For 384 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill Cosford's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Broadway Danny Rose
Lowest review score: 0 Halloween III: Season of the Witch
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 84 out of 384
384 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Bill Cosford
    Raising Arizona is the best comedy about kidnapping ever made. Small category, admittedly. This is a film that gets a laugh -- legitimate, unqualified, not a sick laugh at all -- out of a running gag in which a baby is left in the middle of an Arizona highway by thugs on the lam. Cars bear down, a "biker from Hell" attacks. How many filmmakers could get away with baby-in-jeopardy jokes? [10 Apr 1987, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    Once you get past the initial hurdles, Iron Eagle has the kind of sappy charm and a variety of overblown performance that shapes kids' movies. It is not plausible for a second, but neither, on the face of it, was Bambi. [22 Feb 1986, p.C7]
    • Miami Herald
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    I guess Perfect is a movie about aerobics, journalism, ethics and love and a couple of hunks. It is even more stupid than it sounds. It is the stupidest thing I have seen this year, in or out of the movies. [7 June 1985, p.C9]
    • Miami Herald
    • 40 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    It's not nearly as good as you figure it will be, but it is a full-bore, flat-out fantasy, and outside of the Disney animated jungle, we don't find many of those anymore. [18 Dec 1992, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Scorsese and Zimmerman seem to be building on Andy Warhol's proclamations about the nature of celebrity. What they've added is the sourness of it and the pointlessness, and their King of Comedy, for a while darkly funny, winds up being terribly sad. It's the most unpleasant fine film in years. [20 Mar 1983, p.L1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    The director was Martha Coolidge (Valley Girl), about whom people have been using the word "potential" for a decade or so. Trapped inside Real Genius, there's a real director trying to get out. [7 Aug 1985, p.D5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    The World According to Garp is another of those films that fairly cries out for Robert Altman, who makes movies the way John Irving writes books. Altman doesn't seem to be making movies any more, so this is as close we're able to get to Garp, and it's not close enough. [23 July 1982, p.D10]
    • Miami Herald
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    Patty Hearst is a compelling piece of work, with the bogus immediacy of old newspaper clippings. And yet it plays at times almost as satire. It's a vaudevillian's account of the end of the '60s radicalism, a murderous skit. Schrader, who loves ambiguity, has outdone himself this time. [23 Sep 1988, p.E1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    The performances are standard brat-pack; you could rotate the casts of anything from Risky Business to About Last Night . . . into the picture and it would stay exactly the same. [6 Nov 1987, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    The original was good enough so that a residue of curiosity about the Freelings remains; we want to know what happened next. But a sequel is a sequel is a sequel, and this amiable movie is very much a II. [23 May 1986, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    It's a dreadful bore. [23 July 1993, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Watching Eastwood and Costner is a pleasure (even though they don't have much screen time together). In Costner's case, it's an unexpected one. Give him a role with weight, apparently, and he can carry the load. [24 Nov 1993, p.E1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Cosford
    Schrader, one of this country's most literate filmmakers, can be a show-off, and there are times in The Comfort of Strangers when we're more aware of style than story -- this piece is impeccably tailored, and it looks awfully good even when it isn't making sense. [17 May 1991, p.G11]
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Cosford
    Newell never gets the movie to soar as fairy tale, which is quite clearly what it means to be. And so this fantasy is at its best when it's down and dirty. And that's odd. [17 Sep 1993, p.G4]
    • Miami Herald
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    As is usual for this durable genre, victim and villain are well matched. Though House on Sorority Row does not have a single screeching-cat red herring, and though power tools are not employed, it does have a classic of low camp, a scene in which a girl who has just been nearly brained by a falling corpse repairs immediately and alone to her bedroom, where she changes into a baby-doll nightie and stands with her back to an open window. [23 Feb 1983, p.B4]
    • Miami Herald
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Cosford
    At its heart, however, Soul Man is a one-gag story propelled by sitcom material; there are times you'd swear you were watching Lucy. And because the filmmakers really aren't up to their premise, the movie ends on a note of forced harmony that's enough to make the blood run cold. It's a reminder that even good white liberals still aren't sure how to act around black people. Which, come to think of it, would make a fine, socially "relevant" comedy. Perhaps Hollywood will make it someday. [27 Oct 1986, p.C4]
    • Miami Herald
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    It is a masterpiece of design. The animated backgrounds are voluptuously illustrated, and the action often proceeds at dizzying speed, while an elaborate fabric of subtle visual cues steer the narrative. [25 Nov 1992, p.E1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Imagine for a moment Lord of the Rings peformed by puppets and hydraulically operated monsters against a background of realistic fantasy, and you have an idea of The Dark Crystal. It's the kind of film that children may take for granted, but that adults are transfixed by; there is much oohing and aahing in the seats. [20 Dec 1982, p.B8]
    • Miami Herald
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    Lester's film is so clearly about getting even rather than about troubled youth or any other societal problem that it seems, like Death Wish II and a hundred others, a waste of that energy. [16 Nov 1982, p.B4]
    • Miami Herald
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    The key to the movie's success is that it was made by people who know and doubtless even enjoy rock in all its infinite, often tedious variety. This distinguishes Spinal Tap from the usual run of spoof, created at a distance by bemused outsiders (Johnny Carson in a mop-top wig, etc.). Reiner and company actually understand the media they are lampooning; the result is not only funny, but lethal. [27 Apr 1984, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    It's not very good, but there are redeeming features. [24 Apr 1987, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Cosford
    Barfly is a perfectly incorrigible comedy, a movie of unusual shape and unpredictable moves. [25 Nov 1987, p.D9]
    • Miami Herald
    • 61 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    First Blood is no more than a man-bites-town retread, in which Vietnam and its aftermath are merely the angle. [27 Oct 1982, p.B6]
    • Miami Herald
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    Unfortunately, The Corsican Brothers isn't very funny. This does not exactly make us nostalgic for other, less purposeful C- and-C films, but it does serve as a sad reminder that their first, Up in Smoke, for all its excesses, was funnier than anything they have been able to manage since. [30 July 1984, p.C5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 20 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    Routine chop-sock of the non-Hong Kong school. [04 Sep 1985, p.D5]
    • Miami Herald
    • 18 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    The jokes? Passing gas, large breasts, schoolyard double entendre -- the usual run of recess humor. On the faces of most of the cast, one can clearly read despair, occasionally even irritation. They know: If you're much over 10, Police Academy 5 isn't going to keep you awake. [23 March 1988, p.C7]
    • Miami Herald
    • 26 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    Astoundingly, considering the fall of this film series from low aim to no aim at all, the original cast remains aboard. [8 Apr 1987, p.D8]
    • Miami Herald
    • 16 Metascore
    • 25 Bill Cosford
    The setting is no longer a summer camp, but a woodsy "confinement center" for the young and deranged; it's the kind of place in which, when a slow-witted inmate begins to taunt the guy chopping wood, one is impelled, with justification, to cover one's eyes. [3 Apr 1985, p.D7]
    • Miami Herald
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    Parker is flashy and gory and fun as usual. If only there were more to the thing. Then Angel Heart might not seem so dumb. [06 Mar 1987, p.D1]
    • Miami Herald
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Cosford
    Penn and Oldman booze and brawl and fight a losing battle. Their worst enemy, alas, is their director's self-indulgence. [05 Oct 1990, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald

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