• Network: CBS
  • Series Premiere Date: Sep 26, 2013
  • Season #: 1
Metascore
58

Mixed or average reviews - based on 28 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 28
  2. Negative: 3 out of 28
  1. Reviewed by: David Wiegand
    Sep 24, 2013
    100
    [The Crazy Ones and The Michael J. Fox Show] have great, always likable stars heading up solid ensemble casts in well-written and mostly plausible shows. Who could ask for anything more?
  2. Reviewed by: Glenn Garvin
    Sep 26, 2013
    80
    The subtext of loss and longing, which sometimes isn’t all that sub, makes The Crazy Ones a tightrope act. But Kelley gets tremendous support from his cast. The madcap Williams has never been better, and Gellar’s performance is a magnificently winning mixture of quiet desperation, mounting rage and wistful yearning.
  3. Reviewed by: Dorothy Rabinowitz
    Sep 20, 2013
    80
    This workplace comedy comes out of the gate with instant appeal. Mr. Williams is never less than formidable in his delivery; the writing is never less than crisp and sometimes it's crisply hilarious.
  4. Reviewed by: Tom Gliatto
    Oct 25, 2013
    75
    Williams's humming energy is charming (and more softly winsome than it used to be.) The challenge is to surround him with actors with enough skill to play off or with him. Gellar, as his daughter, doesn't quite pull it off. Hamish Linklater, as an art director, does. [4 Nov 2013]
  5. Reviewed by: Henry Goldblatt
    Oct 11, 2013
    75
    Ultimately your enjoyment still depends on whether or not Robin Williams' patter--which needs to be dialed back about 20 percent--makes you crazy.
  6. They [Robin Williams and James Wolk] seem to be having a blast playing off one another, and their comedic energy is infectious.
  7. Reviewed by: Sydney Bucksbaum
    Sep 26, 2013
    70
    Williams signature brand of comedy and big personality dominate the show, but with an ensemble of Sarah Michelle Gellar, James Wolk and Hamish Linklater, it's less one-note than expected.
  8. Reviewed by: Ellen Gray
    Sep 26, 2013
    70
    As an eccentric genius, Williams is in familiar waters, and he's found a playmate in James Wolk, who's somehow able to keep up with an actor whose streams of consciousness can be Class V rapids. Gellar's playing it straight, but a scene in which she has to sing in front of Kelly Clarkson suggests she's game for anything.
  9. Reviewed by: Hank Stuever
    Sep 13, 2013
    67
    Wolk provides just the sort of casting ingenuity The Crazy Ones needs, especially as a counterbalance to Williams, who, it goes without saying, will motormouth his way through any scene he can. ... But watching [Gellar] play Williams’s dutiful and comedy-challenged daughter is a dreary primer in the pitfalls of big-name casting.
  10. Reviewed by: Robert Bianco
    Sep 25, 2013
    63
    You'd be hard-pressed to find better actors than Crazy has gathered, and despite their show's abrupt shifts from frantic to torpid, there are moments when they make the relationships work. What they're less likely to do is make you laugh.
  11. Reviewed by: David Hiltbrand
    Sep 26, 2013
    60
    Williams is a treasure, leapfrogging through voices, characters, and puns.... He's also the only reason to watch, because the show's premise is so limiting.
  12. Reviewed by: Robert Lloyd
    Sep 26, 2013
    60
    It is buried in whimsicality and paeans to "feeling" and leaping into the void. And the stars do feel out of sync. (Williams is more comfortable riffing with James Wolk--"Mad Men's" Bob Benson--as... some other guy who works there.) We will give it some time.
  13. Reviewed by: David Hinckley
    Sep 26, 2013
    60
    The Crazy Ones has its charms. It also has yet to find the balance between Williams’s shtick--his solos, basically--and the good ensemble comedy that would keep viewers coming back.
  14. Reviewed by: Matthew Gilbert
    Sep 25, 2013
    60
    The product tie-in is tiresome, but Wolk in particular, with his winks and grins, adds warmth as Williams’s cocky protege. He also rescues a few scenes in which Williams starts to drift into the nonsense stratosphere.
  15. Reviewed by: Brian Lowry
    Sep 25, 2013
    60
    Kelley is no stranger to writing comedy, even if it’s traditionally been in service of hourlong shows, and between his gifts as a wordsmith and Williams’ frenetic energy (best displayed in a closing-credits outtake sequence), The Crazy Ones has potential beyond what the pilot demonstrates.
  16. Reviewed by: Rob Owen
    Sep 25, 2013
    60
    It shows the most potential as a buddy comedy focused on Mr. Williams and Mr. Wolk. By comparison, Ms. Gellar’s character is a wet blanket.
  17. Reviewed by: Alessandra Stanley
    Sep 24, 2013
    60
    Watching Mr. Williams return to the kind of improvisation-style routines that made him famous in the 1970s is bittersweet, like watching Jimmy Connors play tennis again: they are still impressive, but audiences can’t help recalling how much more elastic and powerful they were at their peak.
  18. Reviewed by: Joanne Ostrow
    Sep 11, 2013
    60
    The talented cast and upbeat pilot work in the series’ favor, but if the half-hour is to be more than a platform for Williams’ improv, the story will have to go deeper. And make us care.
  19. Reviewed by: Matt Roush
    Sep 26, 2013
    50
    The result is a mostly wan workplace sitcom hamstrung by the premise of yoking Williams to a wet-blanket daughter as business partner (Sarah Michelle Gellar, not exactly in her element). The co-star who really pops is James Wolk.
  20. Reviewed by: Alan Sepinwall
    Sep 25, 2013
    50
    Simon, Sydney and their colleagues work in a giant office that seems much too underpopulated, just as the first episode feels like a rough draft.
  21. Reviewed by: Erik Adams
    Sep 25, 2013
    50
    The episode has the propulsive pace of a CBS hour-long, but that can leave the fun parts of a single-camera sitcom (like the jokes) behind in its dust. Above all, The Crazy Ones is safe.
  22. Reviewed by: Maureen Ryan
    Sep 24, 2013
    50
    When Williams can rein in his hyper qualities, he can be an effective presence. And at least he knows his way around a joke, unlike Gellar, who, post-"Buffy," still hasn't risen above the level of the writing she's given (and the writing for her here is flat and one-dimensional).
  23. Reviewed by: Mark A. Perigard
    Sep 26, 2013
    42
    As a sitcom version of herself, the onetime “American Idol” outshines Gellar, which is not a good omen for the show. Williams seems ex­hausted. So is this show.
  24. Reviewed by: Verne Gay
    Sep 25, 2013
    42
    You hope for a laugh, pray for one, then give up. To be fair, tonight's pilot runs fast (19 minutes) and feels more like a "sizzle reel" than a fully formed show. Williams, at least, is a genius, and maybe he'll get the time to turn this into something worth watching.
  25. Reviewed by: Ed Bark
    Sep 25, 2013
    42
    The Crazy Ones may not be fall’s worst new comedy series, but its premiere episode easily is the biggest underachiever.
  26. 30
    It's not an unlikable show, but right off the bat I feel like I can't trust it.
  27. Reviewed by: Tim Goodman
    Sep 26, 2013
    30
    The Crazy Ones is part manic and part maudlin, neither emotion effective.
  28. Reviewed by: Brian Tallerico
    Sep 26, 2013
    20
    The whole thing is so poorly conceived and executed.... It’s a misfire for an undeniable TV talent.
User Score
6.5

Generally favorable reviews- based on 95 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 24
  2. Negative: 6 out of 24
  1. Sep 27, 2013
    10
    The pilot was really fast paced, the 20 minutes felt like 5 but I already love all the characters. Definitely Ally Mc Beal 2.0. A bunch of Crazy people with a lot of heart. Can't hardly wait to know them a little bit more and to explore their universe. All the actors have great chemistry together especially Robin Williams and Sarah Michelle Gellar. James Wolk was a nice revelation and on top of that Kelly Clarkson was hilarious. Yep, this is great TV. The show has so much potential, I hope the writers will meet my expectations. The next episodes should focus a little bit more on the father daughter relationship. This is where, IMO, The Crazy Ones could stand out of the crowd and became a nice "dramedy". Full Review »
  2. Sep 27, 2013
    4
    Two words to describe this whole episode...PRODUCT PLACEMENT. This show was about McDonalds trying to rebrand itself in light of all the negative publicity and Kelly Clarkston trying to get her name out there some more. Robin Williams was typical Robin Williams and Sarah Michelle Gellar was not good at all. The writing was horrible and the acting bad. The show was 20 minutes and I couldn't wait for it to get over. The whole storyline has been done a thousand times by a thousand different shows. Full Review »
  3. Oct 7, 2013
    10
    I'm usually leery of 30 minute shows with live audiences and/or canned laughter but there's nothing to worry about with The Crazy Ones. Robin Williams and Sarah Michelle Gellar along with the rest of the cast are absolutely wonderful! I find that Robin isn't over the top but still presents is fabulous sense of humor while the rest of the case have their own unique personalities that work well together and total heart. I'm looking forward to each episode and applaud the writers and actors for doing a wonderful job!!!! Full Review »