Doomsday Preppers Image
Metascore
62

Generally favorable reviews - based on 5 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 9 Ratings

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  • Summary: The National Geographic channel profiles American families who are preparing for the end of the world with stockpiles of food, supplies, and weapons.
  • Genre(s): Documentary
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 5
  2. Negative: 0 out of 5
  1. Reviewed by: Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Feb 8, 2012
    70
    An intriguing look at Americans with their own ideas of the purpose-driven life.
  2. Reviewed by: Mike Ward
    Feb 8, 2012
    60
    Doomsday Preppers can't seem to help occasionally taking a jab at the undeniable eccentricity of prepping, or generally making light.
  3. Reviewed by: David Hinckley
    Feb 8, 2012
    60
    This is fascinating and clearly National Geographic thinks so, too.
  4. Reviewed by: David Knowles
    Feb 8, 2012
    60
    Doomsday Preppers could have been a grade-A hour of gawker television on par with the likes of Extreme Couponing and Hoarders. Unfortunately, the inclusion of an "expert assessment" of our protagonists' preparations lands the show on thin ethical ice.
  5. Reviewed by: Mark A. Perigard
    Feb 8, 2012
    58
    As the hour proceeds, the tether to sanity--or at least common sense--frays.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 5
  2. Negative: 1 out of 5
  1. Feb 23, 2012
    10
    Doomsday Preppers is a show about 3 different people in every episode (new situations, new people each show, no reoccurring characters) show off their homes, supplies, and tactics/plans that they have in place if the "end of days" ever happens. It details a new person and a new situation as to how the world can actually end (super inflation, yellowstone super volcano, lack of oil, and a pandemic are just to name a few). I love it. I think often about the possibilities of how life as we know it could end, and while I'm not currently prepared for such an event, tv shows like Jericho and Walking Dead or movies like Mad Max or I Am Legend have always intrigued me. This show is along those same lines. Check it out, as even if the subject doesn't interest you, the people they show are characters in and of themselves. Expand
  2. Mar 9, 2012
    8
    Great show so far, but with room for improvement. Short season to test the waters but I think it's a definite hit. The world we live in is volatile and things could fall apart very quickly. As a history major in college, i often thought about our society and whether we would stand the tests of time. This show does a good job at showing these people's plans to survive a cataclysmic event which most dare not even think about (or it would shatter their perfect blissful ignorance). Hopefully the show also helps people to understand how to prepare and how to live on your own (without the need for govt involvement in everything you do). I wish our own govt had better plans and let the public know what to do in case of extreme emergencies such as meteors, super-volcanoes, massive earthquakes, and the like...but they don't really care b/c they know the govt would likely not be able to help out very many people after such an event. I wish all the preppers the best and want to thank Nat Geo for giving everyone a glimpse at what it really takes to prepare for events of that magnitude. Expand
  3. Feb 15, 2012
    7
    It's a fun show. Somehow, it scratches a certain itch that used to be scratched by shows like "Lifestyles of the Rich & Famous". I know I'll never store 2 years worth of food in my basement, but knowing that these folks would be the new "haves" after some disaster - even though that disaster is highly unlikely to happen - makes them somehow special in a weird part of my brain. The sad part of this is that the best "preppers" all look like they're 60+ years old - so they'll have to pass on their techniques to the next generation quick - along with those 8-month old eggs. Expand
  4. Feb 24, 2013
    4
    Apart from I think 99% of the preppers are simply mentally ill (yeah having 150 firearms, forcing your children to walk 24 kilometers, living in a bunker every summer for months!!!, forcing you son to take bath in the garden during winter, to wash down the imaginary bacterias from his body....is NUTS), the show is quiet decent.I do not like (unethical) how NatGeo reviews the preparedness level of these people. I think preparing for something that has 0.0000000000000001% chance to happen is just stupid (Super volcano eruptions, ?zombies?? Seriously?). You can not live your life in fear. Most of these people have other problems and preparing is just a projection of these problems. It is also sad that Americans prepare to kill their own people with no remorse. Basically they are preparing to fight against their own nation... Collapse
  5. Feb 19, 2013
    2
    For a while this show was entertaining. For those who live in disaster-prone areas it might even have been a little helpful. It was interesting to see all the people that stocked up on food, prepared escape plans, and trained 'just-in-case'. However, over time this show's guests have become more and more extreme. The latest episode I've seen, for example, featured one man who not only practices guerrilla warfare tactics, booby traps his own house, and talks about how he is a "good guy" who is going to kill the "evil" people (he doesn't elaborate on exactly who that is), but also trains a group of teenagers who he calls his "Junior Rangers" in the same guerrilla warfare, indoctrinates them with his political ideology, and has plans for them to join him on his ranch in the event of an emergency. The shows second guest believes the US government is "evil" and is preparing for war against his own nation. Both of these guests and those of several episodes before the aforementioned one are one bad day away from becoming domestic terrorists or the next Ruby Ridge standoff. By this new definition of "Prepper" both Charles Manson's "Family" and Jim Jones's "People's Temple" were a perfect fit. Expand