Murphy Brown : Season 1

  • Network: CBS
  • Series Premiere Date: Nov 14, 1988
Season #: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 10 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 10
  2. Negative: 0 out of 10

Critic Reviews

  1. Miami Herald
    Reviewed by: Steve Sonsky
    Jul 23, 2013
    90
    It's very, very funny. ... The ingredients are all here (neat star, clever writing, a talented, well-defined supporting ensemble) for a classy comedy hit in the Cheers or Mary Tyler Moore Show mold. [14 Nov 1988]
  2. Chicago Tribune
    Reviewed by: Clifford Terry
    Jul 23, 2013
    80
    Appearing in her first TV series, Bergen brings in a full-court-press performance-stylish, sardonic and funny. Couple that with English's crisp dialogue, which consistently veers off just at the point it seems to be settling for the formulaic, and "Murphy Brown" comes up as a bright, promising half-hour. [14 Nov 1988]
  3. Reviewed by: John J. O'Connor
    Jul 23, 2013
    80
    The supporting cast... is strong. And the star is wonderful. ... There's a nice urban, smart-alecky tone to ''Murphy Brown.'' Now it's up to the scriptwriters.
  4. Washington Post
    Reviewed by: Tom Shales
    Jul 23, 2013
    80
    "Murphy Brown" crackles, flashes and scintillates. [14 Nov 1988]
  5. Boston Globe
    Reviewed by: Ed Siegel
    Jul 23, 2013
    75
    The show needs some sharpening, but "Murphy Brown" looks like a winner. [14 Nov 1988]
  6. Newsday
    Reviewed by: Marvin Kitman
    Jul 23, 2013
    70
    Heretofore, I have never thought of Candice Bergen as a major comedienne like Andrea Martin or Catherine O'Hara. But I like her as Murphy Brown. She has the addictive personality of the character she plays, and can grow on you. [14 Nov 1988]
  7. Newsweek
    Reviewed by: Harry F. Waters
    Jul 23, 2013
    70
    There's lots to love about the CBS sitcom "Murphy Brown," even though Candice Bergen works too hard at grabbing her share. ... This sitcom sparkles with acerbic intelligence, though its fascination with the real TV world occasionally gets out of hand. [28 Nov 1988]
  8. San Diego Union-Tribune
    Reviewed by: Joe Stein
    Jul 23, 2013
    70
    It's all great fun, and the idea of putting a hard-nosed, highly competent journalist into situations where she must deal with neophytes and no-talents is rife with possibilities, especially since Bergen plays Murphy Brown as a complex, intriguing neurotic. Not everything works in the debut episode, but enough to mark this as a sitcom with possibilities. [14 Nov 1988]
User Score
5.6

Mixed or average reviews- based on 9 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 1 out of 2
  1. Feb 15, 2014
    3
    There's little doubt that this show was enjoyed by many back in the late 80s. However, as a 17 year-old male living in the 21st century, IThere's little doubt that this show was enjoyed by many back in the late 80s. However, as a 17 year-old male living in the 21st century, I felt very disconnected from this show. What was humorous then has now become comedy tropes, unfortunately.

    I could only bear to watch 5 episodes, so I honestly haven't completed the whole Season. Murphy Brown's a decent character herself but by now, all of her episodic plot-lines have been done to death. And Miles, the co-star, comes off as a pretty flat character. Otherwise, the ensemble did nothing but irritate me.

    Comedies can more or less get away with weaker elements if the humour is still there, but it's sadly not the case here. I probably laughed only about one time per episode, which was a slight relief from mostly boring TV. Again, this may have been funny in the 80s, but all I see now is out of date references and overused jokes.
    Full Review »
  2. Dec 4, 2015
    10
    Murphy Brown was the Baby Boomer's easy, entertaining way that even though we wanted it all...remember the saying, "Man makes plans, and GodMurphy Brown was the Baby Boomer's easy, entertaining way that even though we wanted it all...remember the saying, "Man makes plans, and God laughs"/ That pretty much sums it up. We could make a valiant effort to have/be/want it all, juggling all those balls of responsibility; but we would, without a doubt, drop at least 1 of the activities/responsibilities we were trying to keep in the air. Murphy Brown, besides being able to cut Dan Quayle to size (the guy who thought Murphy was a real person, not a tv character, ;also did not know how to spell potato), which made it ok for the rest of us to not feel utterly defeated, since we were among others who couldn't keep juggling all those darn balls , keeping them in the air. Full Review »