For 51 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alex McLevy's Scores

Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Mosaic: Season 1
Lowest review score: 42 Midnight, Texas: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 39 out of 51
  2. Negative: 0 out of 51
51 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    In its early going, Doom Patrol’s second season sacrifices too much joy on the altar of its heroes’ troubled psyches, without enough chances to savor their unusual charms—or marvel at the oddities continually swirling around them. For its first few episodes, DC’s strange and engaging drama feels more like Doom And Gloom Patrol.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Patton Oswalt is changing into a different, more empathetic type of comedian, but for those willing to follow along on his new path, there are ample rewards.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Solar Opposites is winningly small-scale in its stand-alone episodic ambitions. Burning through plot at a voracious pace, each installment can be enjoyed on its own madcap merits.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Future Man finds a decent denouement to close out its triptych of seasons, and those who enjoyed past installments won’t be let down by this one. If only all that traveling through space and time could have found a more richly developed series.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Alex McLevy
    Given the entire story feels like it came out of a time capsule from 1987, it shouldn’t be surprising that the execution is as outdated as the material. Jessica Sharzer’s script is twee and pat, with characters that feel more like old Disney cartoons than flesh-and-blood people. Pedretti and O’Brien are solid, doing their best with underwritten roles, but their characters’ stories play out with all the excitement and passion of an after-school special about the importance of following your dreams.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Briarpatch has a wonderful cast and some inspired ideas; if it can slow down and figure out a more elegant way to deliver its fusion of icy cool and ramshackle quirk, St. Boniface will become a wry and appealing place for viewers to put down some roots.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Alex McLevy
    The show keeps things moving, so it never gets too bogged down in teen angst or ponderous speechifying. But by the penultimate episode, viewers will be wishing Ragnarok would hurry up and resolve its central plot, or at least give a better reason to come back for more. Even at a mere six episodes (five of which were available for review), it feels like a two-hour YA movie expanded past its breaking point.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    If only the narrative were up to the task of meeting the show’s witty and elastic visuals. Strip away the window dressing, and there’s not a lot of heart or complexity to Reprisal’s attempt to turn the wronged-woman trope into a broader universe capable of sustaining itself for multiple seasons. ... Still, it’s engaging in a pulpy, soapy way, fun despite its messy structure and slippery consistency.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 83 Alex McLevy
    It takes a little time to find its whip-smart footing, with the pilot trying too hard to make everyone sound clever for clever’s sake and some hoary speechifying, but once it gets going, The Morning Show has the addictive rush of great old-school TV dramas. Funny, biting, and with just the right dose of trashy zing, this is high-gloss soap—Broadcast News meets L.A. Law.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    The Spy never quite manages to rise to the level of its excellent lead actors, but ends up being a satisfying depiction of one of the more unusual success stories of international espionage.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Alex McLevy
    Nitpicking sci-fi conceits is usually a waste of time (who cares how implausible a lovestruck robot fixing a ship’s FTL drive is?), but there are enough glaring omissions of logic in Another Life that it’s impossible not to get pulled out of the story at times. ... What the series does have is Sackhoff, and she’s more than up to the task of reminding the viewer why she’s anchoring this series. Whenever she’s onscreen, the show’s sophomoric writing instantly becomes more plausible
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    The Loudest Voice blends West Wing-style operatics with a darker narrative about power most corrupting those who were already corrupt, and if it lacks Sorkin’s gift for whip-crack pacing, its excellent cast and dependable focus on the machinations of backroom deals keeps it fleet and engaging.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    The ambition is admirable. Episodes will jump forward and backward in time, teasing out elements of story in ways not often seen on television, and helping to keep the endless J.J. Abrams-style mystery-box tactics of the show from getting overly tiresome.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Alex McLevy
    It’s not until the second-to-last episode that anything approaching the goofball charm and wit of its freshman season arrives, and by then the entire narrative is so weighed down with the baggage of its sudsy dramatics that the show feels less like a witty relaunch of a beloved film, and more like a 2019 version of Beverly Hills, 90210 (but not, you know, the 2019 version of Beverly Hills, 90210), complete with hokey music sequences and soap opera-level plotting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    [The season premiere] does a lot of work in a short amount of time, but unlike some previous episodes that engaged in significant table setting, it never feels too rushed or like characters are being given short shrift in the effort to hurry to the next beat. It plays as elegant, for the most part.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Alex McLevy
    There’s a lackadaisical appeal to the whole thing. Its ramshackle pacing and generic riffs on dude-bro mentality manage to emit a shaggy-dog charm, largely on the basis of its likable cast and their easy chemistry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Season two of The OA is both overstuffed and undercooked, a victim of its own commitment to expanding its universe in multifarious ways. Yet the performances are so solid, the commitment to its kooky worldview so earnest, and the smorgasbord of sci-fi curlicues so endearing, sacrificing your expectations of plausibility feels like a worthwhile price of admission to this odd little dimension of the TV universe.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    DC Universe has debuted Doom Patrol, and the show is absurdly watchable. Bananas, yes, but enjoyably bananas.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 42 Alex McLevy
    Weird City tries to go for gonzo, and ends up facedown in the mutant-worm-aerated dirt. ... If we’re supposed to take it at face value, it’s boring; if we’re meant to laugh at it, it’s repellent.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Graham’s script captures the nuances of Britain’s roiling identity crisis with deft insight, and the whole thing is packaged in such an enjoyably crowd-pleasing way that its flaws linger without dragging the proceedings down. It’s reductive and ham-fisted in its direction, sure, but still makes for a breezily engaging tale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    Fyre Fraud, despite its efforts to go after the larger picture, ends up being a frothier and more light-hearted affair, replete with stock photo and cartoon cutaways overlaid with jaunty music cues, overemphasizing the absurdity Fyre has the confidence to know is hardwired into its narrative. [But it is] a helpful reminder that, like so many stories, one account can’t contain the whole truth.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Alex McLevy
    Despite a promising new antagonist in the form of Josh Stewart’s mysterious religious zealot (and his handlers, a pair of wealthy alt-right Bible thumpers who operate like a fusion of the Koch brothers and Franklin Graham), the new plot is continually overshadowed by Russo and his demons.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    Marvel’s Runaways finds a stronger through-line in its sophomore year, but it needs to better balance the endless brooding with levity.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Alex McLevy
    There’s a sense all of this has been done before, and showrunner Jeff Buhler doesn’t quite know how to make it feel new again. It’s a testament to the pulpy dramatics of the source material that Nightflyers remains enjoyable to watch despite these weaknesses.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    The Dream Door is straightforward enough for a change, but that’s not the show’s strong suit; getting strange, scary, and logically unjustifiable are where it soars--just like a nightmare.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    The Purge has an admirable commitment to old-fashioned storytelling, establishing some relatable characters and then simply setting them loose in an exciting, larger-than-life scenario.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Alex McLevy
    While the characters are mostly appealing and the breezy-but-busy tone keeps things moving, it’s anyone’s guess as to whether a feature-length film targeting a younger demographic will manage to sustain the interest of older fans looking for a story engaging enough to roll with the periodically reductive narrative and characterization.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Alex McLevy
    Simonds manages to craft a fresh and unusual story with which to fill in the parameters of the series’ framework.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 42 Alex McLevy
    The best that can be said for The Proposal is that it is so bizarre at times that it becomes a satire of itself, an unintentional comedy of Dada-esque proportions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Alex McLevy
    It’s a rocky start, but once the series leans into its more formally audacious structures and brings its two leads together, Cloak & Dagger finds its identity and gives viewers a reason to invest.

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