Andrew Sarris

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For 55 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 70% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Sarris' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Birds
Lowest review score: 10 Murder on the Orient Express
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 55
  2. Negative: 6 out of 55
55 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Sarris
    Wages of Fear rides for a cheap fall. Clouzot has copped out with cheap irony. [25 May 1967, p.31]
    • Village Voice
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Sarris
    The plot is sometimes too odd, the style too strained, but the movie holds you just the same. Jack Nicholson plays skillfully and honestly against the sure-fire pathos of the alienated loner, the fallen angel in life’s game of musical chairs.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Sarris
    If it were even remotely realistic, it would be intolerable, but the first half of its premise, Bronson as a bleeding-heart liberal who turns, because of a personal tragedy into a gun-toting vigilante, is so patently unconvincing as to make the payoff an irresistibly entertaining exercise in backlash titillation. [29 Aug 1974, p.65]
    • Village Voice
    • 77 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew Sarris
    Let me report simply that A Clockwork Orange manifests itself on the screen as a painless, bloodless, and ultimately pointless futuristic fantasy...The last third of the movie is such a complete bore that even audiences of confirmed Kubrickians have drowned out smatterings of applause with prolonged hissing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Sarris
    A pleasure to watch from beginning to end. [21 Oct 1965, p.21]
    • Village Voice
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Sarris
    It is not even bad enough to be perversely amusing. Liz's first entrance is grotesque enough to prepare us for that high point of self-parody when she asks Julius Caesar (Rex Harrison) if he smells anything burning as the library of Alexandria goes up in smpke, but there are not enough of these pungent moments to relieve the soul-destroying tedium of little people lost on big sets in the most expensive session of hide-and-seek ever to masquerade as a movie. [20 June 1963, p.13]
    • Village Voice
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Sarris
    The Ipcress File was reasonably entertaining while I was watching it, but after it was over I felt I'd been had... Among the tiresome directorial tricks in The Ipcress File is the repetitively off-angle anti-climax with the heavies feeding parking meters, hibernating in libraries, and plotting at band concerts. Nothing happens most of the time, and this is supposed to be funny and ironic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Sarris
    Pleasantly inoffensive. [29 Jul 1965, p.8]
    • Village Voice
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Sarris
    Psycho should be seen at least three times by any discerning film-goer, the first time for the sheer terror of the experience, and on this occasion I fully agree with Hitchcock that only a congenital spoilsport would reveal the plot; the second time for the macabre comedy inherent in the conception of the film; and the third for all the hidden meanings and symbols lurking beneath the surface of the first American movie since “Touch of Evil” to stand in the same creative rank as the great European films. [This was Mr. Sarris's first appearance in the Voice.]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Sarris
    The Last Detail is the first good honest-to-goodness American movie of 1974.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Sarris
    Point Blank never makes too much sense. But the forward momentum of Lee Marvin's mysterious vendetta against the skyscraper underworld manages to overcome Boorman's laborious exposition. [19 Oct 1967, p.31]
    • Village Voice
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew Sarris
    Jules and Jim is that rarity of rarities, a genuinely romantic film. [03 May 1962, p.11]
    • Village Voice
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Sarris
    Nichols has actually committed all the classic errors of the sophisticated stage director let loose on the unsophisticated movies. For starters, he has underestimated the power of the spoken word in his search for visual pyrotechnics.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew Sarris
    Easy Rider displays an assortment of excellences that lifts it above the run and ruck of its genre. [03 Jul 1969, p.45]
    • Village Voice
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Sarris
    Tommy is turning out to be the kind of movie most people probably like more than they care to admit. Modest charm and unpretentiousness are hardly the qualities that I ever thought I would associate with Ken Russell, but there you are, and there Tommy is. [31 Mar 1975, p.68]
    • Village Voice
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Sarris
    After two hours of which I felt almost every minute, I could find only a handful of positive things to say about this production. [25 Jul 1974, p.67]
    • Village Voice
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Sarris
    I thought there were about 11 good minutes in it, and the rest confused and uncertain. [22 Jul 1971, p.55]
    • Village Voice
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Sarris
    The film doesn't succeed even on its own dubious terms, the phony soliloquies of the salesmen while driving ostensibly alone being particularly disconcerting and unconvincing and ultimately unrevealing. [01 May 1969, p.48]
    • Village Voice
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Sarris
    The Long Goodbye rides off furiously in too many different directions with too many gratuitously Godardian camera movements to make even one good movie. [29 Nov 1973, p.84]
    • Village Voice
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Sarris
    California Split never comes to a very fine point in the psychological development of its characters. California Split is thus more about moment-to-moment living than momentous life. [03 Oct 1974, p.81]
    • Village Voice
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew Sarris
    A pretentious parable that manages to shrivel into drivel.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew Sarris
    Sam Peckinpah's Convoy is not merely a bad movie, but a terrible movie. Anyone can make a bad movie--only a misguided talent can manage to be terrible. [17 July 1978, p.44]
    • Village Voice
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Sarris
    Help does not indicate that Lester has depleted his bag of tricks, but rather that he is too addicted to fragmentation for its own sake. [09 Sep 1965, p.15]
    • Village Voice
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Sarris
    The Birds is here, and what a joy to behold a self-contained movie which does not feed parasitically on outside cultural references—Chekhov, Synge, O’Neill, Genet, Behan, Melville, or what have you. Drawing from the relatively invisible literary talents of Daphne DuMaurier and Evan Hunter, Alfred Hitchcock has fashioned a major work of cinematic art, and cinematic is the operative term here, not literary or sociological.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Sarris
    By any interpretation, Donovan's Reef is a beautiful example of cinematic art, and the atavistic desire to let the movie sweep over the spectator without disruptive analysis is at least understandable. [01 Aug 1963, p.13]
    • Village Voice
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Sarris
    Mart Crowley's brilliantly bitchy lines are worth standing on line for, and the original off-Broadway cast stands up well on the screen. [28 May 1970, p.53]
    • Village Voice
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Sarris
    Kubrick goes through the motions with a hula hoop and the munching of potato chips, but there is nothing intuitive or abandoned about the man-nymphet relationship. The Director's heart is apparently elsewhere. [05 Jul 1962, p.11]
    • Village Voice
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Sarris
    Like it or not, Walking tall is saying something very important to many people, and it is saying it with accomplished artistry. [21 Feb 1974, p.61]
    • Village Voice
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Sarris
    The spectacle of people in Hollywood trying to do something different in a western at this late date is curiously reassuring. [09 Sep 1965, p.15]
    • Village Voice
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Sarris
    The director's deepest instincts are less epic than dramatic, with the result that he gets sidetracked more often than his errant hero. The picturesque is gained too often at the expense of the picaresque, and the contour of a legend is obscured time and again by the pointless intimacy of a close-up. [09 Jan 1964, p.12]
    • Village Voice

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