For 1,913 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Fits
Lowest review score: 0 Tammy
Score distribution:
1913 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The classic college party-crawl comedy gets a smart, self-aware refresh with Emergency, a funny, adroitly executed satire that manages to find genuine laughs in the unlikeliest places.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    If this all sounds too insufferable and in-jokey, fear not: Gormican, with the help of his fabulously game ensemble cast, keeps the balloon afloat with a light touch, crisp pacing and an overarching mood that’s more goofily endearing than smugly self-amused.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    As arresting and elaborate as the images are in The Northman, there are just as many sequences that revert strictly to pulpy, B-movie type.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Top it off with Pinaud’s final dedication, and The Rose Maker turns into a film that wears its emotions lightly but generously, like dew on a blush-colored petal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    In The Automat, Hurwitz and writer Michael Levine trace the rise and fall of Horn & Hardart, illuminating not just a surprisingly compelling corporate history, but a facet of American culture that feels both brimmingly optimistic and thoroughly extinct.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Based on a spare, exquisitely crafted novel by Graham Swift, this thoughtful but ultimately inert dramatization respects its source material and tries valiantly to give arresting visual expression to its finely layered themes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The two actors have charisma to burn, finely tuned comic chops and the kind of smoldering physical star power that manages to look effortless and superhuman at the same time. But even gifts as prodigious as Bullock’s and Tatum’s can’t keep “The Lost City” afloat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Master might be a horror film, but its scariest elements are off screen, in the form of the persistent social realities that inspired it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    After Yang again demonstrates Kogonada’s mastery of form, framing and composition. But audiences will be forgiven for wanting to reach through the screen to mess it up a little, if only to inject some recognizable warmth and spontaneity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Welcome to “The Batman,” yet another lugubrious, laboriously grim slog masquerading as a fun comic book movie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Kuosmanen has given us another affair to remember, this time about love as something for which you’d not just go to the ends of the Earth, but to the beginning of time.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Trier and Reinsve have gifted audiences with a movie that understands the ecstasy of diving into the unknown, the flush of new love, the beauty of connecting amid unspeakable loss.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Ann Hornaday
    It’s a movie that’s all too happy simply to go through the motions when its star is clearly capable of busting bigger, more interesting moves. Luckily, there are other films in the sea. This is one that Lopez should have left at the altar.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Filmmaker Clint Bentley makes a tender, visually poetic feature directorial debut with “Jockey,” a closely observed portrait of a man embarking on the downslope of his career.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Thanks to his courage and Rasmussen’s compassion and creativity, “Flee” morphs from a tale of dispossession to a testament to the power of narrative — to overtake a life, and to liberate it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Licorice Pizza is at its best — and is genuinely charming — when it’s simply focused on Gary and Alana — two mixed-up kids trying to make their way in a world that feels promising and perilous in equal measure.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    For such a compact and efficient vessel, “The Tragedy of Macbeth” pours forth seemingly endless wellsprings of language, emotion and psychological depth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Wachowski seems to be at war with her audience, rewarding them with deep-cut callbacks one moment only to roll her eyes at the entire enterprise the next.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Maggie Gyllenhaal makes a quietly astonishing directorial debut with “The Lost Daughter,” a crafty treatise on maternal ambivalence that delivers an unsettling emotional wallop.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Not content with simply stoking rage and self-righteous superiority, McKay dares to infuse Don’t Look Up with an authentic, unironic sense of grief.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Spielberg and Kaminski have enjoyed a fruitful collaboration for decades, but their work on West Side Story brings the partnership to breathtakingly poetic expressive heights.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    For all its beauty and poignancy, The Hand of God suffers from a strange paradox: It goes on too long but somehow doesn’t go far enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    In this mesmerizing, revelatory and deeply compassionate film, viewers are left with an indelible impression of girlhood at its most precarious and indomitable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like The Father last year, The Humans makes the set a character in itself: Karam has concocted a diabolically creaky duplex whose wonky corners and jury-rigged improvements take on an increasingly sinister patina as the meal progresses.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Johnny’s tentative dip into family life artfully captures the tedium, terror and confounding ecstasy of parenthood, but it more eloquently conveys the pain and discovery involved in simply trying to do one’s best.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Once again demonstrating her own strong, clear vision — not to mention superb control of her craft — Campion proves her ability to illuminate hidden truths and let us see what was hiding in plain sight all along.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Will Smith delivers a ferocious, all-consuming performance in King Richard, a thoroughly entertaining portrait of Richard Williams — better known as Venus and Serena’s father.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    For its frequently painful contours, there’s an abundance of pleasures to be had in Belfast, Kenneth Branagh’s irresistible memoir about growing up amid the Troubles in Northern Ireland.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Souvenir Part II may bring an end to the introduction of a marvelous filmmaker to a wider world. But far more promisingly, it suggests what, with luck, will be an exhilarating next chapter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Zhao might have her eye on the nuances, but ultimately even a filmmaker with her sensitivity and vision can’t bend the Great Marvel Imperative to her will.

Top Trailers