• Network:
  • Series Premiere Date: Aug 14, 2005
  • Season #: 1
Barbershop Image
Metascore
64

Generally favorable reviews - based on 15 Critics What's this?

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  • Starring: , ,
  • Summary: Barbershop, based on the successful MGM feature films, was adapted for television by writer/director John Ridley ("Three Kings," "Platinum," "Undercover Brother"), who is very active in television and films, in addition to being a prolific novelist. Robert Teitel and George Tillman, Jr., whoBarbershop, based on the successful MGM feature films, was adapted for television by writer/director John Ridley ("Three Kings," "Platinum," "Undercover Brother"), who is very active in television and films, in addition to being a prolific novelist. Robert Teitel and George Tillman, Jr., who also produced both the "Soul Food" movie and the Showtime television series of the same name, are series executive producers along with Ice Cube with whom they produce the "Barbershop" films. Most of the characters from the popular "Barbershop" movies have been retained, headed by Calvin, the reluctant hero and neighborhood confessor who runs the barbershop he inherited from his father. A few new memorable characters have also been added to the world. The continuing comical exploits of these people will be explored along with contemporary issues facing them, set against the slowly gentrifying backdrop of this fictional Chicago neighborhood. Collapse
  • Genre(s): Comedy
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 15
  2. Negative: 0 out of 15
  1. Reviewed by: Diane Werts
    Apr 20, 2014
    90
    There's a vibrancy here, and a clarity, that we haven't seen in network sitcoms in ages. The way ABC's "Lost" reconfigured dramatic storytelling, Showtime's Barbershop so invigorates the humor format that we hate to call it a sitcom. It's entirely its own animal. And that's evolution of a kind everyone can get behind. [12 Aug 2005, p.]
  2. Reviewed by: Mark Dawidziak
    Apr 19, 2014
    90
    It’s raucously funny in its own right and in its own way. If the first season’s remaining nine episodes are anywhere near as laugh-out-loud hilarious as tonight’s opener, Barbershop: The Series will be nothing less than Showtime’s strongest entry yet in the comedy field. [14 Aug 2005, p.J1]
  3. Reviewed by: Ed Bark
    Apr 16, 2014
    83
    Barbershop is inventively edited, consistently funny and decidedly not for kids. [14 Aug 2005, p.3]
  4. Reviewed by: Robert Bianco
    Apr 20, 2014
    63
    What it lacks, unfortunately, is style -- some sense of smart, well-executed, up-to-date design. You can almost see the corners being cut, from the inconsistent casting to the cheap reliance on sex to the blatantly fake back-lot sets that are trying to pass for Chicago. You may not expect originality in a movie transfer, not when familiarity is what's selling the show. But you do expect Barbershop to display enough style of its own to avoid looking like a cheap knockoff.
  5. The humor in the pilot is anything but razor-sharp: The writers too often confuse coarse language for jokes, and a subplot in which Calvin coaches a Nigerian co-worker on the finer points of the booty call sputters badly. Still, there is promise here, thanks mainly to a collection of intriguing characters. [14 Aug 2005, p.F4]
  6. Reviewed by: Doug Elfman
    Apr 20, 2014
    50
    [It] isn't awful. Mostly, it's just too tightly packed, like those peanut cans kids open and giant toy snakes spring out. [11 Aug 2005, p.49]
  7. Reviewed by: Connie Ogle
    Apr 19, 2014
    40
    In its first episode, Barbershop drops the ball, mistaking mere profanity for edginess and digging for laughs in dull, typical sitcom fashion. [14 Aug 2005, p.5]

See all 15 Critic Reviews