Allison Keene

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For 311 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Allison Keene's Scores

Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Planet Earth: Blue Planet II
Lowest review score: 10 Buckwild: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 311
311 tv reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    When Maniac is good, it’s funny, affecting, and fascinating; when it’s not good, it’s like having a conversation with a student in a Psych 101 class who wants to tell you about a dream they had last night and what it might mean. It leaves the series as a rambling journey that some will find charming and others frustrating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    There are a few really interesting storylines broached casually in the series that would have benefitted from more episodes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    If you liked the first season of Iron Fist, Season 2 improves upon it. If you didn’t like it, well, there’s not much to recommend to you regarding a return. It’s a show that seems like it might be improved by not bingeing it, but it’s so sleepy that once you walk away from it you may forget to return.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    Even as it has softened visually just a little, (though it’s dialogue is a crackling as ever), the show has certainly not lost its edge.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    The long-awaited spinoff feels in many ways like the later seasons of Sons of Anarchy, where heavy plotting peppered with gruesome violence overtook the character connections that had made the story so strong to begin with.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    There are an array of interesting stories happening in Disenchantment, none of which the show gives quite enough time to.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    Occasionally it’s a little too jumpy, but Ordeal by Innocence is saved, again, by gorgeous costuming and set design, with the colors coordinated in ways that make every frame an artistic expression.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    Lodge 49 is funny, occasionally dark, and very unique, but beyond that, it’s hard to define. Whatever it is, it’s certainly different. And worth the journey.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    The new season of Better Call Saul starts off slowly and somberly (as of its first three episode available for review), full of silence and tension. Jimmy, Mike, and Nacho are all dealing with the fallout from decisions they’ve made to do what they thought was right--even if what they did to get there is more morally muddled.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    It may not be reinventing the wheel here, but it doesn’t need to. It’s a simple structure with a twisted story, and it’s good.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    For viewers--especially those who know what it feels like to have a complicated relationship with your hometown--it’s an acutely intense experience.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    Davies’ script is light and witty, and Frears doubles down on jokes by often both showing and telling, to fantastic effect. ... Thorpe is thoughtful and careful, with Hugh Grant as inscrutably charming as ever.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Allison Keene
    GLOW is joyous, delightful, smart and funny television that showcases the complicated dance of strength and vulnerability in women, from Junkchains and She Wolves to Vikings and Liberty Belles.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Allison Keene
    Even for casual viewers, the episodic jokes and the sheer earnestness that radiates from Sam and Tim should be enough of a hook. In a sea of dark TV, Detroiters is the light-hearted, smart comedy with a wonderfully sincere core that we need.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    For every horse galloping across the plains, there’s a rattlesnake attack, or for each successfully delivered calf there’s a tractor accident. The balance that Sheridan finds here can be a good thing, but it can also be emotionally exhausting. There’s no clear direction, or much hope for how things might turn out for our key players.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    There are plenty of things this season does well, really well, but there is so much filler and narrative dragging of feet in between that it’s hard to recommend it outright.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    The series never feels fully comfortable being either teen-oriented or more adult. It never really seems comfortable anywhere, really, as it skims through its scenes without investigating its surroundings, including the feelings or motivations of its characters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    Dietland’s scattershot approach to plotting and its desire to be a quirky, dark comedy rather than lean in to its more sincere moments (and the treasure that it have in Nash) leave it as a missed opportunity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    A surprisingly entertaining spinoff series that marries old formulas with new twists.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    The joy of seeing them all plot against one another and lay traps and sometimes fall into them themselves often rivals the best machinations of Lannisters, Targaryens, or a Littlefinger. Most of the characters in Succession suffer from a litany of faults: arrogance, greed, ignorance, cowardice, selfishness, delusions of grandeur, but the show has a potent combination of virtues that makes up for these sins.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    It’s gorgeous and often visually stunning, but emotionally hollow. There’s no feeling of connection to the girls, or a reason to like them.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    The caliber of the cast and Jessica Hobbs’ lush and active direction elevate The Split from being a little too soapy and predictable when it comes to the drama of the DeFoe’s personal lives. Each member of the cast brings an emotional honesty to their performance, particularly Walker.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Allison Keene
    While the family is usually better together, they’re mostly scattered again (with a few strange pairings that don’t really work, like Lucille and Tobias), and the narrative focus is completely on Michael. No one else has much of an individual story yet, and that’s a shame, because the strongest comedy so far comes from the plots that are the most removed from Michael.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Allison Keene
    Every vignette of upperclass life that revolves around Patrick’s journey is just as worthy of exploration as his own, and as the series delightfully (and sometimes devastatingly) dips in and out of their lives, it’s a privilege to be on the ride.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    In many ways this first season feels like one long first act in a much bigger story about learning to define and embrace your identity. ... Still, thanks to Vida’s strong cast, no matter where things go, it makes us want to follow.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Allison Keene
    While the setup for Sweetbitter is pretty rote, especially in the first episode, the series quickly picks up steam as it turns more into an odyssey of New York life for a young adult.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 20 Allison Keene
    The series misses so many opportunities by shying away from anything that might lead to more dynamic storytelling or truly illuminating the lives of its subjects. It’s a show about an artist without rules, yet it limits itself by playing it safe.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    Once again, the series’ relevance is clear as a cautionary tale, but some of the scripting can be ham-fisted in that regard. But whatever issues Handmaid’s has with narrative nuance, though, is more than made up for by exceptional work by its cast.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Allison Keene
    Westworld is playing with a myriad of timelines again, with some mystery attached to them. But the personal reveals within them are far more satisfying, with particularly great work done by Peter Mullan as William/The Man in Black’s father-in-law James Delos, and from Wright as an ailing but crucially awakened Bernard.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Allison Keene
    Killing Eve is a spy story, a murder mystery, a spellbinding character drama, and a gloriously wicked comedy. It all comes together to make one of the year’s most delightful and captivating series that will hopefully play on for many seasons to come (Serendipitously, the series was renewed for Season 2 just before this review published).

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