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  • Series Premiere Date: Jan 23, 1996
  • Season #: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6
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  • Starring: Brandy Norwood, Sheryl Lee Ralph, Lamont Bentley
  • Summary: Ralph R. Farquhar who created the series "Moesha", made this show a big success after the last failing show "South Central". The series featured Grammy Award Winning artist Brandy Norwood and actress Sherly Lee Ralph in a series that showed how life was really like in Leimert Park, Los Angeles California. Moesha Deniese Mitchell is teenager who soon became an adult, learning various issues to do with love, sex, relationship and family. Following her mothers death Moesha looked after her father Frank Mitchell (William Allen Young) and brother Myles Mitchell (Marcus T. Paulk) She jealous of her new step-mother Dee Mitchell (Sherly Lee Ralph) who seemed to be taking over her role but the two have gotten to know and understand each other. Mo's friends Kim Parker (Countess Vaughn-James), Niecy Jackson (Shar Jackson) and Hakeem Campbell (Lamount Bentley) have made it through teenage adventure-hood with Moesha into becoming mature adults. When Countess Vaughn James left the series to do with Mo'Nique on her own show called "The Parkers" which was the "Moesha" spin-off, Ray-J came along to take over the show and became the new cast member of the show. After the show was cancelled in 2001 due to falling ratings, the series became best known for being the first to run on UPN for 6 seasons in 6 years . Expand
  • Genre(s): Comedy
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Reviewed by: Ken Tucker
    Jun 12, 2013
    83
    Some of the gags are predictable ... But Farquhar's series ... are distinctive for the way they aren't so much interested in what's said as in how it's said and what it means.