Alison Willmore

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For 139 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alison Willmore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Little Women
Lowest review score: 10 Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 72 out of 139
  2. Negative: 15 out of 139
139 movie reviews
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Alison Willmore
    For a movie marking a week in which theaters are reopening, Unhinged feels a lot like a movie that would be best caught on cable someday.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Alison Willmore
    The trouble with trying to push at the boundaries of the superhero genre isn’t that we’re out of material, it’s that imaginations are so limited that a film that starts with a twist on a familiar premise nevertheless loops around to a standard showdown involving an incoherent blur of computer generated effects.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    McBaine and Moss are the team behind 2014’s The Overnighters, a wrenching film about the North Dakota oil boom, and they’re interested in something beyond the contrast of adolescent faces and grown-up topics — or, for that matter, serving up simple optimism about Gen Z when taking in these young men at the cusps of their political lives.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    As a thriller, The Burnt Orange Heresy is entirely underwhelming, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t worth watching.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    When it works, which it does most of all in its opening and closing acts, it’s because it manages to give a surprising emotional solidity to what’s otherwise a whimsical premise.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    As a film, it’s warm and beautiful without being sentimental about the temporary intimacy that alcohol can provide, creating bonds that can dissolve in the daylightlike haze but are no less legitimate in the moment for it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Palm Springs would have been a scream and likely a word-of-mouth hit in theaters, but maybe there’s something fitting about its going straight to streaming in the middle of a pandemic. What is quarantine, anyway, if not waking up and going through the same routine over and over without end?
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 Alison Willmore
    Irresistible isn’t just shockingly ineffectual in its insights into national schisms — it is, in an added betrayal, unfunny, requiring its audience to slog their way through so much laborious farce without a laugh in sight.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    If there’s a complaint to be made about it, it’s only that it feels like another sign of a stylistic trend that’s inexorably cohering, as seen in other recent (and enjoyable!) work like Emerald Fennell’s "Promising Young Woman" and like "Killing Eve," a show Fennell wrote for and that Murphy has directed episodes of.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 10 Alison Willmore
    The movie is so charmless and hopelessly incoherent that you might feel the need to consult Wikipedia afterward for some help on what it was even about.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Alison Willmore
    The King of Staten Island shrinks Davidson down a little too much, to the point where his pathos and humor doesn’t blend with but actively gets obscured by his immaturity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    An interestingly woozy new film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    It’s an homage to radio dramas, maybe, but also works as a reminder that while film is a visual medium, sometimes sound can be enough to sustain you. It’s a sound, after all, that opens up the cloistered world that Everett and Fay are living in, exposing them to something terrible and awe-inspiring and new.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    A deliciously absorbing documentary.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Alison Willmore
    The best part of Scoob!, a computer-animated reboot of the Scooby-Doo franchise, is the part in which the movie painstakingly recreates the opening credits of the original series.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Alison Willmore
    The problem with Capone isn’t that it’s an unconventional biography or a challenge to the image of a famous figure. It’s that it’s not bold enough on either of those fronts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Jackman gives his best dramatic performance since he played the obsessive, hollow Robert Angier in "The Prestige."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    They’re stories you can find in the book, accompanied by ones from a multitude of other contributors, including Schellenbach, who gets to give her own account of what happened. So why not just read that?
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    Selah and the Spades ends just as it feels like it’s really picking up momentum, which is the major frustration of the film and also, likely, part of the reason it was picked up by Amazon both as a release and the basis for a possible series adaptation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    While "The Invisible Man" was built around its clever set pieces rather than its characters, Swallow is led by its protagonist’s mental and emotional state. It takes place in a landscape that’s largely internal — but that’s territory that can be just as filled with darkness and dread as a forbidding mansion.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Alison Willmore
    The Hunt isn’t a total mishap, not with Gilpin being as good as she is and with Zobel’s gleeful aptitude for violence, but that’s what’s so exasperating about it. It has a habit of getting in its own way with trollish tendencies whenever it starts to build momentum.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    It’s a performance that suggests the most interesting stretch of Affleck’s career as an actor is still to come.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Alison Willmore
    The Invisible Man is not as smart as it could have been, but the concept is ingenious even if the execution gets slapdash. And with Moss at the center, it doesn’t matter all that much — she sells what’s approached as B-movie material with the unwavering dedication of someone starring in a prestige biopic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    At its best, it’s effervescent. Leads Taylor-Joy (an inevitable future star) and Flynn (perfectly sad-eyed) are lovable and surrounded by some very funny supporting performances from Mia Goth as Emma’s friend and underling, Harriet, Miranda Hart as the garrulous Miss Bates, and Bill Nighy as Emma’s adoring dad.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 10 Alison Willmore
    It is a terrible horror movie, by the way, just wretchedly unenjoyable.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Alison Willmore
    Chemistry is nothing to sniff at, but P.S. I Still Love You does come awfully close to arguing itself out of its central romance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Alison Willmore
    If the results are mixed, it’s because the movie devotes more thought to putting distance between itself and Suicide Squad than to imagining what an independent version of the character is actually like.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    Fennell’s film is a vibrant, stylistically precise piece of work, but the sentiments it conveys don’t feel examined. It’s an acceleration off a cliff when what you’d really like to see is some kind of road forward, no matter how rough.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Never Rarely Sometimes Always isn’t agitprop for an era of increasingly restricted abortion access, though it’d be entirely justified and effective in being so. It is, simply, a depiction of a reality of our present, and the fact that it often feels like a thriller is a damning reflection of how much peril those restrictions have created, especially for the already vulnerable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    What makes the film such a spare but searingly insightful treatment of the issues at the core of Me Too is the way it refuses to separate its unseen executive’s sexual predation from the larger structures that enable it.

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