• Network: AMC
  • Series Premiere Date: Jul 19, 2007
  • Season #: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7
Metascore
88

Universal acclaim - based on 28 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 28
  2. Negative: 0 out of 28
  1. Reviewed by: Matthew Gilbert
    Apr 4, 2013
    100
    AMC’s Mad Men returns for season 6 with two hours that are as rich and as deftly literary as anything in the history of the show. The premiere operates like a series of exquisitely written theatrical set pieces, one after another that add up to a moving, ironic, and often comic group portrait.
  2. Reviewed by: Mark A. Perigard
    Apr 4, 2013
    91
    Mad Men is back with another ridiculously addictive season.
  3. Reviewed by: Joanne Ostrow
    Apr 5, 2013
    100
    Mad Men remains a brilliant, perfectly designed and visually exciting series--one of the very best the medium has to offer--whether you take it at face value or find the experience of watching the TV series enriched by tracing the modern echoes.
  4. Reviewed by: Jeff Jensen
    Apr 3, 2013
    75
    Like Betty's frumpy frocks, Mad Men's supersize episodes aren't flattering. Weiner should stick with tighter, denser storytelling packages. I hope he also delivers the season of change that the premiere seems to promise.
  5. Reviewed by: Alan Sepinwall
    Apr 2, 2013
    100
    It continues to be one of the most satisfying dramas in the history of the medium.
  6. Reviewed by: David Hinckley
    Apr 4, 2013
    100
    While many shows that have reached this point in the road have left their creative peak behind, Mad Men shows no such erosion. It still has things it wants to say and it still has the poetry to say them well.
  7. 80
    [A] clever, at times tricky season opener. In Lost-like style, it strategically withholds key information that would help us make immediate sense of Don’s behavior, which by turns suggests a prisoner, a sleepwalker, and a ghost.
  8. Reviewed by: Linda Stasi
    Apr 4, 2013
    75
    The ultimate style show is still so fascinating that I couldn’t stop watching, all the while thinking, “Why is this so good?”
  9. Reviewed by: Verne Gay
    Apr 5, 2013
    100
    Terrific start to the 6th.
  10. Reviewed by: Tom Gliatto
    Apr 4, 2013
    88
    Matthew Weiner has advanced the show far enough into the '60s that its fundamental philosophical question begins to generate its own oppressive suspense. [15 Apr 2013]
  11. Reviewed by: Ellen Gray
    Apr 5, 2013
    80
    Two hours can be a long time for a show that's not heavy on action sequences, but "The Doorway" does eventually take us somewhere.
  12. Reviewed by: David Hiltbrand
    Apr 4, 2013
    100
    The sumptuous two-hour opener to Season 6 is a remarkable piece of work--beautiful, provocative, and deep. It's an unexpectedly exquisite distillation of the show's themes and aspirations.
  13. Reviewed by: Rob Owen
    Apr 5, 2013
    100
    Even in its sixth season Mad Men, remains a standout, a better series than 95 percent of what's on television.
  14. Reviewed by: Curt Wagner
    Apr 5, 2013
    100
    Unlike Season 5's two-hour premiere, which easily could have been edited to half its length, every minute of Sunday's episode feels necessary, checking in with all our favorite players and dancing with Weiner's favorite theme, death.
  15. Reviewed by: Willa Paskin
    Apr 4, 2013
    70
    Moving, striving, trying, changing, it’s good for the characters on Mad Men and it’s good for the drama that is Mad Men. The back of Don Draper’s head is still gorgeous, but it’s starting to feel awfully still.
  16. Reviewed by: David Wiegand
    Apr 2, 2013
    100
    Don Draper's journey has been and remains maddening, in a very good way as far as what makes a great TV show.
  17. Season 6 jumps ahead in time and launches with a beautifully written, contemplative two-hour opener called "The Doorway."
  18. Reviewed by: Luis Sanchez
    Apr 5, 2013
    88
    As always, there's no predicting where all of this is headed, but if one last reference to The Divine Comedy is any sign, this season's journey toward the final act of Mad Men's American epic promises to be its most challenging and rewarding.
  19. Reviewed by: Jace Lacob
    May 30, 2013
    90
    A beautifully realized and dazzling re-creation of our collective past and a glimpse of the infinite and unknowable.
  20. Reviewed by: Melody Baetens
    Apr 5, 2013
    83
    The suits are louder, the sideburns are longer; aside from that, the season-six premiere proves to be classic Mad Men with plenty of vice (maybe more than before, at least more pot), long hours at work and lots of questions.
  21. Reviewed by: Tim Goodman
    Apr 1, 2013
    90
    What’s intriguing and partly amazing about the two hour "movie” called “The Doorway” that opens the season April 7 is that Weiner has not lost his touch at writing a beautifully crafted script--jammed with the sadness and humor and personal revelations we’ve all come to appreciate. But in addition to that, he’s decided to really hit home Mad Men’s key theme in the first two hours with a kind of ferocity of intent we’ve rarely seen from him.
  22. Reviewed by: Maureen Ryan
    Apr 3, 2013
    100
    The AMC drama is full of sharp writing, ambiguous segues, effective surprises and the usual array of pitch-perfect performances.
  23. Reviewed by: James Poniewozik
    Apr 4, 2013
    90
    It’s a sumptuous pleasure to go through one doorway and another, feeling all the while the dawning knowledge that someday we will turn a corner, and come to the last.
  24. Reviewed by: Matt Roush
    Apr 5, 2013
    80
    Even at its most ponderous and indulgent, Mad Men casts a mesmerizing spell, and that's true throughout this less-than-satisfying but intermittently intriguing chapter.
  25. Reviewed by: Ed Bark
    Apr 4, 2013
    83
    Weiner’s end-game for his leading man does not appear to be brightly lit. Nor is Season 6 of Mad Men off to a particularly sparkling start creatively while we wait for the worst to come.
  26. Reviewed by: Brian Lowry
    Mar 29, 2013
    80
    Without giving anything away, the guest cast is unusually strong, offering the prospect of fertile subplots going forward, while some of the regulars don’t figure prominently at first--again, pretty par for the course.
  27. Reviewed by: Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Apr 4, 2013
    80
    All are reintroduced in a premiere episode that lumbers along, overpopulated, burdened by the weight of its ambitions, flattened by misbegotten detours--but one, nevertheless, that surges to life in the end.
  28. Reviewed by: Hank Stuever
    Apr 5, 2013
    50
    Mad Men is that rare thing that can be as infuriating as it is perfect. I’ve gone back and forth (and hot and cold) on it as much as a critic can; I warmed to it last season but feel a familiar chill this time.
User Score
8.4

Universal acclaim- based on 192 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 19
  2. Negative: 0 out of 19
  1. Apr 22, 2013
    5
    Sorry to be Debbie Downer but after all these seasons, I'm finding Mad Men's formula is getting a bit stale. (Warning, this got longer than I expected.) Let's see:

    Don is the same old angsty, misogynist womanizer, cheating and demanding to get his way, as always, even though it's apparent he's starting to become a relic of the 1950's in a rapidly changing late 1960's world. Roger, who used to be one of my favorite characters, has become a caricature rather than a meaningful player (the epitome of this shift was season 5's LSD episodes). Pete's the same jerk he's been since day one, just with more power, while Harry and Ken are still bit pieces who have never been compelling to watch. Despite the events of season 5, Joan is still the same old Joan, confident but angry because of the glass ceiling, yet happy to employ the double standard of exploiting her sexuality while complaining about being treated like a sex pot.

    I find myself NOT missing Betty, Henry, and Sally at all and the characters of Megan and Trudy are exceedingly stereotypical and grate my nerves to the point where I'd rather mute the TV when they're on.

    Peggy is the only character this season who has undergone MEANINGFUL change this season and it's sad to see she's getting minimal screen time. More screen time than Betty, at least. Barely.

    I miss the Mad Men of the first three seasons. Characters like Paul Kinsey and the dynamic story of his beliefs on civil rights and interracial relationships or characters like Salvatore Romano and dealing with homosexuality in the early 1960's. Those were compelling stories that ran along side the main story lines and they were GREAT secondary characters. Even recently, the story of Lane Pryce and his relocation from England, coming to terms with being an immigrant, and his tragic end was a solid secondary story line, yet his contributions to SCDP have been all but forgotten except in scant one liners.

    The show used to feel fluid and organic. We knew who the main characters were but the secondary characters were interesting as well. They could craft a story about even the most mundane aspect of advertising and make it watchable. Now it just feels completely predictable. We know how the main characters are going to act and react, there are almost no plot "twists" that could shock the viewers anymore, and there are almost no compelling secondary characters or storylines.
    Full Review »
  2. Apr 7, 2013
    10
    Mad Men`s heart of darkness remains as beguiling and poignant as ever!
  3. Apr 8, 2013
    9
    Mad Men is back, and it's better than ever. Most shows at this point tend to hiccup as they find their identity and decide how to end their show. Not Mad Men. It would seem that Matthew Weiner, the shows creator and former Sopranos writer, has a specific ending in mind. The themes of existentialism still run very heavily through the show in the sixth season. The acting is superb as usual and the writing hews close the bone. Even though I've only seen the first two hours, I can easily tell this is shaping up to be a fantastic season of Mad Men. Full Review »