For 1,640 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Edge of Heaven
Lowest review score: 0 Orphan
Score distribution:
1640 movie reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A well-seasoned, handsomely cured slab of showbiz schmaltz that hits all the right pleasure centers. With equal parts glitz and grit, Cooper has successfully navigated the most perilous shoals of making a classic narrative his own, managing to create one of its best iterations to date.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Accompanied, appropriately enough, by Bach piano pieces, The Children Act is an unmitigated pleasure to watch and listen to, primarily as a showcase for Thompson’s incomparable gifts as an actress.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    An absorbing, illuminating film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A film that feels like something conjured out of memory and magic, a poetic, often ecstatic re-creation of childhood that captures its ungovernable pleasures as vividly as its most threatening terrors.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A handsome production that delicately skewers literary-world pretensions and Great Man mythmaking. But primarily, The Wife offers viewers a chance to observe one of the finest — and most criminally underpraised — actresses of her generation working at the very top of her shrewd, subtle, superbly self-controlled game.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The result is a movie that feels both hard-edged and dreamy; punk-rock and lyrical; wised-up and unbearably tender.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    If Bowers’s present-day life has slowed down considerably, his memories haven’t, and the subject of Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood exerts his luridly voyeuristic pull, as he shares name after name of his most shocking exploits.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like the finest forebears of the rom-com genre — including its urtext, “Four Weddings and a Funeral” — Crazy Rich Asians indulges in the escapist pleasures of aspirational wealth, obscene consumerism and invidious judge-iness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Accompanied by an expressively lush jazz-blues score by Lee’s regular composer Terence Blanchard, BlacKkKlansman announces from the jump that viewers are in for a lush, sensory treat as Lee plays with the film vernacular he’s manipulated so adroitly and expressively for three decades.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    One of the great gifts of Far From the Tree is simple visibility, whereby viewers are given the opportunity to watch people live their lives, share their wisdom and flourish within the loving care of their family and friends.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In Puzzle, Macdonald has finally found a movie that she doesn’t need to steal, because it belongs to her completely.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Even its most irritating parts don’t fatally damage a whole that works amazingly well, despite its own excesses.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Thanks to Burnham’s exuberant, alert writing and Fisher’s masterful command of vulnerability, anxiety, resilience and steadfast self-belief, Kayla emerges as an icon of her own — just by being herself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The best films teach you how to watch them within the first few minutes. Blindspotting is no exception. The film gets off to an exhilarating start, with split-screen images of Oakland, Calif., unspooling to the tune of a soaring aria.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Uplift winds up getting the better of “Don’t Worry,” in which Phoenix delivers an impressively committed performance that nonetheless can’t overcome the movie’s worship of Callahan’s most immature, solipsistic and self-dramatizing foibles. A movie that’s supposed to inspire winds up being irritating instead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This crafty sociological thriller, set amid the pristine townhouses and lawns of a quiet Reykjavik suburb, builds slowly but surely into a film that feels utterly of a piece with a much wider world.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    The director tries to infuse Shock and Awe with the taut procedural drama of “All the President’s Men,” “Spotlight” or “The Post.” But he winds up demonstrating just how difficult it is to make shoe-leather journalism entertaining, much less artful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    This is a movie of myriad worthy, even urgently necessary, ideas; when it reaches its climax, it goes completely haywire in a preposterous, increasingly scattershot sci-fi pastiche.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Although Whitney follows a familiar structure, Macdonald infuses it with artful editorial choices, marking the chapters of Houston’s life with brief but vivid montages of the times in which she lived.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In Damsel, sibling filmmakers David and Nathan Zellner have created the perfect western for the #MeToo era, delightfully twisting and torquing the traditional woman-in-jeopardy narrative to create a clever, comical and uncannily relevant allegory.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    As “Guardians” and, later, “Deadpool” doubled down on the snark, “Ant-Man” kept things light, its playfulness made all the more endearing by the boyish, twinkle-eyed persona of its star, Paul Rudd.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The mopey, midwinter atmosphere of Nancy becomes increasingly and oppressively bleak, leavened only by Smith-Cameron’s spot-on portrayal of her character’s trembling, painfully fragile optimism.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This handsomely staged production plays like a soothingly thoughtful balm.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Tag
    The best way to appreciate this fitfully funny collection of japes and jests is to treat it like any teenage boy in your midst: Focus on the positives and know that even its worst is only a phase.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Benefits from a sensitive, even-tempered tone, as well as terrific supporting performances from Spencer, Ann Dowd (as Alex’s status-obsessed mom) and a scene-stealing Amy Landecker, who plays an ambivalent therapy client of Greg’s.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Creepy, creepy, creepy. Writer-director Ari Aster makes an impressively unnerving debut with Hereditary, a meticulously crafted horror thriller.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Neville has created a film that operates both as a dewy-eyed nostalgia trip and stirring appeal for civility.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Filmworker is a tribute to the unsung artisans, assistants, best boys and girl Fridays whose indelible contributions make movies not just possible, but magical.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    At its best, The Gospel According to Andre gives viewers the rare chance to get to know someone who, until now, has mostly been known as that impeccably turned-out gentleman who seems to know everybody at the annual Costume Institute gala.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    At once ruminative and shocking, godwardly inclined and repellently graphic, First Reformed is indisputably the finest film Schrader has directed since his sensitive adaptation of Russell Banks’s novel “Affliction.”

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