Amy Nicholson

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For 438 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Amy Nicholson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Barry
Lowest review score: 0 3 Geezers!
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 45 out of 438
438 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    It’s as uplifting and threadbare as a feel-good viral video stretched to feature length, yet Makijany’s ability to rally the troops, get solid performances from first-time actors, and simply get the film made is worth a genuine cheer.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Long before the motley crew crashes the Met Gala, it’s clear that director Ryan Crego is bolting wacky gee-gaws onto a rote plot. Still, several gags pay off.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Amy Nicholson
    This is a film as tidy, transparent and kid-friendly as a square of Jell-O salad, and so squishily eager-to-please that it doesn’t engage with its religious themes so much as tuck them into song lyrics to hover in the narrative like grapes.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The result is sniggering slapstick that’s two-parts biological fluids and one-part salute to the innate empathy of mankind, often in the same scene.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    The gripping documentary Operation Varsity Blues: The College Admissions Scandal shifts the spotlight back to Singer, played in re-enactments by Matthew Modine with dialogue taken directly from wiretaps, to understand how a flip flop-clad former basketball coach rebranded himself as an academic glad-hander for the 1 percent.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    The movie is lovely, but airless and bolted with scraps that barely hold together.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    The cumulative assassinations begin to ache like a mysterious bruise, making the audience feel the psychic weight of living in fear. Yet, the style of the film is more teen soap opera than vérité miserablism.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Olson’s poetic b-roll and Will Epstein’s soft, pulsing piano score buff away the lurid shocks.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    While Clouds is as doe-eyed and puppyish as an acoustic serenade, Baldoni is wise to recognize that attention must be paid to Zach’s survivors.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Amy Nicholson
    It’s a mess — and I’m not just talking about the close-up of a bleeding, ghost-gratified fingernail.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Amy Nicholson
    The film wants to prove that hope isn’t fools gold. And when it does, Rocks glows.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    A gut punch with a side of anguish.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    It’s as comforting as a prescription drug commercial, which could send some parents into a conniption. But Unpregnant advocates loudest for allowing young women the space to make their own choices — and that they have friends, longtime or newfound, willing to help when they stumble.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Alberdi’s comic-caper approach soon fizzles. Like Sergio, the film is hunting for drama, something to merit the 007 guitar and upright bass riffs of Vincent van Warmerdam’s score.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    The New Mutants spent three years on ice before being allowed to escape into the slowest summer season in a century. That’s fitting for a film that’s all buildup and no bang.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    [A] cheery, lightweight documentary.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Amy Nicholson
    Though the gags are retrograde groaners, Lapkus embarrasses herself with confidence. Her full-throttle verve transcends the script like a water skier leaping over a Great White.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Amy Nicholson
    Writer-director Tayarisha Poe’s cold and stylish debut, commands attention. More specifically, Simone’s Selah seizes it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Once the major ideas are on the table, the momentum wobbles and The Platform trades thrills for the empathetic weight of imprisonment. There’s more blood and less hope, though Aranzazu Calleja’s music box-inspired score can lighten the mood to that of a storybook fable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Scare Me would work even better onstage. On screen, it feels like an experiment in minimalism. The film is heavy-handed only in Fred’s fear of emasculation and Fanny’s digs at “desperate white dudes,” troweled on for socially relevant heft.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Almereyda lays tracks to take Tesla in a dozen wild directions. . . . Yet, having ordered the audience onboard, Almereyda doesn’t go anywhere with the gambit.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    As a ballad about a rock star’s soul, The Nowhere Inn is a fun riff performed on flimsy strings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    The film’s truly ridiculous plot choices — the phony twists that make you leave the theater feeling like you’ve inhaled a tank of carbon monoxide — are its own invention, bolted onto a likable, if formulaic, charmer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Blast Beat cares far more about testing the limits of the family’s togetherness, and while the resolution doesn’t have the sweetness of a pop song, Arango is happy to settle for heavy metal discordance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Beast Beast’s plot twist is a swing at gravitas that disrupts the balance of Madden’s naturalistic character study. This is the way teen life is, Madden says, until suddenly the film accelerates from reality to sensationalism, and trades humanity for pulp.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Though Feinberg is a singular figure in modern American history (few else could, or would, do his job), Worth hammers his story into a standard biopic template — Grinch Finds Heart — as though one man discovering empathy is truly priceless.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    The doc gives Mercado’s story back to Mercado. Better, it shows that Mercado is still the same spiritualistic, highfalutin’ fashion-plate as a retiree eating breakfast at home as he was on TV. The film’s biggest revelation is that Mercado’s mystical, magnificent, big-hearted shtick was no fraud — he was always the real deal.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Eventually, Jumbo clatters to a stop with a tinny cheer for acceptance, a sugar rush of Belgian new wave music, and the sense that the audience has been taken for a bit of a ride.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    America is so punch-drunk that The Fight often feels like it’s whacking old bruises. But that is the national psyche’s problem more than the filmmakers’. For their part, they have made a worthwhile record of the civil rights advocates combating the country’s backslide into stripping away rights for voters, immigrants, pregnant women and the LGBTQ community.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Amy Nicholson
    Cuties' job is to coil the contrasting messages and spin them until her lead falls down dizzy, which can make the film feel as subtle as a headache.

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