For 834 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bilge Ebiri's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Amazing Grace
Lowest review score: 0 Dolittle
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 79 out of 834
834 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Maverick is enormously entertaining, but watching it makes for a surprisingly emotional experience. That’s partly due to what happens onscreen, but a lot of it has to do with the memories the film evokes — memories not just of the first movie but of everything that has happened to the world, and to us as viewers, since then.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 10 Bilge Ebiri
    Perhaps what’s most dispiriting about this Firestarter is how visually impoverished it is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    There’s an unflinching, near-clinical relentlessness to the picture, but therein lies its compassion and empathy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    In the end, Memory’s greatest asset might be that it knows exactly what it is — a fun combination of sleazoid action and surprising emotion. It’s the best kind of B-movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    In its broad strokes, The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent is a fairly by-the-numbers action comedy, one that sometimes wears Cage’s presence like a talisman against the bad juju of slipshod storytelling. But the talisman works because the film never loses sight of its touchingly nutty premise and because Cage remains a compelling actor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s a lot more like the movie we were worried the first one was going to be: baggy, bloated, and only sporadically engaging.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    Freed from the shackles of elaborate world-building or jokey, family-friendly tentpole-dom, this is a tight, brisk little over-the-top thriller, with plenty of atmosphere, effective jump scares, and a couple of genuinely moving performances at its heart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    One of the pleasures of a film like this is the knowledge that a new fold is always coming. Seen in that light, occasional narrative implausibilities (of both the psychological and physical kind) recede into the distance. The Outfit is imperfect, but it works perfectly.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    What makes Ahed’s Knee so powerful is the way the movie detonates before our eyes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s an assemblage of ideas from other popular films that just hangs there with little cohesion. It’s like watching a movie that hasn’t been made yet.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Abu-Assad has made his share of films about the cruel absurdity of life under Israeli occupation, but here he lets all sides have it
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Reeves loves these dead-end apocalyptic environments, and delights in tales that toy with the moral calculus of typical hero narratives. He has given us a Batman that he himself can believe in, not to mention a Batman that feels right for our times.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Cyrano is a delicate dream of a movie, the kind of film that feels like you might have merely imagined it — light on the surface but long on subconscious impact.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    When given the freedom, he can be one of the most overheated of directors, but the excess rarely feels cynical or cheap. In fact, it feels personal. You sense that he wants you to get excited about this stuff because he gets so excited about this stuff.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 40 Bilge Ebiri
    Part of the fun of movies like this is the opportunity for the audience to immerse themselves in the procedural minutiae of these worlds, but there’s precious little of that here. Everything is so empty, so incomplete. Blacklight feels like a synopsis waiting for a story.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Playground is bleak, bleak stuff. It’s also electrifying.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    Jackass Forever is a kinder, gentler Jackass, but thankfully, it’s not a more mature one.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    There’s nothing particularly surprising about the story, but Finnish director Juho Kuosmanen finds a way to make an old tale feel new.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    The Pink Cloud is so good at portraying our pandemic reality that it becomes harder to discern its other, subtler concerns. I was impressed, agitated, terrified, depressed by this movie — but I also couldn’t help feeling like I had maybe not ultimately seen the film its director wanted me to see.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Bilge Ebiri
    This new Scream is so determined to be a Scream movie that it forgets the primary, unstated rule established by the original Scream: You can sell anything to us, so long as you make it scary.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Bilge Ebiri
    While there aren’t any genuine belly laughs in the new movie, there are plenty of modestly likable, chucklesome ones. That ain’t nothing in this terrible, terrible world.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    As further demonstration of the director’s already impressive ability to build stomach-gnawing suspense out of everyday interactions, the movie is well worth seeing. But it also represents a step back in some ways. Farhadi is one of the world’s great filmmakers, but the generosity of spirit that was so pivotal to his earlier work seems to be in retreat in his latest.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s not just the action and the magic that flop. Even the film’s more intimate moments fall flat.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    With previous films like the Oscar-winning Great Beauty and the politically charged biopics Il Divo and Loro, Sorrentino indulged his fondness for boisterous, bunga-bunga stylization. He is contemporary cinema’s mad poet of unchecked hedonism. But he holds himself back this time around. The Hand of God isn’t realistic or gritty (or, God forbid, subtle), but it is more subdued.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Whether this new picture is a masterpiece, or a masterful reimagining of a troublesome original, will have to remain in the eye of the beholder.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Bilge Ebiri
    In some ways, it encapsulates the director’s best and worst instincts. It might be his most personal film, a genuine effort to understand the connection between two of his key obsessions, spiritual faith and human impulse. It’s also hard to shake the feeling that the film wants to outrage us into a response, but its supposed transgressions often feel tired and pro forma.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s a movie that sings, poignantly, from many times at once.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    When King Richard works, it sings.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Branagh wisely gives the movie the quality of a childhood memory, of stolen moments and eavesdropped conversations.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Bilge Ebiri
    Despite the ticking clock of Finch’s rapidly progressing illness, the movie doesn’t build up much urgency or excitement. The script is pretty thin, almost all premise and little incident. But director Miguel Sapochnik has the eye to make this world compellingly hostile and bleak, and that counts for something.

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