Brian Tallerico

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For 591 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Brian Tallerico's Scores

Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Leftovers: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 LA to Vegas: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 66 out of 591
591 tv reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Burd and his team here haven’t made Dave more likable—in fact, the opposite may be true—but he’s increasingly surrounded by people who call him on his shit, which makes for sharper humor that feels like it’s taking risks with more confidence, even as Lil Dicky himself lacks exactly that. ... "Dave" is not quite as ambitious as “Atlanta” and often resorts to physical humor or juvenile jokes, but the start of the second season actually made me wonder if it could eventually be.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Brian Tallerico
    Valerie Armstrong’s smart show imagines one of those wives breaking free of the sitcom structure in a show that’s half-sitcom and half something much darker. In the first four episodes, some of the momenta sent to press drag after a fantastic first episode, but this is never a boring show, and it’s often incredibly clever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Tallerico
    The performances are strong throughout—Anozie is particularly remarkable—but it’s the consistently inventive writing and robust filmmaking that makes the project stand out. It’s heartfelt and fantastical at the same time.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    “Panic” is too thick with soap operatic twists that derail the honest emotion that could have emerged from this concept, one that merges typical teen rebellion and ambition with something new. Every time it pivots back to straightforward YA drama, especially in the truly poor scenes with Heather’s mom, “Panic” succumbs to mediocracy. And yet there are elements in the cast and high concept that keep it watchable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    It’s an event that’s most interesting when it’s the least forced, when these six actors who really grew up together in the public eye are allowed to wander the rebuilt sets of their apartments, asking each other what they remember from that formative chapter in their lives. Less effective are the superficial questions from host James Corden, or bits in which the cast table read memorable scenes from the history of the series (although, man, Kudrow still gives it her all.)
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Brian Tallerico
    Every idea here feels superficially confronted. Nothing feels like insight, only constant melodrama that barely connects to modern or future concerns. Other than the occasional acting choice (by Beharie or Aduba, particularly), everything here is predictable, bland, and unrealistic. And so “Solos” verges from just misguided into insulting, pushing buttons in the most uninteresting way to get a response—it takes a special kind of nerve to use dying parents to provoke an emotional response in the first two episodes of an anthology series.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    It’s sometimes too languorous for its own good, especially in its midsection, but it builds to a powerful pair of final episodes that really elevate Ackie, who gives a phenomenal performance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    It has a consistent cleverness that makes its flaws easy to overlook, especially when the lines are delivered by such talented voice actors. It's just a fun world to hang out in with talented comedians in every scene.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Brian Tallerico
    Aduba really fights it, but the dialogue in the fourth session feels melodramatic more often than it does genuine, and that’s a shame given how often this show felt true and pure in its original incarnation. ... The man who often pushes through that melodrama is Ramos, star of this summer’s “In the Heights” and a young actor on the verge of superstardom. He finds honesty in the fast-talking Eladio that makes his sessions the easy highlight of the four episodes each week.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    It is harrowing, beautiful, moving, terrifying, and somehow both deeply genuine and poetic at the same time.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    Unlike a lot of recent crime docuseries, “Fall River” never drags because Day keeps the pace humming through the various different theories about these cases. ... But then “Fall River” was derailed by COVID. Jailhouse interviews with people like Drew and Murphy were put on hold and the project lost some of its thrust.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    So much of the eight episodes in the first season are dedicated to telling parallel origin stories that it can sometimes get weighed down with the burden of that structure, but there are interesting themes weaved through this adaptation of the comic series of the same name by Mark Millar ("Wanted," "Kick-Ass") and Frank Quitely.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 37 Brian Tallerico
    The most frustrating thing about “Sons of Sam” is that the real story of what happened to Maury Terry is constantly overshadowed by the sensational “What If” presentation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    “The Bad Batch” is an animated series that seems unlikely to make the same kind of waves as the hit that gave the world Baby Yoda/Grogu, but should satisfy the hardcore fans.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    This year’s story may be its most ambitious, even if it sometimes succumbs to overwriting and pretentious filmmaking choices in early episodes just before building up steam at the point Starz decided to stop sending episodes (so I can’t say how successfully it connects its many ideas). Having said that, it’s never boring, even if I’m not sure yet if I buy all of what it’s selling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    It’s a talented enough ensemble that the “let’s see what happens” feel of some of the writing and plotting still makes for enjoyable comedy, but it also feels like a show that’s just a step away from greatness, and so it can be frustrating to feel like it’s falling slightly short of its potential. Hopefully, a less infectious third season could find that focus.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 42 Brian Tallerico
    After a reasonably strong start, “Shadow and Bone” gets weighed down by so many Netflix Original fantasy show clichés that it sinks into the Fold itself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Brian Tallerico
    “The Mosquito Coast” is stronger in its unpredictable plotting than its dialogue, and its momentum is remarkable. ... It feels like fans of the work of Vince Gilligan, and “Ozark” will take to this the most, although “The Mosquito Coast” is arguably stronger in its first season than that Netflix drama was in its freshman outing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Brian Tallerico
    The series has a surprising, disappointing tabloid-like style at times, as when Little's words are tastelessly splashed over images of a graveyard like the one in which he killed a woman. It’s almost as if the filmmakers knew there was a very strong feature film-length version of this story they could have told, and they fell back on cheaper filmmaking techniques to spread that out over five hours of television.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    It’s the first true must-see drama of 2021, an excellent ensemble piece that works as character study, murder mystery, and actor’s showcase. Finely detailed in both setting and character, it’s a tapestry of a mini-series, a piece that centers one of our best living actors while also providing rich, complex characters for an extended ensemble of fantastic performers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Brian Tallerico
    Smart and stylish. ... The mid-section of the season drags a bit when it feels like “Spy City” has a few too many characters and subplots around episode three, but it recovers nicely about halfway through Episode 4 and then barrels through to an ending that answers most of the questions of the season while finding an elegiac note to hit at the same time.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Brian Tallerico
    The second episode settles into itself and moves away some of the premiere's more egregious flaws, but it’s still a misfire, more content with being atrociously manipulative than using its characters and concept in a manner that feels remotely genuine or nuanced. Subtlety may not be the hallmark of Thursday night dramas, but there’s still a breaking point and “Rebel” hits it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    As is, "This is a Robbery" alternates between superficially digging into major issues like the impact of the mob around the world (it skims through the IRA, for example, and its connection to the Boston mob in a matter of minutes) and repetitively repeating details of the crime itself. It’s interesting because the case and its many players are interesting, but it’s poorly made.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    At the end of this run sent for press, it feels like it’s finally finding its voice, ironing out some of the early tonal imbalance and allowing its most interesting characters to shine, some thanks to a few very unexpected plot turns in episodes three and four.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    Over six hours, Burns, Novick, and regular writer Geoffrey C. Ward (a winner of five Emmys for Burns projects) don’t just offer a chronological biography of Hemingway, they dig into his strengths and weaknesses as a writer and human being. They are unafraid of tackling his abusive side and claims of misogyny and racism, resulting in as three-dimensional a portrait of a twentieth century icon as I’ve seen in a very long time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Tallerico
    After four episodes, “Made for Love” is more “interesting” than “entertaining,” and I kept wishing it was more of the latter given its premise and ensemble.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    Part of the problem is the direction here too often feels flat and shapeless, bouncing characters around a costume drama in which they don’t always look comfortable or genuine. The show is most effective when it gets the gang together and drops them in an atmospheric setting and case.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Brian Tallerico
    While the misanthropy can be a little overwhelming at times and the balance between the Korvo/Terry plots and the wall feels off at times in both years, there’s an ambitious unpredictability to the writing on “Solar Opposites” that elevates it in every episode.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    If you’re thinking that six hours of conspiracy theories about basements of pizza joints filled with dead children might be a bit much, Hoback’s work is smarter than that. He really digs into the people around the Q phenomenon, focusing a lot of time on the 8chan admins. ... Some early episodes zip past these events a bit too easily, although later ones take the emergence of violence from the QAnon world more seriously.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    There’s a chance that “Invincible” could get lost in the shadow of two massive super-titans like that headline-grabbing pair ["Zack Snyder’s Justice League" and "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier"]. The truth is that it’s in many ways the most inventive and interesting of the three projects, something that truly seeks to use the many clichés of the superhero genre in a fresh new way.

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