Alan Scherstuhl

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For 441 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 It's a Disaster
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 34 out of 441
441 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's not news, of course, that it's a terrible thing to extinguish a life, but it's a relief, when the shoot-'em-ups of Summer Movie Season are bearing down on us, to see a film that regards killing with pained awe. Wladyka's hands are clean.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Levan Gabriadze is adept at the sinking something's not right creepiness too few horror films dig into. His techniques are certain to be copy-pasted by imitators.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    What makes Güeros fascinating, besides the joyous invention of Ruizpalacios's craft, is how the director emphasizes rather than hides his own authorial engagement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Fontaine handles the assignations with sympathetic shorthand — we see what Martin sees, but we see more, too, enough to understand that Gemma's dalliances are vital to her but not overwhelming. She has a handle on them.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Challenging viewers this way — denying clean resolutions, chucking out the urgent drama of the first hour of movie — is bound to alienate some audiences. But from its arresting first scenes, Phang's film is as much about why? as it is what next?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Directors Shawn Rech and Brandon Kimber piece the story together via fresh interviews, vintage footage, and too many iffy reenactments and close-ups of news stories. But the matter here transcends the artlessness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is an adventure, a reason to despair, a chance to hang out with a great talker, and an often beautiful portrait of this city's promise and cruelty.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Moments of pain and revelation keep coming, all varied and surprising. These accrete into a mountain of evidence for Sauper's thesis: South Sudan might be new, but the forces shaping it are the same that have damned Africans for centuries — the rest of the world's lust for resources and conversions. That everything is beautiful just makes it hurt all the more.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film, with its traditional mix of talking heads and vintage footage, does not try to hide the Panthers' advocacy of violence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Stirring, sad, and at times truly frightening.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is more closing argument than portrait of life in the downturn, but it's thrillingly vigorous in its damning.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Inevitably, this tense comedy dips into tragedy, with our fearful intelligence agencies getting everything wrong and the filmmakers using their rare access to chart each mistake as it happens.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    In Sichel's inspired conceit, the self-reflexive truth-through-fiction ethos of the Iranian New Wave meets a sensitive documentary exploration of trying to live at the ends of life.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Allah, a street photographer of deserved renown, has achieved something here beyond the familiar documentary impulse to show us the people who live on the streets. His immersive, unsettling techniques dig at a sense of what it might feel like to be among them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film's brittle and quiet, on occasion touched with the techniques of horror, especially as Helena stalks her store after hours. It's also trenchant, stinging, and acted with great frumping subtlety.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story spins out in painful directions that feel surprising yet inevitable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's an honest and incisive and peppery examination of one of his life's strangest but most enduring relationships — and the way that timidity and kindness often work out to being the same thing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kent Jones's documentary take on François Truffaut's exhaustive career-survey 1966 interview with Alfred Hitchcock is an arresting précis, sharply edited and generous with its film clips — it's a smashing supplement to Truffaut's classic study.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Finlay tells this story with the usual doc techniques. The interviews are marvelous, especially the ones with Ellis's exes, who attest not just to his weakness for groupies but to his collection of trophies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The usual doc mix of interviews and vintage photos is moving and surprisingly funny.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sorrentino, as always, invests his scenarios with a feeling and beauty that transcends the dreary specifics
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film stands as a reminder of how much it can mean just to listen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    This isn't hard-times reportage or a deep-dive ethnography. It's a life-as-it's-lived picture, a chance to meet and loiter with the people in the places the interstates zip past.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Last Man on the Moon puts you there and then asks why in the world we haven't gone back.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The result is something like the best science-fair project ever, an inviting performance piece that tasks viewers with the pleasurable, imaginative engagement that more seamless special effects deny.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    At first the stakes are as light yet rich as Sentaro's pancakes; then come marvelous cine-essays on bean-soaking and paste-prepping, plus — in the film's tragedy-tinged final third — a change-of-seasons montage for the ages.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Skipping across ages and genres, this cine-essay beguilement from Russian Ark director Alexander Sokurov considers the Louvre — and the miracle of the transmission of art and culture across its history.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A feat of workplace naturalism.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Last Days is weighty and somber, familiar and strange, in the way of Bible stories but not of contemporary faith-based filmmaking, which eschews mystery and paradox for homily.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Will Allen's sunny gut-punch cult exposé Holy Hell plays like a thriller, all right, with a darkness edging slowly over its swimsuit revelry, but Allen never cheats in the interest of suspense.