For 196 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Benjamin Lee's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Moonlight
Lowest review score: 20 Happy Death Day 2U
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 52 out of 196
  2. Negative: 14 out of 196
196 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    It’s a bruising movie, being sold on the promise that it’s “scary as hell”, a quote that I worry will mislead expectant horror fans. The scariest thing about The Lodge is how human it all is.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    It’s a difficult, often quite brutal, viewing experience, as it needs to be given the subject matter, not only because of the fractured storytelling but because of the devastating lead performance from Hopkins.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    Chung’s nuanced portrait of a family figuring out their place in the world is both small and somehow rather grand.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    The Last Thing He Wanted is a thing that no one wanted.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    It’s elegantly constructed and precisely composed, with Durkin painstakingly recreating an era without falling into nostalgic overload. But it’s also a drama about a family that keeps us at a distance for the most part.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    It’s all so human and messy and it’s refreshing to see a director that doesn’t shy away from such complexity with Colangelo crafting a film that’s every bit as nuanced as the subject at hand.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    There’s a lived-in chemistry that’s missing from the pairing and the film’s great many awkward moments between them don’t feel quite as cutting or as uncomfortable as they should. It’s a dark comedy that feels too light.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    There’s a lot here to digest, a bitter cocktail with many confounding flavours and its abrasiveness will prove tough-going for some, especially those in search of a more polite and familiarly structured literary biopic. But for those willing to sink into the depths with Shirley, it’s a delicious journey down.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    There’s a whiff of familiarity haunting almost every scene and while it would have been rewarding to see Cooke and O’Conner take a few chances or add some more emotional depth, it’s a satisfying enough watch, best viewed with little investment and low expectations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    The Twitter-to-screen adaptation of Zola is as scrappy and imperfect as the original story but just as likable. There’s something unusually compelling about what Bravo does with the material that makes up for its missteps.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    It’s brand management dressed up as insight and while it’s not not entertaining, it’s certainly far from particularly revealing, playing more like a PR exercise then a festival-worthy feature.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    It’s ultimately a miracle that despite the tortured production process, Dolittle can most generously be described as passable for young, undiscerning viewers. It won’t charm or amuse you particularly but it’s not a catastrophe, the highest praise I can muster.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    What frustrates me most about Underwater is just how very little it brings to the table. It’s a solid, competently directed regurgitation of an oft-told tale that never manages to justify its own existence
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Benjamin Lee
    It’s an unwieldy and messy thing, drearily directed and boringly written, taking its agenda seriously yet not providing a robust enough framework to surround it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    It’s a film with something to say but it’s not all that good at saying it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    It’s a given that Hanks will nab at least a best supporting actor nomination but it would be all too easy to forget his co-star. The cynic-becomes-a-believer arc is age old but it unfolds here without cliche thanks to an emotionally intelligent script from Noah Harpster and Micah Fitzerman-Blue, but mainly because of a marvelous, prickly turn from Rhys.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    Lady and the Tramp works well enough on its own simple terms as watchable, competently made home viewing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    There’s intermittent fun to be had in this throwaway relaunch of the female secret agent franchise but the party is cut short by incoherent action and a clunky script.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    Let It Snow is a prime example of what happens when the Netflix algorithm machine spews out something that actually feels like a real movie. It ticks all the right buzzword boxes for the platform (YA, Christmas, romcom, cast filled with recognisable faces) but does so with such ebullience that you’ll fail to notice, or at least care about, the many strings being pulled throughout.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    It might look the part, with the director Paul Feig successfully capturing the glossy, tourist-friendly London one would crave from such a film, but the script feels like a rejected first draft with unfunny filler one-liners and a scrappy, ill-thought through narrative. It’s a beautifully wrapped Christmas gift that’s filled with rotten turkey leftovers.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Benjamin Lee
    Rather than screaming for them to go the other way, you'll be urging them to accept fate and die instead.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    As dated as its slow-mo zombie-killing opening credits, at times Zombieland: Double Tap feels like it was made directly after the original yet carelessly forgotten about. It’s rushed and dusty, a film more belonging on Crackle than the big screen, more expensively budgeted than the first yet mostly creatively bankrupt.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    The film is just a machine, slick but soulless and with parts in need of a touch-up. Not broken exactly, but more, ahem, fractured.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    While some of the nastier lurches in the third act will appease genre fans, the guff that surrounds them will probably confuse and ultimately alienate them, the film’s moving parts never really moving in unison.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    There’s an almost meta-maturity, as if Scorsese is also looking back on his own career, the film leaving us with a haunting reminder not to glamorise violent men and the wreckage they leave behind.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Benjamin Lee
    There’s little room to breathe in writer-director Chinonye Chukwu’s constricting, devastating drama Clemency, an intentionally airless film processing a tough subject through an unusual viewpoint.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    There’s a slicker, more coherent and ultimately more thematically audacious film to be made from the disparate elements that make up In the Shadow of the Moon but what we have is a lovable mess nonetheless. Its ambitions are easy to criticise but hard not to admire, a mad little movie with big ideas on its mind.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    Perhaps the film’s overwhelming ace is an overarching awareness of just how pointless it really is, made with the same disposability with which it should be consumed.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Benjamin Lee
    While the screenwriter, Brad Ingelsby, does root us in the minutiae of the trio’s day-to-day, it’s never in particularly interesting ways, and over an indulgent 135-minute runtime, we gradually grow tired of them, often questioning exactly why we need to know so much about their lives.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Benjamin Lee
    We’re in safe, formulaic territory here, think Calendar Girls with less nudity and more harmonising, and it’s the film’s strict adherence to the rules of the subgenre that proves to be both a blessing and a curse. It works for the most part because, when done well, there’s something irresistible about the formula ... But there are also times when Military Wives starts to creak.

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