For 1,770 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Manchester by the Sea
Lowest review score: 0 Self/less
Score distribution:
1770 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Coogan and Brydon might scoff at such sentimentality, but over the course of the Trip films, they’ve shown us that world, at its most aspirationally easeful and epicurean. Even more brilliantly — and affectingly — they’ve constructed a world between them, an airy, reality-adjacent universe conjured in billowing clouds of witticisms, idle observations, passive-aggressive feints and silent, solitary reflections. Did they ever really live there? Maybe not. But it’s been a delightful place to visit.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The comedy that Feldstein and the filmmakers find in Johanna’s often disastrous attempts to become herself keeps the movie afloat; what keeps it tethered to reality is the universal drama of a young woman finding her voice without losing her soul.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Suffice it to say that, in addition to celebrating the energy, enterprise and idealism of America’s postwar generation, Spaceship Earth provides a sobering primer in how some dreams die, and others are strangled mercilessly in their cribs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Written and directed with tart intelligence by Alice Wu, and featuring some dazzling breakout performances, this breezy, self-aware and utterly adorable coming-of-age tale keeps one eye on literary and cinematic classics, and the other firmly on a future full of exploration, self-expression and buoyant expectation.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Intriguing, marvelously inventive documentary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Equal parts celebration and self-congratulation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With its clean staging and coolly mannered style, Selah and the Spades reaches back to Wes Anderson, Whit Stillman and even Stanley Kubrick; this is a film in which nearly every image looks worked over and carefully polished, with no detail left unconsidered.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Does the world need another Bill Cunningham documentary? Yes, it turns out. More than ever.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    With empathy and outrage that cut equally deeply, Hittman reminds us: This is a girl’s life in a man’s world.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In this unsparing but deeply compassionate film, viewers get a chance to see the fatigue, stress and bewilderment of modern life for what they are: not the regrettable side effects of market-driven progress, but the results of cynicism and greed, and the unfathomable human cost of wanting what we want, right now.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A clever slice of regional noir that carries a gale-force punch beneath its modest, soft-spoken trappings.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Bennett claims her own form of autonomy with the movie itself, which could be read as an actress’s decision to stop hoping for good scripts to arrive over the transom and make her own luck.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    We might go into a Kelly Reichardt movie thinking we’ll be told a story, but we emerge with our consciousness subtly and radically altered.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Ann Hornaday
    A movie straining so hard to be edgily of-the-moment that it can’t help but be utterly irrelevant, strives to impress viewers with sadistic killings, oozing viscera and extravagant gushers of blood. But its most dramatic spectacle might be the sight of a facile, lazy enterprise being hoist on its own cynical petard.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A handsome-looking if occasionally dull affair.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    What ensues in Corpus Christi, Jan Komasa’s absorbing and spiritually attuned drama, turns out to be a fascinating exercise in fake-it-till-you-make-it, with a hefty dose of fatalism and small-town hypocrisy thrown in for maximum provocation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A delicious slow-burn of a movie, the kind of coming-of-age tale that looks familiar on the surface only to reveal hidden depths of beauty and meaning.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Once Were Brothers is enormously valuable, if only as a reminder of what an extraordinary run this extraordinary convergence of talents enjoyed until their final show on Thanksgiving Day in 1976 (meticulously captured by Scorsese in the magnificent documentary “The Last Waltz”).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In Akin’s capable hands, And Then We Danced becomes an affecting testament to heartbreak, resilience and emotional expression at its most liberated and life-affirming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    What She Said pays fitting homage, not just to a great writer but to a vanished age.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    True to its title, Portrait of a Lady on Fire generates more than its share of heat, even if it never truly becomes an engulfing flame.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    With Les Misérables, Ly delivers a passionate protest on behalf of an entire generation, whose future has largely been foreclosed. His, on the other hand, is astonishingly bright.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In the judicious hands of director and co-writer Destin Daniel Cretton, it feels not new exactly, but fresh and urgent and more timely than ever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A Hidden Life is indisputably the finest work Malick has produced in eight years, as an examination of faith, conviction and sacrifice, but also as proof of concept for his own idiosyncratic style. It marks an exhilarating return to form but also, more crucially, content.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In Gerwig’s capable hands, though, even the most familiar contours of Little Women feel new, not because she has the temerity to redefine Alcott’s masterpiece, but because she subtly reframes it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    For its part, Bombshell tells a crucial chapter of that larger tale with coolheaded style and heated indignation. Its aim might be narrow, but it hits the target.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    1917 is impressive but oddly distancing; ultimately stirring but too often gimmicky.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    This is one of the most exciting breakout films of the year, introducing Attanasio as a vibrant new voice in American cinema. More, please.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This lively, intriguing and insistently humanistic flight of fancy — imagined conversations between hard-line conservative Pope Benedict XVI and his more progressive successor, Pope Francis — brims with wit, warmth and some tantalizing what-ifs. Whether the fact that it’s mostly pure speculation will get in the way of the audience’s enjoyment will depend on each viewer’s threshold for artistic license.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The fun here — and there is a lot of it — is to be had simply in allowing an ensemble of game, generous-spirited actors to give their all in service to the fine art of misdirection and mayhem.

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