament to producers Hanks and Spielberg. The different episodes range from the storming of a French town to the hellish stand of Easy Company in the Bastogne forest under heavy German barrage. Each episode has its own unique view of the war, but the down-and-dirty and the you-can-die-at-any-moment feel remains throughout. Because the series was filmed for HBO, the language is raw, and so are the violence and massive bloodshed. In a word, “Band of Brothers” doesn’t flinch from the horrors and miseries of war, and those with a squeamish stomach will have plenty to close their eyes at. Everything is here, shown in brutal color. Death comes suddenly and without notice, and survival is a miracle of circumstances.

    Besides Damian Lewis and Ron Livingston, other actors of note are Donnie Wahlberg, formerly of the New Kids on the Block, who shows up as an embattled soldier with an unyielding determination to not only survive, but keep his fellow “brothers” alive as well. There’s Matthew Settle as Ronald Speirs, a Captain who may or may not have murdered dozens of German POWs in cold blood. Speirs embodies the stone-cold courage and psychosis of a man born for the single purpose of fighting wars.

    Another very smart move by the producers was to invite the real-life survivors of Easy Company to narrate the beginning of each episode. In each one, we see these grizzled men talking about the horrors of the war, the friendships they built, and the brotherly love they shared for the men of their unit — strangers who became closer than brothers. It’s all real and completely honest. The producers also refuse to identify the real-life men of Easy Company until the very end, in Episode 10. This keeps the audience who hasn’t read Ambrose’s book from guessing who will die and who will survive. It works, and the death of various characters was shocking and sad, and the survivals of others were stunning and euphoric.
    Expand
  35. Jul 30, 2016
    9
    Band of Brothers is a masterpiece of filmmaking, condensing years' worth of material into 10 manageable segments, each with a story, a meaning, and a history all their own, the series telling the story of arguably the most important events the world has ever seen.
  36. Apr 6, 2016
    10
    The HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about theThe HBO original mini-series “Band of Brothers” is the kind of filmmaking enterprise that makes the word “epic” seem inadequate. The series (smartly) takes a myopic view of the war, focusing on a small group of men instead of giving us a grand tale that encompassed all the different shades and theaters of the war effort. It is, for all intents and purposes, a personal story about the trials and tribulations, the victories and defeats, and the heroism and cowardice of a single company in a war that involved hundreds of thousands of companies. The company in question is Easy Company, a tiny fraction of the 101st Airborne Division, the American military’s paratrooper corp. The mini-series, which ran for 10 straight weeks on HBO, was produced by Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg, with Hanks serving as writer and director on a couple of episodes.

    The men that starts and ends as the heart and soul of “Band of Brothers” is Dick Winters (Damian Lewis), a mild-mannered small-town man who proves to be an extraordinary leader, and Winters’ best friend, Lewis Nixon (Ron Livingston), a rich Easterner who discovers his many inadequacies during the war. The mini-series follows Easy Company from their training to their deployment into France during D-Day, and finally into Germany, where Easy Company liberates Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest — the Third Reich leader’s hideaway mountain retreat.

    Through the 10 episodes, the focus shifts between different men of Easy Company, and by series’ end, everyone has been given their time in the spotlight. The remarkable thing is just how well the series works as a single series. At the beginning the characters blend together because there are so many of them, so many names and faces to remember, that they become indistinguishable. By the time the series wraps up with Episode 10, we have intimate knowledge of all those who have survived — and those who didn’t. Because the series is based on true accounts, all of the characters are based on real men, and those who die in the series actually died in real life. This gives the series a grounded and very gritty feel. These people actually died — or lived — through this hell.

    The series is based on a nonfiction book by noted World War II historian Stephen Ambrose. Each episode, besides focusing on different groups of men within Easy Company, uses a round robin of directors and writers. Some names are more famous than others, but each one has a very good grasp on the subject matter, and the directors all employ similar filming styles. It helps that the series employs only two cinematographers in Remi Adefarasin and Joel Ransom. The two men provide the series with a constant look and feel, giving the impression of one long 10-hour movie instead of a 10-part mini-series.

    The series’ maintenance on a constant vibe is also a testament to producers Hanks and Spielberg. The different episodes range from the storming of a French town to the hellish stand of Easy Company in the Bastogne forest under heavy German barrage. Each episode has its own unique view of the war, but the down-and-dirty and the you-can-die-at-any-moment feel remains throughout. Because the series was filmed for HBO, the language is raw, and so are the violence and massive bloodshed. In a word, “Band of Brothers” doesn’t flinch from the horrors and miseries of war, and those with a squeamish stomach will have plenty to close their eyes at. Everything is here, shown in brutal color. Death comes suddenly and without notice, and survival is a miracle of circumstances.

    Besides Damian Lewis and Ron Livingston, other actors of note are Donnie Wahlberg, formerly of the New Kids on the Block, who shows up as an embattled soldier with an unyielding determination to not only survive, but keep his fellow “brothers” alive as well. There’s Matthew Settle as Ronald Speirs, a Captain who may or may not have murdered dozens of German POWs in cold blood. Speirs embodies the stone-cold courage and psychosis of a man born for the single purpose of fighting wars.

    Another very smart move by the producers was to invite the real-life survivors of Easy Company to narrate the beginning of each episode. In each one, we see these grizzled men talking about the horrors of the war, the friendships they built, and the brotherly love they shared for the men of their unit — strangers who became closer than brothers. It’s all real and completely honest. The producers also refuse to identify the real-life men of Easy Company until the very end, in Episode 10. This keeps the audience who hasn’t read Ambrose’s book from guessing who will die and who will survive. It works, and the death of various characters was shocking and sad, and the survivals of others were stunning and euphoric.
    Expand
  37. Apr 8, 2017
    9
    This series is an excellent achievement for the television medium. Mixing some of the most terrifying events in human history, as well as providing a deft undertone of courage and heroic triumph all around, "Band of Brothers" is a visually-stunning and emotionally compelling story from start to finish. This will surely go down in the books as an all-time classic.
Metascore
86

Universal acclaim - based on 28 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 28
  2. Negative: 0 out of 28
  1. Variety
    Reviewed by: Todd McCarthy
    Aug 15, 2013
    90
    There have been many great war films, and any number that have vividly evoked the tension, tragedy and terror of battle. But due to the exceptional amount of time lavished on this story, the fluid manner in which men come and go and the drastic changes that mark them, it's doubtful that any film or TV venture has ever come close to "Brothers" in presenting "What Men Went Through" over the long haul. [4 Sept 2001, p.6]
  2. The Hollywood Reporter
    Reviewed by: Barry Garron
    Aug 15, 2013
    100
    It is doubtful that any war movie on the large or small screen has captured the varied experiences of ordinary soldiers better than Band of Brothers. Whether it's the sheer terror of facing an unseen enemy or the momentary joy following a successful mission, the mini eschews the typical movie cliches while revealing and reveling in the humanity within each member of Easy Company. It explains in large measure why this group of regular guys and others like them have come to be called the Greatest Generation. [5 Sept 2001]
  3. USA Today
    Reviewed by: Robert Bianco
    Aug 15, 2013
    100
    Band of Brothers is significantly flawed and yet absolutely extraordinary -- just like the men it portrays. [7 Sept 2001, p.1E]