Candice Frederick

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For 48 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Candice Frederick's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Tell Me Who I Am
Lowest review score: 30 The Intruder
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 48
  2. Negative: 1 out of 48
48 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Candice Frederick
    Blue Story doesn’t reinvent the wheel when it comes to films about turf wars, but its personal, humanizing themes about friendship, love, youth, and black masculinity keeps you riveted, Onwubolu’s lyrical respites aside.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Candice Frederick
    Fanning and Bardem deliver two utterly devastating performances that show the power of despair met with unyielding love.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    There are really two contending films inside Swallow that, if given the opportunity and the space to do so, could have been fascinating as separate entities.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Candice Frederick
    Lost in America isn’t exactly a cinematic masterpiece, and sometimes its prosaic filmmaking does it no favors, but the film’s ability to move the conversation forward merits attention.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Candice Frederick
    Premature captures that unexpected, earth-shattering moment in life when you realize adulthood, real adulthood, is not so simple and cute. It’s difficult, it’s scary, and it’s heartbreaking at times. That’s what Howard’s beautiful performance conveys.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    Come As You Are is best when it’s not trying so hard to be the next great sex comedy and actually focuses on building the relationships among the male friends and their own existential crises, which gives the film so much pathos as it explores their vulnerabilities and frustrations.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Candice Frederick
    Though it’s an intoxicating blend of modern and vintage romance, The Photograph, while flawed, is most intriguing when it peels back the layers between a mother and daughter who never really knew each other in life, but whose stories eventually intertwine in ways they could have never imagined.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Candice Frederick
    It does what so little of the dialogue has managed to do: implore audiences to embrace black female survivors and to understand the cultural and painful dilemmas they continue to endure along their avid fight to heal the wounds of the entire black race. Though it’s at times a gutting watch, it’s ultimately about hope and sisterhood.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Candice Frederick
    It’s understandable that The 40-Year-Old Version is intentionally scattered, because it is about a woman grasping at straws in order to find her place in this very rigid space, both professionally and personally. But the film lacks the finesse to tell that story more cinematically, even running way longer than it should, as it roams towards a satisfying conclusion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Candice Frederick
    While the filmmaker rightly understands that shock value isn’t the only way to tell a visceral story, its central performance by Julia Garner is what makes the film most interesting to watch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Candice Frederick
    At its core, The Last Full Measure is a poignant reevaluation of gallantry and of how survivor’s guilt impacts those veterans whose lives were spared. It’s not without its flaws, and Robinson’s wobbly narrative bears much of the blame, but its emotional resonance will stay with you long afterward.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Candice Frederick
    Like a Boss is vibrant and sometimes funny, but rarely heartfelt and entirely stale. While it hits a few sentimental notes, the film’s failure to delve into the friendship it celebrates, or to say anything significant about women’s relationships in business, ultimately hampers it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    Clemency is a film that is just almost great. The level of restraint Chukwu has in her writing and execution, while admirable, is the very thing that prevents it from truly soaring.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    Perhaps if 21 Bridges just settled on being a mildly entertaining single-night cop thriller, it could have gotten by on its well-shot action scenes and A-list cast. But once it introduces concepts it’s unable to fulfill, it becomes a massive disappointment.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Candice Frederick
    Waves isn’t an easy film to digest, and it’s not without its flaws — Emily’s narrative at the end makes it a bit disjointed, and Tyler’s story never feels resolved — but it stays with you mostly because of its shattering performances that bolster Shults’ story.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    Though it’s bolstered primarily by the charisma of Bale and Damon’s performances, the soulless yet thrilling Ford v Ferrari doesn’t provide much more than huffy banter, corporate rivalry, and an adrenaline rush. The real-life characters deserve more than that.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Candice Frederick
    Norton earns praise for taking on the gargantuan task of bringing this story to the screen, and pulling quadruple duty as actor-director-writer-producer, but Motherless Brooklyn seems more like a blueprint of a great film that lacks the nuance it needs to be truly impactful.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    Youmans ultimately grapples with several tough themes that center the black Baptist South in a way that is rarely seen on screen. Even so, the inept editing and screenplay ultimately bring down Burning Cane.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Candice Frederick
    #Female Pleasure smoothly glides from one country segment to another and engages audiences with the personal stories of the five women, told through voiceover and solo interviews, as well as a broader look at the cultures in which they live.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Candice Frederick
    Marked by evolving degrees of miraculous vivacity, dread, despair, and ultimately hope, Tell Me Who I Am reflects a fraternal relationship equally encumbered by truth and lies but strengthened by love and an unflinching revelation in real time. It is utterly staggering.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Candice Frederick
    It’s absolutely grating to watch. Even worse, there’s not one humorous moment throughout its nearly 90-minute runtime.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Candice Frederick
    Lucy in the Sky becomes a strange experience that tries to force too many themes together at the detriment of its otherwise fascinating heroine.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    The gendered themes at play here do little to boost the quality of Buck and Schlingmann’s storytelling, which is too tangled to follow at times.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    Black and Blue is chock-full of heart-pounding car chases and suspenseful moments that are certain to entertain mainstream audiences, but the film falters when it attempts, beyond its tittle to reflect a necessary and under-discussed conversation about societal issues.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 65 Candice Frederick
    When these artists get to the point where they are completely unconstrained, it conveys a freedom and strength that surprises not only the audience but the performers as well.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Candice Frederick
    A remarkably stylish and fascinating space drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Candice Frederick
    It’s the most unproductive type of sociopolitical film, especially in today’s climate, in that it aims to incite but not to motivate.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 55 Candice Frederick
    This Changes Everything may not actually change anything (especially considering that it, too, is directed by a man), but there’s hope that it will at least galvanize more allies, so that there will be more of them in Hollywood than not. That’s a start.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 45 Candice Frederick
    Perhaps the worst thing a film can be, even more so than the binary of good or bad, is forgettable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 65 Candice Frederick
    You’ve got to appreciate a movie that doesn’t take itself seriously. And, man, Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw is definitely about as ridiculous as a movie can be, for better or worse.

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