Christopher Schobert

Select another critic »
For 51 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Christopher Schobert's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 12 Years a Slave
Lowest review score: 0 The Bag Man
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 34 out of 51
  2. Negative: 7 out of 51
51 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Onward is a spring treat that might not lead to sequels or boffo merchandise sales, but will certainly please families and the Pixar faithful. Debating whether the film is “classic Pixar” is silly. Put those concerns aside and you’ll be rewarded with the first great family film of 2020.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Saint Frances is a character-driven effort that tackles big themes in a wonderfully down-to-earth manner. That’s a tricky balancing act, but Thompson and O’Sullivan pull it off.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Cleverly constructed and bursting with well-planned action sequences–the carnival brawl near the film’s end is positively delightful–Birds of Prey is the rare comic book adaptation directed with a real, tangible vision. And as Quinn, it’s hard to imagine anyone else than Robbie bringing her mix of middle-finger savagery, surprising vulnerability, and utter likability to the role.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Red Penguins is utterly stuffed with memorable stories and unforgettable people. Therefore, the film is unquestionably entertaining for hockey fans. However, it has no more gravitas than, say, any random ESPN Films “30 for 30” entry.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Schobert
    Seberg never quite makes the case for its own existence, nor does it demonstrate to the audience why its protagonist’s political beliefs were so revolutionary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Schobert
    The film is an emotional knockout that will leave even the most stoic viewer on the verge of weeping, but the shifts of the film’s second half are ultimately uplifting. Waves is a tremendous film, one that finishes with an appropriately transcendent final shot.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Christopher Schobert
    Ford v Ferrari is an easy film to scoff at; there is nothing new here, and there is no debating that fact. Instead, we have a compelling story told in simple, intelligent fashion. It deserves a spot on the list of great racing dramas, and the list of the year’s most entertaining dramas.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Christopher Schobert
    This is a standard unsolved mystery drama, the type that would be quite at home on a small-screen police procedural. The setting certainly adds to its interest, but even when the boy’s fate is (seemingly) explained, it is difficult to care.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 83 Christopher Schobert
    As It Was is a tremendously entertaining, surprisingly moving film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    It is impossible to walk away from Just Mercy unmoved. ... Yet Destin Daniel Cretton’s third feature also feels a bit predictable, a bit obvious, and never quite as compelling as one might expect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Driven is a well-told, strongly-acted drama with real heart.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 42 Christopher Schobert
    Euphoria is undeniably a missed opportunity at creating a drama of frayed sisterhood that feels fresh and unique. The film is also too restrained and unambitious to make a grand statement on mortality.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Christopher Schobert
    In the rare moments when this just becomes a film about a woman who loves country music with every fiber of her being, it separates itself and becomes far more than just another story about a star being born.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Christopher Schobert
    The Quiet Man is as mysterious as its subject. It is, of course, an absolute must-watch for the Stones faithful. There is no great insight regarding the other members of the band, though.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 42 Christopher Schobert
    It falls flat. There are a variety of reasons — one-note characters, an overly-familiar story arc, a laughable sequence of bee heroism (!). (Alternate title idea: “Secrets and Hives.”) Still, there is the work of Grainger and Paquin.... They make Tell It to the Bees watchable, and are worthy of high praise.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Christopher Schobert
    The film itself is not a success, but the performance by Mara is complex and profound. If for no other reason, see it for her.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Christopher Schobert
    The Wedding Guest is as technically accomplished as any film Winterbottom has ever made. But it all amounts to very, very little.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Jeremiah is bouncy and pleasing, if overfamiliar and never as insightful as one would hope.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Christopher Schobert
    One of the film’s successes is its ability to subvert expectations.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Christopher Schobert
    Barry Jenkins has created a film both tender and tough, with a time, a place, and a story to lose oneself in. Sublime in its depiction of an emotional connection and subtle in its layers of systematic oppression, Beale Street is a major work from a filmmaker whose gifts are clearly boundless.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    Kidman gives one of her best performances, and Kusama keeps us interested even when we know what’s coming.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Christopher Schobert
    This is precision entertainment, a crackling, pulse-pounding heist movie with a sterling cast, a whip-smart script, and undeniable social resonance, calling to mind heavyweight champs like The French Connection and Heat. It never quite matches those cinema milestones, but make no mistake, Widows is a knockout.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Christopher Schobert
    We the Animals is most effective when it breaks free from conventional storytelling and relies on image, sound, emotion, and mood.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 58 Christopher Schobert
    The reason to see Siberia is, quite simply, the presence of Keanu Reeves.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Christopher Schobert
    Terminal is destined to be forgotten. However, if the cast, the look, and the wacky storyline intrigue, it might be worth a viewing. While it’s far from the so-bad-its-good category, the few oddities contained within may delight a few curious audience members.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 33 Christopher Schobert
    Basmati Blues is an inoffensive trifle. It does not warrant outrage; it’s not bold enough to risk it. Yet there is some heart, and undoubtedly, some ambition.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Christopher Schobert
    The film never loses its spirit of harmony, even during its lengthy railroad chase ending. Throughout, it is a marvel of humor, dazzling visuals, and unique characters.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Christopher Schobert
    Roman J. Israel, Esq. might not be the courtroom drama fans have been expecting. Instead, it’s a character study filled with insight and originality.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Christopher Schobert
    When Molly’s Game is good, it’s very, very good. There are dazzling moments throughout, and it’s clear that Sorkin is having a blast. Much of the film is downright intoxicating, just like the world Molly Bloom found herself in.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Christopher Schobert
    Lady Bird is one of the year’s great joys. Greta Gerwig’s debut as a solo writer-director is so wise, so funny, and so remarkably assured that it seems to have flown in out of nowhere.

Top Trailers