For 18 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Aisha Harris' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 Girls Trip
Lowest review score: 20 Peppermint
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 18
  2. Negative: 1 out of 18
18 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Aisha Harris
    If the story is familiar, the storytelling can be immersive — Batra shades in the leads and their worlds with a human specificity that makes Photograph compelling in a slice-of-life way, particularly regarding class in India.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Aisha Harris
    The squelching of promise is not my worst (cinematic) fear, per se. But it’s still disappointing.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Aisha Harris
    It all adds up to a film aiming to be a moving character study (and an ostensible homage to Agnés Varda’s “Cléo From 5 to 7,” a far more vivid exploration of existentialism), but instead feels adrift.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Aisha Harris
    The ballet dancer Misty Copeland, who makes a brief appearance during the film and in the closing credits, is the highlight, gracefully unhindered by silly dialogue in two dance sequences.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Aisha Harris
    While the story plays a bit with the notion of the supernatural, the spirit foregrounded here is more tangible: an ominous sense of restlessness and curtailed dreams.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Aisha Harris
    Ms. Stenberg, Mr. Hornsby and others in the ensemble (including Regina Hall as Starr’s mother, Lisa) are more than capable of exploring their characters’ depths, but a wonky script gets them only so far.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Aisha Harris
    Often it feels like reading a Twitter thread of ideas and hashtags, rather than watching a movie. Yet the final act, a “Purge”-like blood bath to the tune of vengeance, is aesthetically arresting.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Aisha Harris
    Peppermint is a belabored exercise in lazily constructed déjà vu, without the grit or stylized ham of predecessors it so baldly steals from.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Aisha Harris
    The combination of clever concept reflecting the prevalence of screens in everyday life, and the pleasure of watching a typically underused Mr. Cho take on a meaty lead role make Searching a satisfying psychological thriller.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Aisha Harris
    This might seem a quaint revelation, but it proves to be a powerful one. Learning that even Mr. Rogers questioned whether one man could make a difference is both heartening and saddening, enough to bring out in the viewer an overwhelming mix of emotions.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Aisha Harris
    I Feel Pretty has more nuance than the trailer suggests. Unfortunately, those shades of meaning get mangled up in nonsensical plot contrivances and tired running jokes. If it’s offensive, it’s because of its blandness, not its political incorrectness.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Aisha Harris
    For all of Wrinkle’s unevenness, DuVernay still manages to draw out some glimpses of more intimate beauty, the kind that one expects from the filmmaker.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Aisha Harris
    A uniformly excellent cast and some genuinely moving moments make Landline easy to fall for.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Aisha Harris
    Girls Trip more than delivers what its audience is looking for.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Aisha Harris
    While much of the original script remains the same, screenwriters Steven Chbosky and Evan Spiliotopoulos, as well as long-time Disney composer Alan Menken (who also wrote for the original, along with the late Howard Ashman), sprinkle in just enough new material and character development to help it feel fresh.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Aisha Harris
    Director Darrell Roodt’s by-the-numbers biopic suffers from clunky dialogue and shallow characterization, all while never deciding what to make of its leading lady.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Aisha Harris
    The Time Being is a visual pleasure, with Cicin-Sain unveiling shot after shot of glorious landscapes and striking silhouettes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Aisha Harris
    Cordero and screenwriter Philip Gelatt demonstrate a deft understanding of how to handle a found-footage narrative without making it too familiar.

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