For 123 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anita Singh 's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Crown: Season 3
Lowest review score: 20 Gangs of London: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 52 out of 123
  2. Negative: 2 out of 123
123 tv reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    It all hangs together well, with the mysterious circumstances of Chloe’s death acting as an additional plot device. Ultimately, it’s a commentary on social media.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    For all its sci-fi stylings, Severance will ring true for anyone trapped in a job they hate.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    If only the script were as delightful as the surroundings.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Anita Singh
    Prehistoric Planet is a stunning feat of CGI. The dinosaurs look as real as any animal you see in a wildlife documentary. ... Channel your inner six-year-old and enjoy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    It plays out like a passable Channel 5 daytime film, not a supposedly prestige series from HBO. The adaptation is so lazy that episodes begin with the lead characters reading lines straight into the camera, rather than anyone making the effort to work them into the script.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    It all feels as dated as Miami Vice’s fashion sense.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    Director Clio Barnard (The Selfish Giant) has always been stronger on atmosphere than plot. She and writer, Anna Symon, have produced something flat, in which moments of high drama or strong emotion seem overdone.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    This is where the drama excels – showing us how overworked and under pressure these young doctors are, and how much they’re winging it with no experience and not much clue what they’re doing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    The series takes its time to uncover the problems going on beneath the surface of this family. Kathleen is played in flashback by Toni Collette, giving us a chance to understand the victim in a way that the documentary could never deliver.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    For those who like to get into the nitty-gritty of history, this is illuminating stuff. And at the centre of it all is Roberts, flashing that megawatt smile and bringing depth to the depiction of a woman who in her day was often reduced to caricature.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    What we end up with is an underdog story, as the Brits fight to defend their agency from a takeover by appalling Americans. By the end, you may even be rooting for them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    It is the relationship between the leads that keeps the thing going, and I’m only sad that Christie didn’t write more mysteries for them to solve.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    Every episode needs to push further, either to embrace the weirdness or to deliver an emotional gut-punch. None of them do.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    This six-part series strays into homage, right down to replicating the moment in which Palmer gropes for his glasses to bring the room into focus. ... Cole homes in on the character’s insolence and aloofness, but doesn’t deliver on charm.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    About 20 minutes in, I wondered if I had missed the first episode and was mistakenly watching the second. ... Writer Sarah Solemani has described her show as “an exhilarating, suspenseful, sexy journey”. Not yet, it isn’t.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    The couple’s amicable separation soon descends into rancour, in scenes which ring true. And if elsewhere it strains believability – how is this law firm functioning, with all the madness going on? – who cares. It’s enjoyable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    If only the show had committed either to OTT comedy – the kind of thing Reilly was born to do – or to serious drama (Rob Morgan, as Johnson’s watchful father, brings a rare dignity to his scenes). But McKay’s attention is on the flashy surface detail rather than the heart of the story.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    There isn’t a single sympathetic note. ... It is effective as an invitation to gawp at the upper classes, and reassure ourselves that we are better than them. And it looks beautiful – the costumes, the make-up, the interiors. The high production values and the quality cast give the impression of a premium product. But the period tropes are lazy.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Anita Singh
    Language is no barrier when the drama is such a thing of beauty.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    It’s solidly entertaining, well-acted and well-plotted. Little details from the books (such as Slough House’s Barbican location) are accurately represented.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    I’d happily watch a show that just concerned itself with Rani (Rhianne Barreto) and John (Darren Boyd) and jettison the rest. Rani in particular has an interesting family life, shoplifting as a way of rebelling against her parents pressuring her to get into Oxford. But the others ­– Walken aside – are dull, with poor Myrna only present so she can act as a woke counterpoint to John’s diatribes about transgender vegans.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    As played by Claudia Jessie, Eloise is one of the best things here, bringing a spark that is missing from some of the bigger performances. There are times when the central relationship between Anthony and Kate seems to drag on without much passion. But after bingeing the series - in the service of this review, dear reader - their romance swept me away in the end.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    Shining Vale – which Horgan has co-written with Jeff Astrof – is billed as a comedy-horror but it hovers around in the space between the two because it’s neither screamingly funny nor remotely frightening. ... At least Shining Vale is attempting to tackle it in a light-hearted style, rather than bleak drama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    It’s not terrible, if you’d like to while away the hours watching a thriller that won’t tax your brain, and there are a couple of decent twists. It just could have been so much better.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    The Dropout slowly draws you in, because the stakes are so much higher and Holmes’s rise is enthralling.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    After a well-paced opening episode the plot starts to drag, mainly when it focuses on a female character, Freydís Eiríksdóttir (Frida Gustavsson), back in Scandinavia while the main action takes place in England. It is much better when giving us battle scenes, or the machinations involving Æthelred's callow son, Edmund, and shrewd widow, Emma of Normandy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Anita Singh
    If you can tolerate Brosnahan’s mile-a-minute delivery, which doesn’t let up even when she’s arrested for soliciting, there are some great ensemble scenes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Anita Singh
    Finally, a television thriller that doesn’t feel formulaic. ... Dornan plays the role just right: his man with no name is an enigma.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    The programme-makers, including Smith as executive producer, aren’t sure where to pitch it. It doesn’t have Euphoria levels of hard-hitting content, but it doesn’t have any fun either.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Anita Singh
    [Inventing Anna] takes this fascinating story of a con artist who scammed Manhattan society and breezes through it with all the depth of an Emily in Paris episode.

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