Amy Nicholson

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For 496 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Amy Nicholson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Vast of Night
Lowest review score: 0 3 Geezers!
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 496
496 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The high-aggro guitar score is a misstep, but a panting, battered King is credible and compelling as she kicks, stabs and screams for the right to choose her own destiny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    A tepid Regency-era romance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    One wonders if this generation’s more attuned and sensitive kids will find this staging of “Trevor” quaint, kitschy — or perhaps still universal.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Too soon, however, this intriguing psychological study turns into a programmatic geeks-vs-bullies story that relies on pushing the easiest emotional buttons.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    This remake is loud and exaggerated; it’s more hijinks than heart. (Even the swans that bedeviled Martin have been swapped out for synchronized flamingos.) Audiences looking to shed a tear need not RSVP.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The film is besotted by its own cleverness. The overwrought dialogue clashes with the rest of the movie’s naturalism. But Smyth’s very point is that ordinary folk have the right to strive for poetry — and his shaggy sincerity wins out in the end. With this promising ditty as his debut feature, the filmmaker introduces himself as a voice to be heard.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    There’s a vicarious pleasure to be found in watching Hopkins, the octogenarian actor, getting the hang of technology that allows him to film himself without the usual hovering crew.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Nothing in here makes an argument to be on the big screen. But it’s darned delightful, like a fizzy soda on a hot day.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Fellowes manages to navigate Downton Abbey to charm both reactionaries and revolutionaries.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    This frenetic and funny crossbreeding of live action and cartoon is both a reboot and an anti-reboot, a corporate-funded raspberry at corporate IP, and a giddily dumb smart aleck committed to mocking its joke — and making it, too.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    The film’s early snark turns as cloying and insincere as the cultural doublespeak that it parodies. By the final act, its dialogue is so burdened by inspirational maxims about personal authenticity that it feels as though the script has been hijacked by yearbook quotes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    The tone is too rigidly intellectual for the movie to succeed as a tense thriller. But the actors are up to the challenge of not so much sharing scenes as coexisting within them, particularly Timoteo as the embittered wife who roils like a teakettle that has been welded shut.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    It is clear from the offset which sibling will win both Paige’s affection and the obligatory climactic smooch. The journey there can drag. More fresh is the movie’s sex-positive empathy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    It is a pity that Richard Bean and Clive Coleman’s script mires Bunton in a soggy family drama about an unresolved death; an elder son (Jack Bandeira) who flirts with crime; and a wife, Dorothy (Helen Mirren, so sheepish as to be near invisible), who is humiliated that her husband prefers prison to a stable home.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    This is the most absorbing and well-paced film in the trilogy to date, despite its nearly two-and-a-half-hour running time — de rigueur for modern spectacles that want to convince audiences they’re getting enough bang for their buck. “Secrets of Dumbledore” gestures toward themes of frailty, thwarted intentions and forgiveness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is a fast-paced romp that’s silly, filled with quips and unabashedly for children — which is refreshing, coming at a time when so many other children’s franchises have succumbed to Sturm und Drang.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The movie’s passion is incredible — but, boy, is it embodied in something awkward.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    [Tim Federle's] leads deliver hearty performances that elevate the movie, particularly once we’ve had time to adjust to the gusto of Wood, whose wired performance has the flavor of Hugh Jackman’s exuberance squeezed into an espresso cup.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    While the romantic comedy is hobbled by the lack of onscreen chemistry between the stars, it’s never in doubt that both actors are giving these exertions their all—each excels individually, but they just can’t kiss like they mean it. Instead, their rapport is that of professional colleagues who complement each other’s work, and Ms. Bullock allows Mr. Tatum to showcase his brilliance at playing dumb.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    Despite their wundercabinet of delights, the filmmakers most want to celebrate human beings in all their contradictions. Each of us, the movie says, is capable of everything.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    It is the film’s shaggier pleasures that leave an impression, particularly its soundtrack of ’80s electro disco and a physically shaggy ice-cream parlor manager (played by Stanley Simons) who is too stoned to notice that his new employee is two different people.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Deep Water is a wickedly funny potboiler about sex, gossip and hypocrisy that Mr. Lyne has transplanted from the suburban Northeast to New Orleans, a city that sweats menace despite the film’s chilly blue cinematography and coldly erotic score.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    The story’s pleasures are more literary than cinematic. On screen, it’s more obvious that Mr. Moore’s ideas don’t quite line up.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Amy Nicholson
    It’s mostly a lot of manic editing and caffeinated camerawork, each trying and failing to juice some excitement out of Hauser’s dull performance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Amy Nicholson
    The movie’s mood is unrelentingly miserable. Its cinematography, by Ross Giardina, is bleached-bone bright; its soundscape features more buzzing flies than music.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Amy Nicholson
    A wickedly funny cannibal romance and dazzling feature debut from the director Mimi Cave.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Amy Nicholson
    The script has plot twists so cuckoo they make soap operas look cowardly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    This is a movie about letting the mind roam.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Amy Nicholson
    The plot is scattershot; the drama ant-size.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    At least Williams displays a bit of inventive flair with novel booby traps and a chase scene that features a lurching garbage truck.

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