For 30 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Adam Lowes' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 80 The 'Burbs
Lowest review score: 40 The Last American Virgin
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 30
  2. Negative: 0 out of 30
30 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot is a thoroughly enjoyable and sneakily touching oddity which is entirely worthy of a big screen outing.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Chronicling the lives of himself and two friends from teenage years to young adulthood, director Bing Liu has crafted a rich coming-of-age odyssey which is, in turn, illuminating, sobering and ultimately uplifting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Ultimately, Anna and the Apocalypse ends up lacking the requisite bite to really make it fly as that quirky leftfield offering it so badly wants to be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Even if it does occasionally threaten to outstay its welcome with a 111-minute running time, the deeply engaging performances and that freeing and uninhibited Spanish flavour which Marques-Marcet brings to his English-language debut, means it’s the kind of world you really don’t mind lingering in.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    While it’s obvious that fans of Lavelle and his many creative ventures will get the most out of The Man From Mo’Wax, this remains a fascinating insight into both the hubris and vulnerability of the music industry, which never shies away from casting it’s subject matter in a sometimes unfavourable light.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    At times the whole film threatens to turn into a visual stream of consciousness exercise which is a real shame, as Greenfield’s aims are entirely admirable and with merit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Skillfully mixing elements of horror while never alienating its core PG demographic, The 'Burbs also benefits from a wonderfully playful score by the late great Jerry Goldsmith. While the film bottles it slightly at the end with the obvious, neatly-tied-together resolution which would have benefited from maintaining an ambiguity, the enormous sense of fun established by Dante and his cast in the run-up more than makes up for any shortcomings.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    We can all look forward to Hollywood completely dropping the ball with its inevitable remake, but until then, Train to Busan is the year's best genre offering by a zombie mile.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Richard Linklater once again casts his outwardly laid-back yet deceptively astute gaze on those loitering around the edge of adulthood with Everybody Wants Some!! - a joyous and often uproarious portrayal of college-age adolescence and the alluring freedom that brings.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Despite the best efforts of the filmmakers, In the Heart of the Sea is a few knots away from being the transformative cinema experience intended.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    You may have casually leafed through one of the photographer's books in the past, or even visited a gallery of this work, but this documentary is a must-see for anyone who has ever expressed an interest in this fascinating figure (and for those keen to witness what life is like on the other side of the lens).
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    If Northern Soul loses its way a little as the duo's friendship starts to unravel, with Constantine working in some unwelcome and unnecessary melodrama, this is a minor blip in what is an otherwise joyous and air-punching affair.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Run All Night's saving grace is, unsurprisingly, its lead actor who remains as watchable as ever despite the material he has to work with.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    Despite a liberal dose of full frontal nudity, The Canyons fails to fully revel in its sleaze, struggling to even work as a deadpan satire on the kind of vacuous and deadened Hollywood types Easton Ellis brought to life in the pages of his debut novel, Less Than Zero.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    At 100 minutes, the film runs dangerously close to outstaying its welcome, but like its subject matter, Diaz's Don't Stop Believin': Everyman's Journey is both amiable and appealing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Impressive for the most part without being awe-inspiring, the film's two timelines converge in a much more satisfying and thrilling ways towards the end, where the emotional stakes are considerably upped.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    It's hokey as hell in parts, and the director sometimes shows an uncertainty in tone (resulting in some performances which are pitched a little too broadly) but those imperfections lend an endearing quality to the film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    In many ways, Down by Law feels like the quintessential Jarmusch. It's a perfect distillation of that strange whimsy and resolutely deadpan humour - harvested via the director's life-long passion for world cinema.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Add to the mix gregarious powerhouse producer Dino De Laurentiis, plus regular Redford directorial collaborator Sydney Pollock and, unsurprisingly, the resulting film is a cracking thriller.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    It’s the committed turn from Day-Lewis and Hanif Kureishi’s socially-astute, Oscar-nominated screenplay that manages to compensate for the film’s technical shortcomings, alongside the (then) landmark casual representation of a gay relationship on screen.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Streets of Fire is fairly devoid of anything resembling a cohesive plot or lacking even a shred of subtext. It exists purely as pop action cinema, sweeping you up with a fevered enthusiasm and an overpowering desire to entertain which proves incredibly difficult to resist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    There’s an ironic detachment that permeates the dark fairy-tale atmosphere, and the performances are pitched to that heightened David Lynch-like caricature.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    In an age where many horror franchises attempt to adhere as close to the original film’s formula as possible, Hooper’s The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 is a fun reminder of a time when makers were able to rewrite their own rules and go for broke. This was never going to top what had gone before, and by acknowledging that, the filmmakers have crafted a wonderfully demented alternative in its place.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Adam Lowes
    A grandiose title which suggests some kind of a smutty coming-of-age epic, but in reality only manages to deliver the grubby goods sporadically.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Hard Times may not have grown in stature to the extent where it will be mentioned by fans in the same breath as the director’s more revered titles, but it’s certainly worth a punt and is an absolute must for Hill completists.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Pink Flamingos remains a delightfully repugnant cinematic treasure. Watching Divine as she struts her stuff amongst the genuinely dumbfounded residents of downtown Baltimore, perfectly encapsulates with Waters was reaching for with the film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Richard Marquand opts largely for more intimate surrounding and manages to squeeze out some memorable moments of Hitchcockian suspense and tension.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Adam Lowes
    Pit Stop certainly couldn’t be accused of being high art, but it’s a helluva lot of fun, offering an entertaining snapshot of that schlocky, drive-in era, complete with an unexpectedly dark ending which flies in the face of the usual heroic cinematic conventions.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Unlike some of the other blaxploitation titles from that time, Foxy Brown is more than just a curio piece. That’s partly down to its iconic lead, but it’s also due to a strong feminist attitude which exists within that riotous, eager-to-entertain, exploitation framework.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Adam Lowes
    Like the best films from its genre, Seconds acts as a potent parable and posits an intriguing idea.

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