Alison Willmore

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For 138 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alison Willmore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Little Women
Lowest review score: 10 Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 71 out of 138
  2. Negative: 15 out of 138
138 movie reviews
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Alison Willmore
    Thunder Force doesn’t work as a comedy, but that’s because it doesn’t really work as a movie. There’s so little chemistry between McCarthy and Spencer, longtime real-life friends, that, rather than buddies, their characters often just come across as mildly surprised to find themselves in the same room.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Alison Willmore
    Voyagers, in keeping its focus where it does, feels like a waste not just because of how predictable its beats are, but because it ends just when it feels like it’s getting interesting.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Alison Willmore
    Watching the movie summons the distinct sensation of arriving at a party just as the guests are starting to leave.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    Naishuller doesn’t bring the elegant coherence that Leitch and Stahelski do to their fight sequences or manage the same touch of absurdity to lighten up the brutal excesses. What he does have is Bob Odenkirk, and watching Odenkirk join the middle-aged action hero fold is pleasurable enough to make Nobody worth the while, even if it’s an obvious echo of other, better recent films.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    The Human Voice is all about the muddied lines between the fabricated and the genuine, and about how much a performance can be divorced from the sincere feelings that might be undergirding it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Alison Willmore
    There is a maddeningly unconsidered quality to Boogie’s emotions about Asian American masculinity, and never more so than in the film’s fraught relationship with Blackness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Raya and the Last Dragon is a reminder of the things that Disney has always been capable of doing so well at its heights, a marvel of character design, world-building, and canny choices. It unfurls a richly realized Southeast Asia–inspired fantasy realm called Kumandra, made up of craggy deserts, snowy bamboo forests, floating markets, and canal-shielded cities.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Alison Willmore
    Masterful and agonizing, The Father is a gorgeously crafted film about a doomed arrangement entered into with love, even though it can only end in tragedy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    Supernova isn’t adapted from a play, but it sometimes feels like it was, not because of its talkiness or the tightness of its focus, but because it has a tendency to be a little blunter in practice than its understated initial tone might have you expect. The performances are lovely, though, and they carry this minor-key movie through to its ambiguous end.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Chung is a patient filmmaker who works in small sequences that accrue imperceptibly into something grander.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    It’s whimsical and bold and also easier to admire in the abstract than to get deeply emotionally invested in, though it features a late-breaking burst of beauty that will soften the hardest of hearts.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Alison Willmore
    Wild Mountain Thyme is not just charmless. It is genuinely confounding, a movie constantly working against itself to make its characters and their dilemma comprehensible.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    The delight of the exuberantly bittersweet closing sequence comes from the way it fulfills a promise the audience doesn’t realize, until that point, has been made.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    Run
    Whenever Paulson is on screen, she gives Run a much-needed jolt of vitality as this Munchausen’s-by-proxy monster in catalog knitwear. Her character’s devotion is as terrible as it is unshakeable, but what makes the turn so enjoyable is that it’s grounded in something recognizable — a soul-deep dread of being abandoned, hidden under a nurturer’s smile.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Freaky, an unabashedly gory but also oddly sweet feature from Christopher Landon, is a riff on slashers that really owes more to the meta-horror trend than it does to any of the original films that inspired it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Alison Willmore
    They’re progressive, positive young women, and they’re tragically boring, which is less the fault of their woke makeover than the film’s conviction that it’s incompatible with conflict or distinct personalities.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Alison Willmore
    It’s an adaptation without direction or purpose, with an unwieldy but deeply committed performance at its center. Hathaway looks to be having fun, at least. Someone should!
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    Time is an extraordinary documentary from director and artist Garrett Bradley, who didn’t make a film about Rich and her family so much as make one with them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Shot in black-and-white with occasional accents of color, and given to camera-facing testimonials from characters around Radha’s neighborhood in a nod to Spike Lee, The 40-Year-Old Version feels like a ’90s indie throwback, loose and left raw at the edges, marked by an intimacy that can only come from drawing from the stuff of its multi-hyphenate creator’s life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    If Possessor ultimately feels more like a testament to its director’s excellent taste in influences than a film that entirely gels in itself, it’s still a thoroughly troubling watch.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    On the Rocks isn’t a great movie, but it’s one overflowing with feelings that it tries to squash into something tidier.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    This film is one of those exhilarating instances when Sorkin finds a context in which all of his well-established impulses that can be so annoying elsewhere — the self-righteousness, the straw men, the great men, the men who aren’t onstage but are nevertheless digging deep in their diaphragms to deliver their lines to the back row — actually work.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    Ammonite is Winslet’s movie to shoulder, and she carries it as far as she can.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    As a statement on a decade of consumerism, The Nest doesn’t have anything particularly new to say, but as a fable of familial dysfunction, it’s resonant and, yes, frightening, with nary a ghost in sight.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Alison Willmore
    Through these characters, Zhao is able to examine the idea of wide-open frontiers without nostalgia or the need to pathologize the parts of our social structures that are eroding or have failed. Those shots of Fern, a tiny, determined dot out there on a stunning panorama, are breathtaking and elegiac. She is a woman eking out the life she wants to lead, a woman who has gone to look for America.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Alison Willmore
    Mulan is a dour drag as a work of art and entertainment, an empty if occasionally impressive-looking spectacle propped up by some incredibly clunky writing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    In its constant asterisking of its own material, I’m Thinking of Ending Things feels like an artistic dead end, like the confession of someone who can only burrow deeper and deeper into himself instead of looking outward.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    The most successful quality of the film is how close it keeps in spirit and haphazard style to the first two installments, and how it feels proudly unstuck in time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    There’s a resilient buoyancy running through The Personal History of David Copperfield that proves irresistibly moving by the end of its journey. Its protagonist weathers hardships and cruelties in addition to benefiting from acts of kindness, and yet he never loses his capacity to be fascinated by people, a quality that’s comforting without feeling cloying.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Alison Willmore
    For a movie marking a week in which theaters are reopening, Unhinged feels a lot like a movie that would be best caught on cable someday.

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