Alex Saveliev

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For 237 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 11% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alex Saveliev's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Waves
Lowest review score: 20 Purge of Kingdoms: The Unauthorized Game of Thrones Parody
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 237
237 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    With Settlers, Rockefeller and his crew have created a striking little treatise on our misguided ambitions.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    We may not learn about Casanova the gambler or the spy, but we get to see a vulnerable side previously unexposed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    Although Soderbergh complicates his cinematic dish with too many flavors, No Sudden Move still offers plenty of bites to savor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    Hadaway indicts this country’s misguided preoccupation with being first, scrutinizing America’s twisted values via the prism of her uber-competitive protagonist. As a result, The Novice officially claims the title of The Best Film About Rowing Ever Made.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    It may not be a perfect confection, but this cake’s got layers.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    While it may raise more questions than answers and not quite cohere as a whole, the film nevertheless is poetic and at times breathtakingly beautiful, anchored by a superb cast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Alex Saveliev
    Uproarious. Disturbing. Melancholic. Shrewd. All adjectives that the marketing teams behind Andrew Gaynord’s terrific dark comedy All My Friends Hate Me are welcome to use for promotional purposes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    Under the guise of a straightforward love story, Sethi’s film reveals itself to be an incisive look into the long-running Indian tradition of arranged marriages and its implications, set against the backdrop of a rapidly spreading COVID-19. If that sounds heavy, it’s anything but, the writer-director ensuring that things don’t get bogged down in ponderous polemic or pretentiousness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Alex Saveliev
    Don’t come looking for scares either: possessed narcissistic actors choking themselves over and over isn’t all that frightening. The script, by Luke Baines and Nick Simon, just can’t find any new, intriguing ground to cover. As a comedy, however, the feature is infinitely more effective.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Alex Saveliev
    With unparalleled verisimilitude, Hirori captures both the helplessness and the resolve it takes to see past it, to hold on to a glimmer of hope, faint as it may be. Sabaya will leave you scarred, its images scorched forever into your mind.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Alex Saveliev
    An eccentric local priest spouts nonsense, blood gushes out of the shower, bodies twist and contort at impossible angles, and creatures from hell crawl towards the camera. By the time the convoluted, shrieky finale arrives, it all blends together into nothing more than dull background noise. Your investment in the story will be indirectly proportional to its running time.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    We’ve seen it all before: the obsessive cop with emotional baggage, the small-town folk being interrogated, the lovey-dovey subplot, the tonal dreariness. The filmmaker isn’t aiming to avoid tropes, and what the film does, it does splendidly, though an injection of humor would have certainly been welcome.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    Into the Darkness serves as a keen portrait of a deeply divided country, unsure of where its allegiance lies. Heavy-handed and slow-moving at times, further bogged down by extended speeches about the future of Denmark’s economy/industry, this behemoth nevertheless impresses, simply due to the sophistication of it all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    Few seasoned filmmakers can boast the lightness of touch, the comedic timing, and proficiency with an ensemble cast that the 21-year-old Lindon so nonchalantly possesses. The film would’ve been a treat if it were made by an established auteur; the fact that a complete newcomer concocted the entire thing makes it even more impressive.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    Whether you’ll have a blast with this beat has nothing to do with your affinity for metal music and everything to do with your tolerance for “heart-on-the-sleeve” independent filmmaking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    Akin to a bus that provides temporary shelter from the cold, Drunk Bus is cozy and familiar, but 100 minutes proves to be just enough. I was ready to pull the cord towards the end of this fun, somewhat bumpy ride.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Alex Saveliev
    Beautiful and atmospheric but essentially empty and pointless, Berlin Alexanderplatz hits you with the bluntness of a sledgehammer.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Alex Saveliev
    It's jaw-dropping how slapdash Sheridan's approach is to what's supposed to be the heart and soul of the story – the bonding between Hannah and Connor. The characters are so cardboard, it's a wonder they don't catch fire.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    When the film isn’t deafening you with the sounds of bullets and screams, it revels in silence, in birdsong, in the buzzing of flies, in the tranquil sounds of nature. These sequences are captured beautifully by cinematographer Andrew Commis, Arnhem Land’s emerald ponds and breathtaking vistas forming a stark contrast to the bloodshed and fire and chaos.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    Papers Spiders is everything you want out of a teen drama, more Lady Bird than The Fault in Our Stars. That’s not to say fans of the latter won’t respond to Shampanier’s genuine gem. Don’t let this one slip under the radar.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    Rather unexpectedly, the result is gripping and immersive, bolstered by a committed cast and some remarkable visuals.
    • 7 Metascore
    • 30 Alex Saveliev
    Perhaps the worst thing about the writer/director/star’s feature is that it basks in the excess it purports to condemn, confident that pounding the viewer into submission is the way to go, in addition to ending on a hypocritical note that defies everything that’s occurred up to that point.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Alex Saveliev
    While admirable in its ambition, the end result just doesn’t quite gel. Cool poster, though.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Alex Saveliev
    Like its central performance, Hope manages to convey and dissect so much with (seemingly) so little: the way real struggle makes us realize how much we love, truly see, and trust each other; the hidden reserves of human perseverance in the face of certain death; the healing power of art; and hope, of course. Hope and despair give life meaning, one unable to exist without the other.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Alex Saveliev
    If you happen to be in the mindset for a long, leisurely, spiritual cinematic rumination about the fragility of life, the futility of our professional pursuits, the power of femininity, and the sheer bliss of living in the moment, then delve right in. The writer and director’s aim is not to shock or devastate, nor elicit any strong reaction, but to make one ponder the Meaning of It All.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Alex Saveliev
    For a sci-fi feature, it’s certainly not visually-stimulating; perhaps it would’ve worked better as an audio-book.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    Klein’s decision to pull a Kramer vs. Kramer and provide his heroine with next-to-no discernible rationale for bailing on her family both pays off and becomes a minor hindrance.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    While his previous drama, The Road to Mandalay, showcased his keen eye for social realism, Nina Wu is suffused with visual poetry – all stark-reds and grainy yellows – and a dream-like (or nightmarish, depending on how you view it) atmosphere. It’s a portrait of a country experiencing significant sociopolitical changes. By focusing on its filmmaking industry, Z takes advantage of the opportunity to experiment visually, thematically, and narratively – at times, to the film’s detriment.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 80 Alex Saveliev
    Perhaps the fact that the film is so inspired has something to do with the established camaraderie between fellow Marvel veterans. The franchise’s influence – the ebb and flow of the film, the swooping camera shots, the scope – is evident; only in this case, instead of the System’s victim becoming a superhero, a potential hero falls victim to the System. In the Russo brother’s capable hands, Cherry will speak to both millennials and older generations alike.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Alex Saveliev
    It feels timely and urgent, and its phenomenal young heroine ensures it doesn’t become overly mawkish, preachy, or prosaic.

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