For 383 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill Cosford's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 The Untouchables
Lowest review score: 0 Halloween III: Season of the Witch
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 84 out of 383
383 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    The movie is at its most chilling, oddly enough, when one or another chase isn't going on. The real fun begins when Ryan becomes desperate and goes for help to his old pals in intelligence. This is prime Clancy material -- high-tech surveillance, computerized image enhancement, Intelligence with a capital "I." [5 June 1992, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    It's a big, likable movie without quite enough jokes, but the stars take turns with the burden, carrying the thing in relays. They're fun to watch. [16 Dec 1986, p.D4]
    • Miami Herald
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Penny Marshall proves deft at blending the silly stuff with enough action to generate a bit of suspense; the mix is that of Beverly Hills Cop. And the script, though the work of a whole crowd -- almost always a bad sign -- has marvelous moments. [10 Oct 1986, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    The writing is good and the direction rarely flabby, but the real strength of Buckaroo is in a large and enthusiastic cast, led by Peter Weller, who plays the title character with a perfect deadpan. [11 Aug 1984, p.B7]
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is the dopiest and most congenial in the series, an indication that the producers have at last acknowledged that what they're dealing with is not science fiction or adventure, but a kind of cosmic fluke. [27 Nov. 1986, p.F1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    The Undiscovered Country looks and feels more like a movie and less like a TV-family reunion. Still, the allegory is labored to say the least. [6 Dec. 1991, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    Slacker is not always so purposefully creepy, but it's often as darkly funny; none of its characters is what you'd call normal, but the film's off-kilter view is such that they seem utterly in tune with their odd lives and odder times. [29 May 1992, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Leigh is obviously a major talent of the English film resurgence, which may already have peaked but nonetheless offers hopes of its own. His loose way of making films -- the wandering camera, the scenes that seem to invent themselves as they go along -- somehow accommodates a genuine comic intelligence, which usually requires the tightest of controls. [2 June 1989, p.7]
    • Miami Herald
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    It's not a wonderful family, and the lives thus illuminated aren't sweet at all. But the movie is both things. In his sheer affinity for the human, Leigh approaches the great Jean Renoir. What fun to watch. [21 Feb. 1992, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    What we have here is a story out of early American history as retold by American pulp fiction, staged by a director with a sure touch for melodrama. [25 Sep 1992, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    What Spielberg does is use the Lucas tricks to propel an old-fashioned fantasy, played broadly enough so that the laughs come as easily as the thrills. [23 May 1984, p.B1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    JFK
    JFK is staggering in its power. [20 Dec 1991, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Keaton is funny when she's tough, and funny when she's soft; the Baby Boom combination, for all the film's calculations and shameless cooing (the baby's dubbed, for pity's sake), is quite appealing. [7 Oct 1987, p.D8]
    • Miami Herald
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    It has several amiable performances, including Lithgow's usual nice guy, Lainie Kazan's savagely nosy neighbor, Margaret Langrick's petulant teen and Don Ameche as a bullion- hearted Bigfoot expert. And like Harry, in its own ham-handed, goofy way the film means so well. What the heck. [5 June 1987, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Carpenter keeps it sweet. This means muting his fabled skills as an "action" director in favor of plumbing the cutes, and it means that Starman isn't the grown-up entertainment that it could have been. But it's not your everyday romance, either, and it's hard to hate. [14 Dec 1984, p.18]
    • Miami Herald
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Bill Cosford
    This is a big, beautifully designed movie in which the filmmakers' intelligence is everywhere; it's the product of a special vision. And Brian De Palma continues to be good news from Hollywood. [3 June 1987, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Weird Science is a nerd-reform film, down to its dewy finale in which all concerned have learned a Lesson About Life. But it's almost always fun. At its best, it's more proof that Hughes is one of American movies' unusual talents. He's an original. [2 Aug 1985, p.C1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    This third (and, I would guess, last) installment does what few sequels do. It actually extends the story into its logical destination rather than merely recycling familiar characters and situations. It's not terrifying. It is an audacious first film. It is fully as dreadful as fans might hope. Don't miss it. [22 May 1992, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    The Road Warrior shows what happens when filmmakers learn something on their way to the sequel. Though the action here follows a predictable course (it's high-tech Shane), the milieu is fascinating, the story sophisticated where Mad Max was crude. [25 May 1982, p.D5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Poltergiest is no nonstop scream express; at times it pulls its punches (Spielberg wants that PG rating), and at times its effects are bigger than life and less than terrifying. But like Spielberg's Jaws, which was a perfect genre movie, Poltergeist does what it's supposed to do about as well as it can be done.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    Burton is a first-rate stylist, but this time he's actually better at suggesting the inner life of his characters. [19 June 1992, p.G6]
    • Miami Herald
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    Remarkably, director Albert Magnoli is able to use a single moment of melodrama to give this story a measure of depth. And from that point on, Purple Rain is improbably successful at tugging on the heartstrings as well as shaking the rafters. It winds up a love story, and one with power. [27 July 1984, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    This is one mean little movie, fully deserving of some sort of warning badge to keep out the faint of heart and blue of nose. It's not, by any stretch of the imagination, pornography, so disregard the onetime X (the film is being distributed without a rating). But make no mistake: Henry will give you the creeps. [10 August 1990, p.G13]
    • Miami Herald
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Beauty and the Beast is so funny, exciting and suspenseful that its obvious moral (appearance can mean nothing; it's what's inside that counts) is engaging rather than perfunctory. [22 Nov 1991, p.G11]
    • Miami Herald
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Ward does manage to pump the film with tension in the climactic, will-the-Indians-beat-the-Yankees sequence, and I found Major League hard to resist in its last 20 minutes or so -- even though it's sappy enough to make Levinson's prettifying of The Natural seem positively dour by contrast. Maybe it's just the season. [7 Apr 1989, p.1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Better Off Dead has the body of a tired teen comedy but the soul of an inspired student film; it's the first movie in a long time to interrupt itself periodically with flights of animated fancy. At one point, romantic foreshadowing is accomplished by a "clay-mation" sequence featuring cheeseburgers in love. At another, a lovesick teen draws a cartoon picture of his faithless girlfriend, and the drawing tells him to get lost. [17 Oct 1985, p.B6]
    • Miami Herald
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Platoon lacks the sweep, the heroic (and anti-heroic) vision of Apocalypse Now, and it lacks that film's signal strength, which was its evocation of the visceral appeal, the sheer romance of war, at least to those not fighting it. Some of Coppola's images in Apocalypse Now were among the most beautiful in contemporary film. Platoon is merely terrifying. [16 Jan 1987, p.6]
    • Miami Herald
    • 97 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    The direction, by Jim Sheridan, is tough-edged. [27 Oct 1989, p.G7]
    • Miami Herald
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    It's fluffy stuff, lovingly made and instantly forgettable. [20 May 1988, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Octopussy is not very good. Though there's a good car- and-train chase scene and the usual schedule of narrow escapes, this one has fewer adventure sequences and less drama even than the last half-dozen. There are more gimmicks. [10 June 1983, p.12]
    • Miami Herald

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