For 277 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Crump's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Palm Trees and Power Lines
Lowest review score: 0 The Last Days of American Crime
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 277
277 movie reviews
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Andrew Crump
    Instead of exercising artistic liberties over the written word, Louhimies goes all-in on putting those words on screen, a task too great even for nearly two hours of runtime; maybe Attack on Finland would work better if fashioned into a miniseries. Even then, though, it wouldn’t work as the entertainment it aspires toward.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 74 Andrew Crump
    Backstory is fine. Seeing King introduce scores of anonymous leering henchmen to their varying deaths is better.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 79 Andrew Crump
    The writer/director demonstrates a rare storytelling economy in his feature debut, leaving no trace of fat on Homebound’s bones and letting only the most essential elements shine.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 69 Andrew Crump
    In her recent roles, like Lamb and the imminent You Will Not Be Alone, Rapace has expressed boundless terror and awe in the pursuit of existential questions about being human. In Black Crab, she reminds us with steely resolve that she’s incredibly capable at performing toughness, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 79 Andrew Crump
    All My Friends Hate Me digs out a special niche between cringe comedy and horror, as if Stourton, Palmer and director Andrew Gaynord welded an EC Comics plot to an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Andrew Crump
    What Maitland does do to separate his film from other docs that rely on that structure is weave dramatization into documentation, breathing life into the woeful stories and dashed dreams of men, women and children mailing their pleas for relief to Michael Brody Jr. at the edge of desperation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Andrew Crump
    The film should read like an epic. Instead, it reads like a boilerplate sports doc; the kind kept on constant rotation in ski resort taverns where they might catch diners’ attention for a minute or two while they wait on chili and beers.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Crump
    Huda’s Salon uses strong thread to sew its dual narratives together, but “together” is all they are. They don’t cohere or complement each other save for providing two distinct paths into Abu-Assad’s exploration of Palestinian identity and life, contextualized in women’s experiences as members of a patriarchal society.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Andrew Crump
    No one can top Hooper or “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” or even match them. Garcia is smart enough not to put on airs. He just lets Leathersaw rip.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Crump
    More studio comedies should take chances on their principal cast members the way I Want You Back does. Even if little else here worked, at least Day and Slate do.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Crump
    Fearsome and fearless at the same time, Palm Trees and Power Lines practically dares viewers to watch what’s happening on screen without flinching.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 82 Andrew Crump
    It’s an odd sort of travelogue Leon and Kirby curate here, but Italian Studies’ drifting, artsy peculiarities make 70 minutes fly by with a palliative affection—for Alina, for New York and for all the intersecting stories contained within its bounds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 37 Andrew Crump
    As mired as it is in identity confusion, cheeseball sentimentality and jaundiced camera filters, The Tender Bar could’ve been something if it had a purpose.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Crump
    Agnes should excite viewers who like their demonic possession films and nun content fresh; there are nuns, and there is demonic possession, but there’s also Reece’s stubborn commitment to picking a niche and sticking with his aesthetic, which can be summed up as “characters kibitzing in dingy spaces.”
    • 53 Metascore
    • 64 Andrew Crump
    To the Erwins’ credit, they make an effort at taking their movie somewhere interesting and, at least for a Jesus-y football picture, new.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 21 Andrew Crump
    It’s possible for cinema to weave this many themes and concerns together into one cohesive film. The Unforgivable simply doesn’t.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 39 Andrew Crump
    There’s a good movie baked into Being the Ricardos’ 131 minutes. It’s about 90 minutes long, maybe a little less. The remaining 41 minutes comprise an Aaron Sorkin movie, and like too much cream in a beautifully fried donut, they weigh down the total package with needless fat: Talking heads, flashbacks and archival footage.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Andrew Crump
    Guided by Fabietto, the movie takes its time. It watches. It breathes. It captures life with a clarity even Sorrentino’s best efforts haven’t quite—which makes it his best effort to date.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Andrew Crump
    There’s much to like about his work here. Just skip the canapes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Andrew Crump
    What Imbert has done here, some years down the line, may solidify The Summit of the Gods, a work of fiction, as one of the greatest Everest films ever made. If nothing else it’s the Everest film that respects the mountain best.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Andrew Crump
    Julia, with all of its intimate, personal and professional accounts of her character and her rise to fame, is an interesting movie: Thoroughly enjoyable, brimming with things to say, constructed in a manner that ducks pretense for relatability.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 73 Andrew Crump
    Army of the Dead is a film full of pleasant surprises, but Matthias Schweighöfer, playing a German safecracker with a hair-trigger for impassioned speeches about locks and bolts, is perhaps the most pleasant surprise of them all.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 86 Andrew Crump
    What is a fishing community if restrictions deny their catch? The world continues to change no matter what anyone does. Camilleri understands that dilemma and puts it on film with humble clarity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Andrew Crump
    Saloum is tense and, when it kicks into high gear, scary as hell.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Crump
    For a movie about government incompetence married to government malfeasance, Costa Brava, Lebanon is surprisingly funny.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 64 Andrew Crump
    Most of Best Sellers’ problems have to do with structure instead of performance, so there’s not much that Plaza and Caine can do. They’re stymied by the writing and constricted by the direction.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Andrew Crump
    Edwin declines to make a choice between idiosyncrasy and action, and his work winds up feeling like a loosely related assembly of material instead of a finished film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Andrew Crump
    Duplass and Morales play their parts with honesty and grace; they write those parts and the drama between them with straightforward understanding of the complications of remote associations, and the total package is then presented straightforwardly. There’s no other way for screenlife to present itself. But the film loses nothing in that straightforwardness, neither authenticity nor humanity nor Morales’ appeal as an actress-turned-multihyphenate.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Andrew Crump
    [Campbell] and Radwanski pair well. Together, they make Anne at 13,000 Ft. into a work that may leave the audience gasping for air.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 72 Andrew Crump
    Wild Indian doesn’t have answers. There aren’t any. Instead, there are experiences, and Corbine Jr. captures his protagonists’ personal transformations with steeled honesty.

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