Alan Scherstuhl

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For 722 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 A Bread Factory Part Two: Walk With Me a While
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 47 out of 722
722 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Rohrwacher’s work unites a passionate interest in social realism, in the hardships faced by people on the streets and in the fields, with a daring refusal to be held by the rules of narrative realism.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Often, a scene-survey doc that takes on so much — cultural history, present-day portraiture, regional distinctions, celebrity interviews, fly-on-the-wall reportage — can play as scattershot. That’s not so with United Skates. Round and round it flows — why not jump on in?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Firth is all panicked reserve in the role of Crowhurst, and Rachel Weisz invests the familiar stay-at-home role with antsy, agonized spirit as the wife of the doomed man, facing the truth that her family’s lives will never be what they once were.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    It’s a Rocky movie, just the latest go-round, its story more formulaic, its people less specific, its rhythms as wheezily familiar as a workout you should have changed up weeks ago. It’s a diminishment of Creed, a dumbing down, just as Rocky II was a diminishment of Rocky.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film unfolds as a sort of first-person procedural, a vivid step-by-step account of a reporting trip to hell.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too often, viewers just have to take a movie love story’s word for it that its characters actually belong together. Not so in Carlos Marques-Marcet’s loose, observant Anchor and Hope.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    El Angel is a crime spree as improvised reverie, one with a subject who is as quick to give away his loot as the director is to make the subtext explicit.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Little here will surprise cineastes but much of it will charm them.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    The acting is stiff, the pacing sluggish, the framing uncertain, the music an intrusive mush and the scenario schematic. But it’s an interesting schematic, at least, complete with thoughtful/exhaustive discussion of the difference between justice, revenge and forgiveness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    When Jared finally erupts, Hedges nimbly navigates the character’s hurt, fear and burgeoning pride — his relief at having at last found his voice.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Wiseman doesn’t engage with immigration or migrant labor in his town portrait, which helps make Monrovia, Indiana a stubborn entry into his canon. Many of his subjects are invested in the continuity of what they perceive as a timeless American normalcy, but they’re too polite — and cagey — to say what that means on camera.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Especially wrenching are scenes of the Yazidi, torn from the land of their birth, separated from one another in camps, confronting the question of how to remain unified when scattered across the globe.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 10 Alan Scherstuhl
    Mathew Cullen’s calamitous film adaptation of Martin Amis’ London Fields plays like the hazy recollection of someone who hated the book, an incomprehensible jumble of misogynistic claptrap. It dashes joylessly through dense material, too quickly for individual moments to register, much less resonate.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It’s a relaxed study of greatness, of exquisite physical comedy, of how’d-he-do-that stuntwork, of a vigorous cinema artist who saw new and enduring possibilities for his medium.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film, a sort of cinematic state-of-the-arts speech, is endlessly warm, playful and lovable, a sprawling and prankish hangout comedy with no clear precedent.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The second half proves somewhat darker but also more brazenly inventive in its scene craft. If Part One centered on the role of the arts in the lives of these characters and their community, Part Two finds their lives becoming art. Suddenly, song-and-dance numbers break out in parking lots and coffee shops.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film might prove more illuminating and instructive if it examined more reactions to Kroc’s flowering from within the lifting world. Overall, though, Del Monte has crafted a warm portrait of the birth of a woman from a man who found that he had even more strength than he ever realized.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    The family squabbles jangle the nerves while not hitting on insights or memorable emotion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dano’s film is shrewd and exacting, composed with rigor yet alert to the rhythms of its performers.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Here’s a true surprise in 2018: a documentary about an American injustice that will likely leave you, by its end, blubbering tears of relieved joy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Helped along by news clips, the filmmakers do better with the crash-and-burn business story than with the actuality of the Studio experience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Kindergarten Teacher dares us to work out for ourselves, from moment to moment, whether Lisa is a hero, a monster or something in-between
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    While watching the film, I not only laughed a lot and gasped oh, shit! in the right places. I somehow never once found myself tempted to sneak a peek at my phone to check in on our real American hellscape.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Hate U Give takes time to focus on the nuances of Starr’s life, on the effort of code-switching, on the layers of self that Starr must sort through in everyday interactions.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Double-stuffed with kill squads, killer ’80s couture and mood-killing howlers, Fernando Leon de Aranoa’s Loving Pablo is more a greatest hits than a story, the kind of radically compressed life-of-a-legend movie where everything happens in a giddy, ridiculous gush — except for when it slows down to dwell on horrors.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Jenkins (director of The Savages and Slums of Beverly Hills) is always more interested in emotional truth than she is in laughs. Throughout Private Life’s tense 124 minutes, she continually achieves both.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Rather than a tragic inevitability or a comic detachment, the final scenes have about them the whiff of resignation, possibly meaningful or possibly not.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    To watch Honnold think through each ledge of his climbs can stop the heart; to watch him navigate human emotion might melt it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    As her marriage opens up, and Colette begins to take lovers of her own, Knightley summons up a moving sense of both relief and recklessness. This Colette is thrilled suddenly to have new options, but she’s committed to pushing for more.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    While sometimes messy, this material is emotionally resonant and cinematically alive.

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