For 71 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alex McLevy's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Mosaic: Season 1
Lowest review score: 42 The Bite: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 57 out of 71
  2. Negative: 0 out of 71
71 tv reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Servant may have dialed back the inspired wackiness of its second season, but by stripping away the campy bells and bizarro whistles, it’s found a nice mix of silly and sinister—a show that gets in, gooses the audience repeatedly with an acidic smile, and gets out.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    In the era of explainer videos for every subject and stylized true-crime reenactments on a hundred channels, the only real difference here is slightly better production values. ... Slim but mostly engaging docuseries.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    It’s a terrific documentary portrait, but strangely, it might have benefitted from there being somewhat less of it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    This season stumbles a bit, especially in the early episodes, going over the top with a commitment to shock-value one-liners and gonzo predicaments that grows wearying. (At one point, Nick even calls out his old-man hormone monster, Rick, for being exceptionally disturbing.) But once it finds its groove around episode four, the series’ endearing mix of true-to-life relatability and absurdist extremes returns.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Does it make much sense? No. But it’s fun to see it play out with a mischievous sense of anything-goes silliness. Mancini and Dourif have been doing this for so long, they seem to have nailed down an understanding of what makes Chucky fun. And when Chucky [the series] follows suit, it is too.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Doom Patrol has learned the lesson that pathos not need require a morose tone. The show is at its finest when these flawed and funny people are allowed to be uproarious even when they’re in pain.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Ultimately, Kin isn’t going to reinvent the wheel, or offer much beyond some solid direction and the familiar beats of a mob potboiler. (There is a wrinkle to Cox’s character introduced in episode three that suggests there may be at least one semi-novel element to this story.) Instead, it’s simply an opportunity to watch some gifted actors do what they do, very well, with a story that glides along in entertaining but unoriginal manner. ... The performances keep Kin engaging.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    For those who don’t mind the loopy, meandering not-quite-real-ness of it all, Cherry Flavor makes for an engagingly offbeat affair. And no, that title is never once explained nor justified.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    It’s not for everyone, but for those with a passion for songcraft, or a love of McCartney’s music, McCartney 3, 2, 1 is a source of wonder, compelling and compassionate.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    A lot of this feels like prologue to the real story, a first chapter to a much broader, more fleshed-out tale that has all put all the pieces in place that it takes the concluding episode of this season to reach. Luckily, the charismatic cast and a sure-footed command of story beats keep it on the right side of plodding. With a winning (and occasionally brutal) approach to its darkly fantastical imaginings, Sweet Tooth find a nice balance between its sugary and bitter elements.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 42 Alex McLevy
    The Bite starts off clumsy and only gets worse, with those highlights mentioned above the rare exceptions. It’s satire without a clear target, drama without weight, and comedy without a very good sense of humor.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Solar Opposites’ second season is a heaping helping of everything from the first season, but spread even thicker; whether or not the increasingly snide perspective its characters share will get even harsher in season three is a question even the denizens of the Wall can’t foresee.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Thanks to the cast, there’s still some charming grit in the cogs of what’s become a predictably smooth form of reality-TV blandness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    That uneven hit-to-miss ratio means Resident Alien is only fitfully entertaining, at least for now. Whenever Tudyk or Wetterlund (or both, in the show’s best scenes) are onscreen, the show generally shines, remaining funny and engaging despite the odd stumble.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Season two does possess a much surer sense of blackly absurdist humor about its ever more outlandish story. Whereas the comedy often previously came from the belief-beggaring state of affairs themselves, the show now wisely leans into the aggressively heightened performances of its leads.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    There are still more than a few moments of badly engineered plotting and situations that leave you dumbfounded none of these kids have called the police; but Cobra Kai isn’t trying to score points for believability. Season three pummels you with enough broad laughs and over-the-top twists to keep you coming back to its televised dojo, no matter how often it backslides into hokum.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    As it races to introduce a whole host of characters and motivations in the first half-hour, The Comey Rule struggles under the burden of trying to explain who all these people are, and what role they play in the proceedings. But once we get into the fraught nature of the Clinton investigation—and just as the team, including Comey’s new second-in-command, Andrew McCabe (a superb Michael Kelly), realizes they’re standing on a land mine of partisan undermining of the FBI—the story gets compelling.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Alex McLevy
    As a whole, the second season of The Boys is a solid improvement on the first: Smarter, sharper, and more engaged with its stories and characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    The film effectively traces the birth of the modern all-fundraising-all-the-time elected official, but what it doesn’t do is offer anything in the way of new ideas. In fact, it’s pretty clear what needs to be done—and the film all too plainly points out why it’s not likely to happen. What The Swamp does offer is a look at the day-to-day work of three representatives whose more complicated stances on governmental integrity may surprise Democrats and leftists used to doing nothing but demonizing them.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Alex McLevy
    Like its spotty progenitors, Ju-On: Origins tries to stretch thin material over a large canvas without doing much to sustain interest beyond injecting the occasional fright. (To its credit, there are almost no cheap jump scares here.)
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    In its early going, Doom Patrol’s second season sacrifices too much joy on the altar of its heroes’ troubled psyches, without enough chances to savor their unusual charms—or marvel at the oddities continually swirling around them. For its first few episodes, DC’s strange and engaging drama feels more like Doom And Gloom Patrol.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Patton Oswalt is changing into a different, more empathetic type of comedian, but for those willing to follow along on his new path, there are ample rewards.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Solar Opposites is winningly small-scale in its stand-alone episodic ambitions. Burning through plot at a voracious pace, each installment can be enjoyed on its own madcap merits.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Future Man finds a decent denouement to close out its triptych of seasons, and those who enjoyed past installments won’t be let down by this one. If only all that traveling through space and time could have found a more richly developed series.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Alex McLevy
    Given the entire story feels like it came out of a time capsule from 1987, it shouldn’t be surprising that the execution is as outdated as the material. Jessica Sharzer’s script is twee and pat, with characters that feel more like old Disney cartoons than flesh-and-blood people. Pedretti and O’Brien are solid, doing their best with underwritten roles, but their characters’ stories play out with all the excitement and passion of an after-school special about the importance of following your dreams.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Briarpatch has a wonderful cast and some inspired ideas; if it can slow down and figure out a more elegant way to deliver its fusion of icy cool and ramshackle quirk, St. Boniface will become a wry and appealing place for viewers to put down some roots.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Alex McLevy
    The show keeps things moving, so it never gets too bogged down in teen angst or ponderous speechifying. But by the penultimate episode, viewers will be wishing Ragnarok would hurry up and resolve its central plot, or at least give a better reason to come back for more. Even at a mere six episodes (five of which were available for review), it feels like a two-hour YA movie expanded past its breaking point.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    If only the narrative were up to the task of meeting the show’s witty and elastic visuals. Strip away the window dressing, and there’s not a lot of heart or complexity to Reprisal’s attempt to turn the wronged-woman trope into a broader universe capable of sustaining itself for multiple seasons. ... Still, it’s engaging in a pulpy, soapy way, fun despite its messy structure and slippery consistency.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Alex McLevy
    It takes a little time to find its whip-smart footing, with the pilot trying too hard to make everyone sound clever for clever’s sake and some hoary speechifying, but once it gets going, The Morning Show has the addictive rush of great old-school TV dramas. Funny, biting, and with just the right dose of trashy zing, this is high-gloss soap—Broadcast News meets L.A. Law.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    The Spy never quite manages to rise to the level of its excellent lead actors, but ends up being a satisfying depiction of one of the more unusual success stories of international espionage.

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