Brian Tallerico

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For 701 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Brian Tallerico's Scores

Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck
Lowest review score: 0 LA to Vegas: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 78 out of 701
701 tv reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 58 Brian Tallerico
    If it all sounds like “Westworld” is still ridiculously narratively divided and convoluted, it undeniably is, and the show continues to have a frustrating habit of over-writing itself into ridiculously long passages of exposition. ... But it’s encouraging to see actors like Harris, Wright, and Paul have more fun than they were in the drag of a third season.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    Season 2 checks almost all of the same boxes as Season 1, and that makes it feel almost comfortable in an increasingly uncomfortable world.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    Excellent. ... This is one of the smartest programs on TV, a show that’s constantly surprising viewers in a way that's like nothing else on the air right now.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Tallerico
    Assayas has tackled art vs. commerce before, but never with such charm and casual brilliance. Instead of mocking the industry he loves, he’s made a project that highlights the difficulty of a project like “Irma Vep” that almost celebrates its own existence. Yes, making a TV series is hard, but “Irma Vep” is proof that it’s worth the effort.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Brian Tallerico
    “The Boys” is consistently entertaining, but it could be so much stronger. For the first time, it almost seems scared to really unleash its true power.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    The two-part premiere of “Obi-Wan Kenobi” struggles more than any other property to date to develop its own personality outside of the two famous trilogies it seeks to connect (and even a hit Disney+ Star Wars show in its protector/child dynamic).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Brian Tallerico
    Make the journey worth it, and fans will forgive the bumpy ride to get there. For now, despite the return of “Blockbuster Television,” most of those questions about this show’s place in the entertainment world in the 2020s remain unanswered.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 42 Brian Tallerico
    Hyperactive filmmaking with non-stop edits and showy angles only calls attention to itself and away from the subject. The Pistols themselves get lost in all the chaotic artistic decisions and the show becomes more about the image of the band than the people, the message, or even the music.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Brian Tallerico
    Specials about comedy talents are often just excuses to watch the best bits of a famous star, but “George Carlin’s American Dream” is way more than that. It is loving and appreciative of his genius without ever devolving into fan service.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    Every time that “Night Sky” threatens to drift off into something disposable, Simmons and Spacek shine, reminding everyone that they’re true stars.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Brian Tallerico
    It’s interesting to see Lucy Boynton given a role that didn’t really exist in a source material that wasn’t exactly good to female characters, but the lack of urgency sometimes feels like it’s working against everyone involved, sometimes stuck between replicating the style of the ‘60s and appealing to an audience in the 2020s.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Tallerico
    It’s good for a show like “Hacks” to be silly every now and then, but those [sitcomish] moments stand out this season more against a backdrop that takes the show’s ideas more seriously. Still, “Hacks” overcomes these set-ups to remain a remarkably smart comedy, one that understands human behavior and how it’s warped by show business.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Not all of the sketches work—there’s no show where they all work—but the batting average is still so much higher than most programs that the Kids inspired into existence. ... They’re still hilarious, smart, and sometimes brutal. It makes me very happy to say the Kids are still more than alright.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    A very watchable, hyper-paced eight-episode second season. Some of the magic has been diffused, however, largely because the show basically doubles its cast, feeling like it’s just getting more crowded instead of developing on the foundation of the first year. There’s still enough to like here, but the parallels to “Lost” are strangely more prominent than ever.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    Every time “The Pentaverate” feels like it's developing a rhythm, it goes on a tangent to fill space—typically one that shows off the fact that this show is allowed to be very R-rated on Netflix. It’s like a stand-up set that has some good material surrounded by 45 minutes of filler.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Brian Tallerico
    Sparked by a jittery live-wire performance from Jon Bernthal and anchored by incredibly smart dialogue, “We Own This City” is a stand-out mini-series in one of the most crowded periods of “Prestige Drama” in years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Brian Tallerico
    This story really has it all, and Campos clearly gets all of it. His obsession with the case pays off as he turns it into high drama, and high art.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Brian Tallerico
    The show gets stronger when one disconnects from the mystery aspect of the set-up to see the bigger picture. Even if parts of that picture are fuzzy while others are over-developed, it’s an admirably ambitious effort from everyone involved.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    Yes, there are parts of They Call Me Magic, especially in the first half, that are a little manufactured to continue a love affair that basketball fans have been having for four decades now, but those shallow segments are overwhelmed by ones that are richly true and vulnerable. Magic was a leader on the court. Earvin has been one everywhere else.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    While this version of “The Man Who Fell to Earth” escapes the shadow of the original thanks to its incredible cast, the question remains how long it can keep going before it stumbles.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    The third season take a little while to build momentum but that’s intentional. These characters are lost emotionally and disconnected physically for a few episodes, trying to figure out for themselves what the next chapter looks like. It makes sense that the storytelling drifts a bit, but it really locks in around episode 4 and the next two are among the best in the history of the series. ... It’s also just still so funny and smart.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    It’s too content to tell us mostly what we already know about three of the most well-known first ladies in history—a better version would have tried to bring some less-recounted stories to life—even if the consistently strong performances keep it watchable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Brian Tallerico
    The truth is that this one feels phoned in, like a contract that Kelley signed and then never really bothered to put in the work to flesh out these characters beyond the checklist of salacious plot twists from the source material. The true scandal is how lazy it all feels.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Brian Tallerico
    After a narratively rocky start held together largely through Michael Mann’s undeniable craftsmanship, the show slowly comes into its own over the next few episodes, becoming richer and more interesting with each one. It’s a program that will demand patience, but that increasingly feels like it will be worth the effort.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    The moral complexity in “Better Call Saul” has long been one of its greatest strengths, and, after these two episodes, it certainly doesn’t feel like the show is going to eschew that for simple resolutions as it gets to the finish line.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    A show like this needs to find the right rhythm, a balance between character and espionage plotting, and it’s almost dead perfect here, at least when the show focuses on the Slow Horses—long scenes with the kidnappers, especially in later episodes, feel like they could have been shortened a bit, to be fair. It helps to have a cast who completely understood the assignment.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    A choppy show through its first four episodes that's still a must-see simply for what Oscar Isaac does in a fascinating dual performance. ... The screenwriting issues with “Moon Knight” never fully derail it because the talents of people like Isaac, Hawke, and Benson/Moorhead keep pulling it back on track. ... More than any other Disney+ Marvel show, I’m excited to see how this series ends and where the character goes from here.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Brian Tallerico
    “DMZ” feels both too short and too long. It’s too short to build out the world that was needed to make it work and too long to spin its wheels with clunky dialogue about the dynamics between Alma and everyone she encounters for four hours.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Brian Tallerico
    Smith carefully chooses his interview subjects in a way that’s sympathetic to Melngailis. ... He smartly avoids sensational techniques, letting the people involved tell their stories in a way that's more tragic than tabloid.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    Is “Welcome to Flatch” mocking people who live in small towns or embracing their idiosyncrasies? After screening five episodes, I’m afraid that the answer feels too often like the former, and that this is a show made by people who have never lived anywhere near a heartland town like Flatch and probably wouldn’t visit there if you paid them.

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