Amy Nicholson

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For 395 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Amy Nicholson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Second Mother
Lowest review score: 0 3 Geezers!
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 43 out of 395
395 movie reviews
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Murder Mystery feels as shamelessly gaudy as paste jewelry — a trinket for nights that aspire to nothing more exotic than a pizza — but Aniston sparkles like the real deal.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    He left behind enough tape from both ends of the microphone that Belkin is able to create his entire documentary with old footage, juiced by retro imagery of broadcast air waves and vintage dials and knobs.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    Every line of dialogue in Trial by Fire is wrapped with so much exposition that the film feels tied to the train-tracks of good taste. Characters don’t converse, they simply say all their thoughts aloud.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Sure, Sagan’s scientific method dominates the universe. But here on earth, this crowd-pleaser convinces us to spend one day savoring an American Dream.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    What it means, Alcazar leaves open for interpretation. He’s more a mood maker than a story teller, and the film feels like people watching at a fancy party and inhaling different wafts of perfume.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    The Satanic Temple’s combination of shock tactics and anti-discrimination lawsuits is check-and-mate against America creeping towards a Christian theocracy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The irony at the core of the Dr. Ruth persona is that the maverick who made the bedroom public is herself incredibly private, and while she encourages women to get intimate with their bodies, she’s not in touch with her own emotions. Still, she is vocal about respecting boundaries, and White acquiesces, trusting that the facts of Westheimer’s life say plenty about her peppy workaholism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    This cheerful small town portrait makes for an idealistic crowd-pleaser (after all, Eureka Springs is the rumored home of healing waters), but this beautiful, and beautifully shot, documentary is a cure for the angry headline blues.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Mostly I Am Mother is exactly what it seems: a good-looking allegory that postures like it’s wrestling with more ideas than it actually is.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    “Corporate Animals” is a character sketch in search of a plot.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The paradox of "Little Monsters" is that it’s so guileless in its story and execution, it could have been made for kids, except for the disembowelings. Still, Nyong’o not only survives the film with her dignity intact, the audience might exit admiring her more.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Anvari has set out to make a mood piece that succeeds in scaring the audience senseless.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    In the last act, Poulton and Savage’s long fuse explodes, and they get to prove they’ve made a hell of a picture.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The crux of Gun’s struggle is that she risked everything to tell the truth, and the war happened anyway. Ultimately, her personal story was neither uplifting, nor tragic, which means the film surrounding her doesn’t hurtle toward a satisfying arc.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    Knock Down the House has a clear political agenda. It wants to promote the hard work, courage and progressive policies of these women, who have all experienced financial hardship. Still, the film lets its subjects do the talking instead of cluttering things with statistics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Writer-director Baig has made a coming-of-age charmer that’s adamantly ordinary. Her script has the melody of John Hughes and early Amy Heckerling played with a few minor chords.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    If Woodard is hoping for her overdue second Oscar nomination after 1983’s “Cross Creek,” she’s got a decent shot with this excruciating character arc. Yet, the actress is even better in the scenes where Bernadine simply gets drunk, even if she still can’t talk about anything but work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    It’s a terrific showcase for the duo and their entire cast, which, besides a pop-up bit from Clement, is curated from a local talent pool that Hollywood has yet to spelunk. After this, it should.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    The Cleaners has the effect of scanning three dozen grim tweets. There’s not much to latch onto besides an overwhelming sense of helplessness; like the internet itself, it’s crowded with opinions but lacking in intimacy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Åkerlund’s music videos established him as a whiz-bang technician, a skill he only unleashes in two terrifying montages. Lords of Chaos proves that he can also get great performances out of a young cast, especially Kilmer’s otherworldly Dead.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    306 Hollywood is best when it gets either very scientifically dry, or reaches beyond its liminal cuteness into ambitious visual poetry.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Even at its most suspenseful, when Jed Kurzel’s cello score stabs at the eardrums, Overlord feels familiar, a collage of cinematic nightmares checking off its influences.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    The film feels a lot like the Serge Gainsbourg number that Stephanie dances to in the kitchen: jazzy, a little sleazy, and worth a cult following.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Sierra Burgess is a Loser is a slumber-party charmer that wants to satisfy every craving, even when what audiences are hungry for clashes, like pouring a chocolate milkshake over a pepperoni pizza.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    None of the sizzle is as compelling as this character study of a young woman who confesses that her only childhood companion was the TV.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Destination Wedding barely holds together as a coherent film. It’s too callous for coos, too chipper to examine the dark corners of the soul. Yet it works as a valentine to old-fashioned star power — two modern legends, older if no wiser, daring the audience to somehow love them for all their faults, and on that level, somehow succeeding.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    As a debut film, Arizona shows that Watson could become a director with interesting ideas, but this housing crisis horror comedy is definitely just a rental.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Its refractory tone, both deadpan and swoony, announces that the first-time feature directors have a phenomenal eye for character (which is something those who’ve been watching Marks’ work as an actress may already have realized).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    With the right script, this trio could make a fantastic flick. Forget these “spectacular” men. These flawed women are plenty.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Tag
    Surprisingly, there’s emotional resonance in this slapstick flick about friends who are terrified to hug. Add that to the solid chemistry between the leads, and Tag is a fine callback to the sprawling ensemble comedies of the 1980s, back when the real-life tag team graduated high school. It’s a solid summer film that will melt away from memory by fall.

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