For 46 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Adam Lowes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 80 The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot
Lowest review score: 20 Eaten Alive
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 46
  2. Negative: 2 out of 46
46 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    What we are ultimately left with is a well-made, consummately-performed drama – Laura Linney shines in a small role as John’s equally exasperated younger sister – which unfortunately falls a little short of the intended emotional catharsis Mortensen is reaching for.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy is an affectionate and reverential look at a remarkable figure and a testament to her achievements within the Mexican culinary landscape.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Mystify: Michael Hutchence is an impeccably assembled, comprehensive tribute to a rock legend and is entirely worthy of being mentioned in the same breath as the aforementioned Winehouse doc.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot is a thoroughly enjoyable and sneakily touching oddity which is entirely worthy of a big screen outing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Chronicling the lives of himself and two friends from teenage years to young adulthood, director Bing Liu has crafted a rich coming-of-age odyssey which is, in turn, illuminating, sobering and ultimately uplifting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Ultimately, Anna and the Apocalypse ends up lacking the requisite bite to really make it fly as that quirky leftfield offering it so badly wants to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Even if it does occasionally threaten to outstay its welcome with a 111-minute running time, the deeply engaging performances and that freeing and uninhibited Spanish flavour which Marques-Marcet brings to his English-language debut, means it’s the kind of world you really don’t mind lingering in.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    While it’s obvious that fans of Lavelle and his many creative ventures will get the most out of The Man From Mo’Wax, this remains a fascinating insight into both the hubris and vulnerability of the music industry, which never shies away from casting it’s subject matter in a sometimes unfavourable light.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    At times the whole film threatens to turn into a visual stream of consciousness exercise which is a real shame, as Greenfield’s aims are entirely admirable and with merit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Skillfully mixing elements of horror while never alienating its core PG demographic, The 'Burbs also benefits from a wonderfully playful score by the late great Jerry Goldsmith. While the film bottles it slightly at the end with the obvious, neatly-tied-together resolution which would have benefited from maintaining an ambiguity, the enormous sense of fun established by Dante and his cast in the run-up more than makes up for any shortcomings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    We can all look forward to Hollywood completely dropping the ball with its inevitable remake, but until then, Train to Busan is the year's best genre offering by a zombie mile.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Richard Linklater once again casts his outwardly laid-back yet deceptively astute gaze on those loitering around the edge of adulthood with Everybody Wants Some!! - a joyous and often uproarious portrayal of college-age adolescence and the alluring freedom that brings.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Despite the best efforts of the filmmakers, In the Heart of the Sea is a few knots away from being the transformative cinema experience intended.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    You may have casually leafed through one of the photographer's books in the past, or even visited a gallery of this work, but this documentary is a must-see for anyone who has ever expressed an interest in this fascinating figure (and for those keen to witness what life is like on the other side of the lens).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    If Northern Soul loses its way a little as the duo's friendship starts to unravel, with Constantine working in some unwelcome and unnecessary melodrama, this is a minor blip in what is an otherwise joyous and air-punching affair.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Run All Night's saving grace is, unsurprisingly, its lead actor who remains as watchable as ever despite the material he has to work with.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Despite a liberal dose of full frontal nudity, The Canyons fails to fully revel in its sleaze, struggling to even work as a deadpan satire on the kind of vacuous and deadened Hollywood types Easton Ellis brought to life in the pages of his debut novel, Less Than Zero.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    At 100 minutes, the film runs dangerously close to outstaying its welcome, but like its subject matter, Diaz's Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey is both amiable and appealing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Impressive for the most part without being awe-inspiring, the film's two timelines converge in a much more satisfying and thrilling ways towards the end, where the emotional stakes are considerably upped.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 20 Adam Lowes
    Stands out as a prime example of what not to do when trying to construct a watertight feature-length narrative on the foundations of a simplistic platform game.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Over 60 years since its initial release, On Moonlight Bay remains a fun and charming snapshot of classic Hollywood.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Pit Stop certainly couldn’t be accused of being high art, but it’s a helluva lot of fun, offering an entertaining snapshot of that schlocky, drive-in era, complete with an unexpectedly dark ending which flies in the face of the usual heroic cinematic conventions.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    It's hokey as hell in parts, and the director sometimes shows an uncertainty in tone (resulting in some performances which are pitched a little too broadly) but those imperfections lend an endearing quality to the film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Pre-dating the release of Dennis Hopper’s 1969 American counter-culture classic Easy Rider by two years, Boorman’s Point Blank is also a very trippy, psychedelic affair. Marvin fending off two assailants behind the colourful, swirling backdrop of an avant-garde jazz gig is an evocative snapshot of that period, and just one of the many fetchingly abstract moments this strange and beguiling picture has to offer.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    The film‘s sparse narrative exists to simply connect one action set-piece to the next, with sporadic breathing space in between. It’s the kind of undemanding entertainment which was enthusiastically lapped up by viewers during the early video rental era.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    There’s an ironic detachment that permeates the dark fairy-tale atmosphere, and the performances are pitched to that heightened David Lynch-like caricature.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    With a ludicrous plot that wouldn’t look out of place in a 80s American Saturday morning kids cartoon, this is the very epitome of B-movie zaniness.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Budgetary restrictions offer a narrow visual scope which isn’t helped by the plodding, stagy pace (maddeningly slow at times).
    • 25 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    This third entry is undoubtedly the crowning glory in a series of films that could hardly be described as classics of the genre, yet are never anything less than gloriously entertaining.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    In many ways, Down by Law feels like the quintessential Jarmusch. It's a perfect distillation of that strange whimsy and resolutely deadpan humour - harvested via the director's life-long passion for world cinema.

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