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For 493 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Brian Lowry's Scores

Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Last Dance: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Life of Kylie: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 493
493 tv reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 65 Brian Lowry
    A fun if not particularly distinctive "The Clone Wars" extension. Built around a small band of renegade clones, the "Rebels"-like feel doesn't break the mold, even if its characters did.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Lowry
    Despite some highlights, this foray into “The Twilight Zone” territory mostly lacks the requisite punch Showtime’s “Masters of Horror” delivered, primarily owing to episodes with inadequate payoffs. Limited series should spur curiosity among King acolytes, but too few of the installments really pop creatively.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Lowry
    The Mosquito Coast comes together as the product of several puzzling choices, beginning with the decision to again adapt Paul Theroux's 1981 book, and then to situate it in a contemporary setting. The result is a creepier-than-perhaps-even-intended series, which most charitably plays a poor man's "Breaking Bad: Family Edition."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    It's possible to continue to admire the show's high-quality pieces and still think that end should come sooner rather than later.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Brian Lowry
    Add Shadow and Bone to the long list of efforts to establish new fantasy series in the post-"Game of Thrones" era, in this case with a fairly generic tale of a war-riven world and a young woman who learns she has spectacular powers and an epic destiny. As constructed it makes for a moderately watchable binge once you've committed, but no great loss if you don't.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Occasionally, the right show comes along in the wrong venue, which in TV terms can become its own cruel twist of fate. For now, though, the four previewed episodes continue to deliver unexpected turns and crumbs of information, planting the hook deep enough to sustain curiosity about where all this is heading, with the disclaimer that the aforementioned dramas ran out of creative gas pretty quickly...As pass-the-popcorn diversions go, that's about as solid an endorsement -- given misgivings about the subject matter -- as "Cruel Summer" could hope to elicit.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Lowry
    Small towns harbor big secrets in prestige TV, and so it is in Mare of Easttown, a showcase for Kate Winslet that resembles "Broadchurch" in the broad strokes, before establishing its own distinct personality. Slow to start, the limited series gains momentum while mostly providing Winslet a fine star vehicle a decade after her Emmy-winning turn in HBO's "Mildred Pierce."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Lowry
    This peculiar project — at times spooky but, at least initially, never remotely scary — is going to have to get significantly better fast to put any kind of a dent in “Law & Order” and make Mouse House execs feel sanguine about its Nielsen life signs.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Lowry
    It's pretty much everything the exclamation point would suggest -- a star-driven exercise that's loud but not very good.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 55 Brian Lowry
    Setting aside the backstage drama involving series creator Joss Whedon, The Nevers begins with an intriguing premise and develops it in such a plodding way that interest progressively fades with each successive hour. The idea of an X-Men-like group in turn-of-the-19th-century London surely has potential, but The Nevers needs to get better, sooner rather than later.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Lowry
    Comparisons are inevitable to Peele's films and HBO's "Lovecraft Country," but this 10-part Amazon anthology series proves provocative and bingeable while taking some questionable detours en route to its ultimate destination.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Lowry
    An uninspired series whose action and key narrative device owe at least as much to "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" as its half-century-old namesake.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    In the broad strokes "The Serpent" resembles any number of true-crime tales, but by meeting those criteria, this limited series still manages to get under your skin.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Lowry
    Might not qualify as Hemingway-esque brevity, but proves fascinating nevertheless.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Lowry
    Streaming services engage in all kinds of stunts in order to gain attention, and there's no denying that this amounts to a bit of a gimmick. Even so, for the couple of hours in our time that it takes to watch/listen to the chapters, "Calls" is an invitation worth answering.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Lowry
    "Al" has the feel of an idea that sounded better during the pitch than in the execution, with the laughs ending up lost in translation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Granted, the particular concept and setup might not be designed to last for very long before running out of steam; still, if it's not quite love at first sight, thanks primarily to Milioti, there's plenty here to like.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    There have been so many variations on Sherlock Holmes that the idea of another -- especially built around teenagers -- didn't provoke much enthusiasm going in. But The Irregulars proves unexpectedly fun, in what amounts to a Victorian version of "The X-Files," revising the most familiar characters while introducing a major dose of the supernatural to Baker Street.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Clearly, The Mighty Ducks: Game Changers wasn't eager to change much of anything about a proven and familiar formula. Yet in terms of crafting an entertaining, cheerfully lightweight show around this latest quack attack, the producers have largely achieved their goal.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Amazon already has a searing satire about out-of-control superheroes, "The Boys," which has quickly become its signature series. "Invincible," an animated show with basically the same broad outline, thus feels a tad redundant, though the opening episodes, produced very much for adults, yield some of the same visceral thrills.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Lowry
    Deriving its episodic subtitles from Franklin songs, "Genius: Aretha" is a testament to that hard work. And like the best musical biographies, it enhances an appreciation of Franklin's life and career, with an ease and grace that makes it look easy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Q: Into the Storm bears a resemblance to an earlier HBO docuseries, "The Jinx," unfolding like a mystery, as the filmmaker plays mental chess with his subjects. What gives this six-part effort particular heft is the role QAnon has come to play in US politics, becoming, as director Cullen Hoback puts it, "part interactive game, part religion, part political movement."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Lowry
    "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier" feels more conventional based strictly on its muscular premiere, while offering a welcome showcase for Anthony Mackie and Sebastian Stan.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 55 Brian Lowry
    The One takes an enticing idea --what would happen if everyone could be romantically paired with their perfect match by DNA? -- and squanders that by turning it into a mundane mystery. It's not bad, as Netflix's British binges go, but nor does the eight-episode run foster much of a love connection.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Superman & Lois was plucked from the ribs of the current crop of the CW's DC superhero dramas, but its strongest connection is to an earlier series, the long-running "Smallville." Adding a family/coming-of-age component to the Man of Steel's mythology, the show cleverly ties into the deep roots of the franchise, at least initially proving you can go home again.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Lowry
    The less you know about Behind Her Eyes going in the better, and while the Netflix drama feels slow-going at first, patience has its rewards. By the time it's over, this sci-fi-tinged limited series becomes a buzzworthy binge, one that will likely have you thinking back to clues you might have missed along the way.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Lowry
    Amend is a significant undertaking in its scope, and the roster of celebrity talent assembled is impressive and eclectic. The one misstep lies in Smith's folksy transitions, which seem tailored to a school-age audience. Granted, it would be great if kids watched this, but the "Schoolhouse Rock" tone he adopts feels out of step with the other voices telling this story.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Lowry
    Extensive access to the Farrows makes this an intimate look at that history, while renewing questions about separating art from the artist and Hollywood's embrace of problematic figures.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Lowry
    "Kenan" stays rooted in the here and now, showing a more vulnerable side of its star, but surrounding him with pretty stale sitcom trappings.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Lowry
    To call this a vanity project would be an understatement, but Johnson's inherent likability goes a long way, and he spells out that this isn't going to be all happy nostalgia, citing missteps that he learned from along the way.

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