Firefly : Season 1

  • Network: FOX
  • Series Premiere Date: Sep 20, 2002
Season #: 1, 2
User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 414 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 414

Where To Watch

Stream On
Stream On

Review this tv show

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling

User Reviews

  1. Apr 30, 2013
    5
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. You all are going to think I am nuts, but I did not think it was that good. It is not as low as The Avengers, but it is just in-between something and nothing. But I will give the show the benefit of the doubt because of its unfortunate end.

    The first season of any show is rough, and to end it there is just plain sad. Shows nowadays never get a chance to reach their potential, not even the film Serenity satisfied me.

    Some characters never get a chance to show their true colors, except if you are the star of course, and the Tam siblings, even though Rivers character was so formulaic that I knew where they are going with this character, and Jane Cob, which despite one particular episode, I did not find him interesting at all.

    Kaylee was the only character that stood out from the crew; it really was the performance that sold me.
    Wash however was very hard for me to see, because when he is not on screen I completely forget he exists. As much as Jane is somewhat dull, he at least is memorable. And the pilot’s death in the feature film, while shocking, goes over my head as soon as the next scene starts.

    But as stated, if not for the shows untimely end, this review would be different.
    The cast and crew should be fortunate that there are loyal fans out that will fall on to the sword for their success, because honestly, they would be dead and forgotten without them.
    Expand
  2. Mar 9, 2013
    6
    Its smart and sexy, but Firefly sometimes falls into way too many elements of your every day action film, making it a rather silly show. But Firefly stills fits its definition of fun.
  3. Apr 14, 2014
    6
    I retrieved this 2002 14-episode series from Netflix, and I’ve watched almost every episode. It is an excellent sample of Western-scifi, which is not an easy genre to pull off. The noble Hollywood failure, Cowboys and Aliens, is a good example of how problematic it can be to mix outer space with the good old-fashioned Wild West.

    Why the series got canceled after one season is still
    I retrieved this 2002 14-episode series from Netflix, and I’ve watched almost every episode. It is an excellent sample of Western-scifi, which is not an easy genre to pull off. The noble Hollywood failure, Cowboys and Aliens, is a good example of how problematic it can be to mix outer space with the good old-fashioned Wild West.

    Why the series got canceled after one season is still speculative. The former president of Fox said the numbers simply weren’t there; others say the series was aired out of sequence and doomed to a bad Friday night slot. The cast should have been a winning combination—an eclectic group of unique characters, each one with their own history, quirks, and emotional problems. Nathan Fillion was positively charismatic in his role as Captain Malcolm (“Mal”) Reynolds, and even looked like he was set to inherit the mantle that had been left behind by the young Harrison Ford. Unfortunately, that never happened. All of the cast are still active and working today, mostly kept employed in other television series. Firefly became a major feature film that was well received in 2005—the title was changed to Serenity, which was the name of Captain Mal’s spaceship. Serenity was a “Firefly,” which was the name of the class of spaceship that Captain Mal was flying. The first time he saw the used Firefly, he fell in love with it and purchased it.

    I have a different theory about why the series could not become a mainstream hit. There exists throughout the series a preoccupation with the theme of legalized prostitution; it is a major thread in every episode and comprises the entire plot line of Episode 12, entitled “Heart of Gold” (as in “a whore with a heart of gold”). The character of Inara, played to perfection by Morena Baccarin, embodies the role of what would seem to be a geisha or a courtesan. She is a licensed prostitute, called a “companion,” and she is a permanent part of the spaceship crew, although she has her own shuttle attached to the ship, which means she can leave at any time to visit rich clients on other planets. As a registered companion, she is extremely selective, charges high fees, and is considered to be therapeutic in her role.

    A spiritual side of Inara’s profession is alluded to but not enough to lift her completely out of the stigma of being a prostitute. Captain Mal often refers to her as a “whore,” but she always rebukes him for using that word. The “whores” as seen in Episode 12, are freelancers who work out of brothels and are looked down upon because they are not properly trained and licensed. Inara dresses lavishly, her shuttle looks like an Asian boudoir, and she does what looks like a Japanese tea ceremony for her clients. There is a plot thread regarding her secret feelings for Captain Mal; she is in love with him, but he is off limits to her. How a legal prostitute can have her own personal love life is never clarified, so it is easier for her to be in love with a man who has only a peripheral interest in her and often plays mind games to keep her hanging on.

    I personally believe that the overemphasis on legalized prostitution is what brought this series down. It could not have possibly become a new Star Trek under those circumstances. What kind of message would that send to children and adolescents? Legalized prostitution does not have to be consigned to the futuristic world of science fiction. Prostitution is legal in Italy, although brothels and pimps are not. Prostitutes in Italy are considered to be sex-care workers, and there are government guidelines and laws to protect them. Coincidentally, in the Italian vernacular, they are known as “Lucciole,” which translates into English as “fireflies.” Needless to say, the reality of legalized prostitution could not be nearly as glamorous or as beautiful as Inara (who in only one episode has to go in for a government-mandated medical examination). As with the glamorization of prostitution in the 1990 film, Pretty Woman, much damage can be done to impressionable young girls by idealizing this kind if life. The prostitution theme is infused into nearly every episode of the Firefly series, a peculiar and obsessive plot device that may have proved to be the series’ fatal flaw.
    Expand
  4. Jul 21, 2014
    6
    Good show but for the overarching storyline hte number of episodes is just too great. The first one or two and the last one or two were good the episodes in between seemend to be just "today the crew meets people on this planet and gets into trouble" - episodes (bvasically filler), which may be ok for a show but i don't like it.
    Also the weapons and technology in general doesn't add up
    Good show but for the overarching storyline hte number of episodes is just too great. The first one or two and the last one or two were good the episodes in between seemend to be just "today the crew meets people on this planet and gets into trouble" - episodes (bvasically filler), which may be ok for a show but i don't like it.
    Also the weapons and technology in general doesn't add up for me, sometimes it's futuristic, sometimes it's wild west 19th century. I know it's a premise of the show and it makes it special and sometimes interesting but mostly it's just unrealistic for this setting.
    Expand
Metascore
63

Generally favorable reviews - based on 30 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 30
  2. Negative: 5 out of 30
  1. Reviewed by: James Poniewozik
    Jun 28, 2013
    40
    There are no aliens, no teleporters and no lasers. And sadly--given creator Joss Whedon's track record with Buffy the Vampire Slayer--no laughs or thrills.
  2. Reviewed by: Ken Tucker
    Jun 14, 2013
    83
    'Firefly' benefits enormously from Whedon's ability to take the clichés of any genre and give them a good, hard yank.
  3. Newark Star-Ledger
    Reviewed by: Alan Sepinwall
    Feb 24, 2013
    70
    The whole space cowboy gimmick shouldn't work, but Whedon and co-creator Tim Minear have managed to create a world where space stations and men on horseback can plausibly co-exist. Little touches like deliberately old-fashioned dialogue - one character describes the bar fight as "just an honest brawl between folk" - help immensely. [19 Sept 2002]