Alan Zilberman

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For 69 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Zilberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Little Stranger
Lowest review score: 0 Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 69
  2. Negative: 16 out of 69
69 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    A slight, yet inoffensive tale, inspiring little more than a shrug, thereby making it hard to either wholeheartedly endorse or strongly criticize.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 37 Alan Zilberman
    The movie is like a game of musical chairs that runs too long. And since Muschietti has few scare tactics at his disposal, the film loses its capacity to frighten.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    On one level, Brian’s story is meant to be inspirational; the real Banks would ultimately go on to play in the NFL. But it is also a painful reminder of how young black people still face overwhelming disadvantages. The film leaves you wondering: What might have happened if Brian hadn’t been a talented linebacker?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Morrison, at 88, is as clear-eyed and sharp as ever. What’s most surprising about her interviews is not her candor, but her humor, revealed, as she speaks, in a way that makes you want to lean closer. (Her gifts as a storyteller are not just on the page.)
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    Unlike the traditional issue-driven documentary, which typically unfolds like a newsreel, this one plays like a thrilling jungle adventure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    While the details of Nureyev’s 1961 defection in Paris are thrilling, the film falls into the trap of many historical dramas, rendering the story as surprisingly clunky, especially considering the nimbleness of its subjects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Pacing notwithstanding, Fast Color succeeds on the strength of its ideas.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 37 Alan Zilberman
    Marshall and screenwriter Andrew Cosby went overboard with their R-rating, introducing so much gore and profanity that it, quite frankly, gets dull. The flat performances and incoherent story do not help matters.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    McCarthy is not (yet) a celebrated director, but The Prodigy may change that. As with his under-seen debut film “The Pact,” his greatest asset here is his patience, followed by his evocative use of light, shadow and negative space. He’s a filmmaker who recognizes that the buildup is more fun than the payoff, and he manages to generate suspense with seemingly little happening on the screen.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 37 Alan Zilberman
    Good intentions only go so far, especially when they mask tawdry melodrama. Even the best movies push emotional buttons, but they work because viewers become wrapped up in the story. This one is so manipulative you can hear the gears grinding — until they lock up.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 12 Alan Zilberman
    “Chaos” might have been better had the filmmaker revisited his interview subjects now that we are deep into Trump’s presidency. But that would have required additional work. If the film is a testament to anything, it’s Stern’s laziness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Zilberman
    As a director, Abrahamson uses that sense of the detached observer as a scalpel, whittling away at our expectations of horror films until we have no choice but to look at — and really listen to — what is happening. It’s an approach that requires patience, on his part and ours, but the rewards are worth it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    The result is an unabashedly violent B-movie throwback, the sort director John Carpenter used to make, with moments that resonate with real life.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Zilberman
    This shrewdly observed story asks another question: Is civilization possible in a nation where discrimination has such deep roots? In Sweet Country, the answer arrives with a tough fatalism.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    It is not exactly a thriller, yet its plausibility will inspire very real anxiety.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    The Kennedy dynasty has its share of admirers and critics alike, and — to the film’s credit — director John Curran and his screenwriters do not appease either camp. The result is a challenging character study, punctuated by moments of uneasy suspense and dark humor.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    This is a film that encapsulates the anxiety of the present moment, complicated by friendships that lean, at times, toward outright hostility.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Nothing about this film feels remotely safe. Unlike the “Fifty Shades” series, Double Lover has little interest in romance, instead considering the psychological impulses that inform it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    No Greater Love gets at the camaraderie — and the contradictions — of military service in a way that few films ever have.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Writer-director Jason Hall astutely conveys these and other facets of the modern veteran’s experience, generating authentic drama, in scenes that play out in unexpected ways.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    The story by screenwriter William Nicholson (“Everest”) jumps from one major episode in Robin’s life to another, but with none of those episodes delving into his interior life, Breathe remains a superficial tear-jerker.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Director Reginald Hudlin handles the story with just enough finesse to make its details more thrilling than uneasy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 63 Alan Zilberman
    Defiantly inscrutable, Woodshock can test a viewer’s patience, yet the filmmakers’ consistent self-confidence creates an alluring, oddly hypnotic effect.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    Despite flashes of brilliance, strong performances and innovative camera techniques, the film never rises above the schmaltz of an after-school special.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    This is slow, almost languid filmmaking, yet it’s a delight to watch the countless ways in which the library is still capable of lifting us.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Zilberman
    Without a clear narrative, the story recedes in the face of the movie’s stylized violence — which is, admittedly, glorious, even brazen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    “Corner” is a deeply sympathetic tale, using the possibilities of animation not just to pique curiosity, but to devastate.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Alan Zilberman
    By focusing on the details of his characters’ lives, Weinstein finds common ground on both sides of the religious divide.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Alan Zilberman
    From the Land of the Moon features a typical Cotillard performance, yet the romance, from French actress and filmmaker Nicole Garcia, manages to convey neither triumph nor tragedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Alan Zilberman
    Strange Weather is wise about loss, showing the ripple effects of an untimely death. It is hardly an original concept, yet it handles this subject with the care and integrity it deserves.

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