Alan Scherstuhl

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For 522 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Neon Bull
Lowest review score: 0 The Red Pill
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 40 out of 522
522 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A Walk Among the Tombstones is an uncommonly well-made thriller.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Of Horses and Men is often sprightly, and almost every shot is an eyeful.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film's brittle and quiet, on occasion touched with the techniques of horror, especially as Helena stalks her store after hours. It's also trenchant, stinging, and acted with great frumping subtlety.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    David M. Rosenthal's sturdy, nasty rural noir, based on Matthew F. Jones's novel, is so sharp and rusted through that, after taking it in, you'll likely need a tetanus shot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Eastwood may never show us his boys discovering themselves under that street lamp, but he gives us a clutch of moments worth treasuring — and mostly without overdoing it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Challenging viewers this way — denying clean resolutions, chucking out the urgent drama of the first hour of movie — is bound to alienate some audiences. But from its arresting first scenes, Phang's film is as much about why? as it is what next?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The directors shot over the course of years, and they put epochal moments on the screen, including a 2007 battle between protesters and police that left more than ten of each dead.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    From moment to moment, this Last Five Years is a robust entertainment, often stirring, sad, and funny.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Directors Shawn Rech and Brandon Kimber piece the story together via fresh interviews, vintage footage, and too many iffy reenactments and close-ups of news stories. But the matter here transcends the artlessness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sorrentino, as always, invests his scenarios with a feeling and beauty that transcends the dreary specifics
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Poitras shows us history as it happens, scenes of such intimate momentousness that the movie's a must-see piece of work even if, in its totality, it's underwhelming as argument or cinema.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    In Sichel's inspired conceit, the self-reflexive truth-through-fiction ethos of the Iranian New Wave meets a sensitive documentary exploration of trying to live at the ends of life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    That patience of Reichardt's, and her dedication to showing us exclusively the things that we must see, makes the scenes of preparation — boat parking, fertilizer buying — hypnotic and suspenseful and practical all at once.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A feat of workplace naturalism.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kopple's film is intimate and rousing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The scale of the occasional mayhem is heightened, but its spirit and ingenuity doesn't feel wholly at odds with the books.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's part Live at Birdland, part Boy in the Plastic Bubble, all warmly thrilling.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The result is something like the best science-fair project ever, an inviting performance piece that tasks viewers with the pleasurable, imaginative engagement that more seamless special effects deny.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    At first the stakes are as light yet rich as Sentaro's pancakes; then come marvelous cine-essays on bean-soaking and paste-prepping, plus — in the film's tragedy-tinged final third — a change-of-seasons montage for the ages.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Richard LaGravenese, who also adapted the novel, lavishes the material with greater wit than its demographic demands, and the central love story feels warm-blooded—the air prickles between the leads.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    In those days after the misbegotten verdict in the trial of the four police officers who kicked and beat Rodney King, these Angelenos discovered what they and their neighbors were capable of. Ridley’s patient, humane approach allows us, over his film’s 145 minutes, to discover it, too.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Newell's film doesn't supplant Lean's, of course. The yearning is more vague, the gloom less consummate. But it's the best since, rich in feeling and dark beauty, alive with the superior scenecraft, chatter, and imagination of the most beloved of novelists.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Thomas White's lost-and-found avant-lulu Who's Crazy? pulses with the newly possible.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's an honest and incisive and peppery examination of one of his life's strangest but most enduring relationships — and the way that timidity and kindness often work out to being the same thing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kudos to the filmmakers for so adeptly laying out the history of American evangelicals' Ugandan mission, and for noting that HIV infection rates there have gone up since the abstinence-only education started.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The funny stuff outweighs the cock-ups, and supporting performances from Stephen Merchant and Minnie Driver kick the movie toward something grander.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kent Jones's documentary take on François Truffaut's exhaustive career-survey 1966 interview with Alfred Hitchcock is an arresting précis, sharply edited and generous with its film clips — it's a smashing supplement to Truffaut's classic study.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Milos's film pulses with f#*!-it-all abandon and chintzy eastern-Euro club beats.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story works out like you might expect. The joys are in the way director Breck Eisner, like Diesel, is earnest about this goofiness. His direction might not showcase the full wit of the script, but it does honor its inventiveness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Jason Silverman and Samba Gadjigo's heartfelt doc is rich in footage and access.