For 1,660 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Inside Llewyn Davis
Lowest review score: 0 Undiscovered
Score distribution:
1660 movie reviews
    • 93 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With its air of intimacy and fractious affections, Shoplifters feels like “The Borrowers” by way of Yasujiro Ozu, a discreetly observed drama about resourcefulness, loyalty and resilience in an era of obscene income inequality and a fatally frayed civic safety net.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Did you find “The Favourite” just too weird, too raunchy, too . . . too? Perhaps Mary Queen of Scots will be more your cup.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Roma, a masterful drama by Alfonso Cuarón, is many things at once: epic and intimate, mythic and mundane.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A deliciously diabolical comedy of ill manners and outré palace intrigue.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Creed II is a respectable if not revelatory sequel to the sequel, even if it lacks its predecessor’s grace and narrative texture.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Most confoundingly, it sheds no light on Hart himself: a man who steadfastly insisted on maintaining his privacy, whose impressive intellect was couched within an aloof, withholding persona, remains a cipher, the missing core of a movie that’s nominally about him, but can’t seem to get a bead on its own protagonist.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Most winningly, Green Book puts two of the finest screen actors working today in a sexy turquoise Cadillac, letting them loose on a funny, swiftly-moving chamber piece bursting with heart, art and soul.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    It proves how smarts and style can elevate even the pulpiest material into something shrewd, socially attuned and bracingly observant. Rarely has a movie been so illuminated by a single character simply breaking into a smile, and rarely has a smile been so unequivocally earned.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Finally, one of our finest actresses has been given material that calls on her to utterly transform herself — vocally, physically, seemingly existentially — and prove how gifted she’s been all along.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The result is a classic on a par with “Winesburg, Ohio” and “Our Town,” a narrow slice of contemporary American life that manages to be both admiring, yet capable of polite skepticism.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In this immersive, often deliciously sensuous documentary portrait of the late opera star Maria Callas, viewers are treated to another rise-and-fall story of a great but tortured artist, this one punctuated by the occasional real-life bed of roses and pleasure cruise.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Winds up being giddily entertaining, first as an exercise in so-bad-it’s-funny kitsch, and ultimately as something far more meaningful and thrilling. Every now and then, a film comes along that defies the demands of taste, formal sophistication, even artistic honesty to succeed simply on the level of pure, inexplicable pleasure. Bohemian Rhapsody is just that cinematic unicorn: the bad movie that works, even when it shouldn’t.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Mid90s” is often painful to watch as Stevie puts himself through the punishing rituals of proving his street bona fides. But Hill takes even the most treacherous dangers in stride, suffusing his story with as much tenderness as stark terror.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    You’ve never seen Melissa McCarthy like this. And she’s not even the best thing about her new movie.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The result, Bisbee ’17, is a fascinating exercise in nonfiction filmmaking as a performative, interdisciplinary, collective act, as well as a provocative inquiry into how selective memory, ideology, shame and unspeakable trauma shape what we come to accept as official history.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    As the chief avatar for parental distress, Carell is sympathetic if not always entirely convincing: The toughest moments of Beautiful Boy simply seem out of his range as an actor, especially when he takes reportorial zeal one step too far by trying hard drugs himself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Like its protagonist, First Man doesn’t go in for theatrics or gratuitous emotion, however justified. It gets the job done, with professionalism, immersive authenticity and unadorned feeling, of which Armstrong himself might just have approved, however apprehensively.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The pure athletics of Free Solo, which chronicles Honnold’s months-long training regimen as well as his subsequent attempts, would be spectacle enough to create an entertaining film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Old Man and the Gun ambles along with such unhurried, folksy ease that it’s easy to overlook the people — mostly women — Tucker leaves in his wake, victims who may not be physically scarred, but often look as if they will bear unseen injuries into the future nonetheless.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This is Audiard’s first English-language film, and he evinces sure instincts with both the visual and spoken vernaculars. The Sisters Brothers looks terrific and, propelled by Desplat’s beautiful music, ambles along with pleasing, if routinely episodic, ease until its unexpectedly touching conclusion.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A well-seasoned, handsomely cured slab of showbiz schmaltz that hits all the right pleasure centers. With equal parts glitz and grit, Cooper has successfully navigated the most perilous shoals of making a classic narrative his own, managing to create one of its best iterations to date.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Accompanied, appropriately enough, by Bach piano pieces, The Children Act is an unmitigated pleasure to watch and listen to, primarily as a showcase for Thompson’s incomparable gifts as an actress.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    An absorbing, illuminating film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A film that feels like something conjured out of memory and magic, a poetic, often ecstatic re-creation of childhood that captures its ungovernable pleasures as vividly as its most threatening terrors.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A handsome production that delicately skewers literary-world pretensions and Great Man mythmaking. But primarily, The Wife offers viewers a chance to observe one of the finest — and most criminally underpraised — actresses of her generation working at the very top of her shrewd, subtle, superbly self-controlled game.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The result is a movie that feels both hard-edged and dreamy; punk-rock and lyrical; wised-up and unbearably tender.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    If Bowers’s present-day life has slowed down considerably, his memories haven’t, and the subject of Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood exerts his luridly voyeuristic pull, as he shares name after name of his most shocking exploits.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like the finest forebears of the rom-com genre — including its urtext, “Four Weddings and a Funeral” — Crazy Rich Asians indulges in the escapist pleasures of aspirational wealth, obscene consumerism and invidious judge-iness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Accompanied by an expressively lush jazz-blues score by Lee’s regular composer Terence Blanchard, BlacKkKlansman announces from the jump that viewers are in for a lush, sensory treat as Lee plays with the film vernacular he’s manipulated so adroitly and expressively for three decades.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    One of the great gifts of Far From the Tree is simple visibility, whereby viewers are given the opportunity to watch people live their lives, share their wisdom and flourish within the loving care of their family and friends.

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