For 69 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 13.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Lapin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 51
Highest review score: 90 Wadjda
Lowest review score: 10 The Pyramid
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 69
  2. Negative: 12 out of 69
69 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    Burdge, Lafleur, and Palladino are effortlessly believable as sisters, but that only makes it seem like a shame that the script doesn’t take fuller advantage of their innate chemistry.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Lapin
    A prime example of how to deliver a film on an urgent topic that doesn’t feel like medicine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Lapin
    The film’s brevity really does work against it, giving Nicholson cover to fly by the history of gang warfare without having to dwell on anything for too long.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    Revolting plays with interesting ideas about how different generations of activists inspire and feed off of one another, but that theme plays out as blindly congratulatory.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Lapin
    The film’s deft, improbable balance of tone makes its success feel well-deserved. Not many directors could have pulled off the blend of somber reflection and gallows humor that Tal Granit and Sharon Maymon manage here.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    The majority of the cast are non-actors, and act it, judging by their stilted, wooden performances and robotic attempts at simple human interactions. This seems to be the point, since they’re playing non-characters, but such indifference in a film is only tolerable for so long.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Lapin
    Anyone with an interest in the intersection between film history and world history, or in the psychological powers of narrative cinema, should see Forbidden Films.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    Director Richard Loncraine (Wimbledon) and screenwriter Charlie Peters are able to carry this material to some unexpected places. It helps to have two of the most effortlessly charming actors in Hollywood as leads.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Lapin
    The film creates a kind of romantic view of the minutiae of running a museum, yet it’s barely concerned with the actual artwork housed within. Maybe this won’t matter to the audience, if they find the mere idea of a museum fascinating on its own.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    More attention paid to the narrative of some of these pieces, rather than simply their craft, could have been more enlightening.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Lapin
    The movie’s style consists of tossing up a lot of heartbreaking medical stories next to a characterization of the industry as a mysterious monolith, and letting viewers finish the correlation in their heads. When it’s possible to use the same line of reasoning to push both truth and lies, different tactics are in order.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Lapin
    The fun comes not from the pink neon frosting, but from seeing how Fox and co-writer Eli Bijaoui use it to decorate their familiar themes of authenticity, kitsch, and what it means to have progressive pride within a changing country.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Lapin
    Smith and Kravitz, both tremendously likable, simply don’t have enough to do together.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    The film doesn’t ask its stars for much, and they deliver.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    Once the Heavies arrive back on the scene, Raisani uses their presence—and the way the military dispatches them—to dodge complexity in favor of shooting stuff for freedom’s last stand. It’s Starship Troopers without the irony. But it looks nice.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    Writer-director Jefferson Moneo, tackling his first feature, has a good handle on storytelling economy, and gives his unique setting—the badlands of Saskatchewan, where the movie was filmed and where Moneo calls home—ample time to shine.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    Against The Sun, like its rudderless seacraft, goes with the path of least resistance: a talkfest where the men reiterate every obstacle they face out loud (all the better to show off period-friendly dialect), engage in some temporary breakdown of friendly bonds, and pray. There’s nothing wrong with this approach, but there’s also nothing special about it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    Even with a strong first half lampooning the vapidity of American news media, The Interview is the worst thing Rogen has ever done.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew Lapin
    Even for the third entry in a family franchise, the construction is lazy to the point of indifference.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 10 Andrew Lapin
    By the end of The Pyramid, found footage becomes just another possession to be buried alongside long-dead Pharaohs for use in the next life. Here’s hoping the next life has no return policy.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 10 Andrew Lapin
    The movie is dreadful, filled with painfully broad humor, grating performances, and acidly rendered characters.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew Lapin
    The film uses its setting as lazy shorthand: for the nostalgia of lost childhood, the virtues of independence, and the spiritual purity of acoustic rock. And the hero unearths all this meaning while only having to interact with one person older than 30.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    There are small attempts at narrative, but the primary lure of Pelican Dreams (for people who like this kind of stuff) is the copious footage of the birds doing goofy pelican things.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    A thin but pleasant documentary.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Lapin
    To the film’s mild credit, it’s the rare woman-in-peril thriller where the woman takes intelligent steps to defend herself.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Lapin
    Ultimately, the Tickells cram so much into their 90-minute cause machine that nothing really sticks, and seemingly crucial interviews soon become distant memories.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Lapin
    Once that rock gets rolling, Levitated Mass turns into a fun, loopy portrait of one crazy idea that became a SoCal public-art cornerstone.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    Director Thomas Allen Harris, who has a background in transmedia art, has made an earnest, though often sloppy, documentary on the essential role imagery plays in shaping the narrative of a people.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Lapin
    At the end of Winter In The Blood, there’s a general sense that not everything the Smiths attempted has worked, but it’s hard to separate the strong moments from the weak ones, much as Virgil can’t separate one day from the next.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Lapin
    Before the hokey third act, there’s much to like about Michael Berry’s border-crossing drama Frontera.

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