Clint Worthington

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For 124 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Clint Worthington's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Tesla
Lowest review score: 16 Remember
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 63 out of 124
  2. Negative: 13 out of 124
124 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Clint Worthington
    At two hours, it can drag, and the mid-budget nature of the thing can leave it feeling less than ambitious. But there’s just enough inventiveness here to make it stand out in a packed field, and to cement Prince-Bythewood as a director who can handle bloodshed as adeptly as character.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 42 Clint Worthington
    Fire Saga manages glimmers of fun through its laborious two-hour runtime when it sits the hell down and plays some fun Eurovision-y songs, but there are too many false notes in between to justify trucking through the tedium to find them. Just hit up the soundtrack when it comes out and bop along to some goofy songs.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 42 Clint Worthington
    If you’re looking for a lean-and-mean action picture where Chris Hemsworth absolutely bodies dozens of disposable henchmen, Extraction might fit the bill, at least for its first hour.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Clint Worthington
    To be sure, the concept of Spike Jonze directing a Beastie Boys documentary conjures up flashier results than this. But taking it for what it is, Beastie Boys Story remains an entertaining, insightful, and unexpectedly fun look back at three of hip-hop’s most iconic voices.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Clint Worthington
    Think of Timmy Failure like a food truck: the best ones do one or two things really well, and commit to just doing those things. With McCarthy et al., Timmy Failure‘s virtues are an expertly-delivered dry wit that works for kids and adults alike, and a series of adorable performances, from Fegley and the rest of the kids to the all-too-game adults.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Clint Worthington
    More than a metatextual look at the struggles of indie filmmakers to gnaw at their own emotional wounds, Black Bear is an astounding showcase for its leads, and way more than it says on the wrapper.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Clint Worthington
    Both here and in the real world, Tesla is more legend than man, and we can only ever really comprehend him through that warped lens. Almereyda understands this fundamental hurdle in the biopic formula, and leans into it with refreshing candor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Clint Worthington
    For its unconventional structure and occasional flights of fancy, The Glorias all too often reads as a bog-standard biopic more interested in recounting history than telling a story.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Clint Worthington
    Try as it might to blend the music-conscious idiosyncrasies of Portlandia with the varied persona of one of our weirdest, most valued artists, The Nowhere Inn ends up going, well, nowhere.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Clint Worthington
    The most important thing is that it’s funny and charming in all the right ways, a slight but sweet meditation on the viability of long-term relationships.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Clint Worthington
    Whether as an amped-up look into a great singer-songwriter’s musical process from page to stage, or a deeper dive into the psyche of America’s most frustratingly composed artist, Miss Americana feels insightful and hypnotic.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Clint Worthington
    The glory of Hittman’s film is in finding those moments of beauty among the brutal silences, and the magnetic grace that can be found in a person’s most difficult days.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Clint Worthington
    Zola‘s not without its faults. The script is a little too loosy-goosy for its own good, and the last 10-15 minutes are admittedly a lackluster resolution to the high-tension hijinks on display. But until that point, it’s downright thrilling to watch a film breeze through its grimly funny energy with such exuberant confidence, especially with such a new, vibrant voice in Paige.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Clint Worthington
    Whether a treatise on the complexities of family dynamics, or the transformative power of love, or a dollhouse exploration of weird, broken people flailing for meaning in an uncertain universe, Kajillionaire carries plenty of rewards for those who are willing to succumb to July’s particular set of skills.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Clint Worthington
    Whether you like Wendy will depend almost entirely on your continued tolerance for the baby-Malick stirrings of Zeitlin’s style: roving, evocative camerawork; the unpolished roughness of unknown child performers; treacly sentiment pouring from each horn blast of Romer’s score; or France’s storybook narration. At nearly two hours, that’s a lot of syrup to pour down your throat, and the unapologetic mawkishness of it all can rankle after a while, even if you’re attuned to the film’s wavelength.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Clint Worthington
    In turning Force Majeure from a sophisticated tale of broken masculinity into a thunderingly-obvious marital drama, Downhill unfortunately lives up to its title.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Clint Worthington
    It doesn’t always work, and the results are more than a little misanthropic (especially given the cruelty of its opening and closing moments). But if that’s your jam, and the prospect of body-swapping assassins coated in guts, gore, and neon appeals to you, Possessor‘s Argento-soaked atmosphere ought to fill that need.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Clint Worthington
    In something as herky-jerky and convoluted as The Gentlemen, the viewer has enough to worry about keeping the whole story straight without dreading the next tone-deaf thing to come out of an esteemed character actor’s mouth.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Clint Worthington
    It’s hard not to see the parallels between A Hidden Life‘s setting and the modern-day world in which it’s released. In an era where nationalism reigns high, and people’s loyalties are questioned when they refuse to defer to a leader they cannot support, its abstractions feel universal enough to graft onto the world stage of 2019.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 42 Clint Worthington
    The Next Level just feels like more of the same, and some of its bigger swings might just even border on the irresponsible. As kids’ fare goes, this series remains weird enough to not totally write it off. But for the next version, they might have to work out some of the bugs.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Clint Worthington
    This version of Lady and the Tramp actually lacks the thematic complexity of its ’50s inspiration.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Clint Worthington
    As legal dramas go, it’s quite good; as a Todd Haynes film, you struggle to see the talent for which he’s known.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Clint Worthington
    It’s handsomely made, and Erivo carries the film on her shoulders, but its movements are too clumsy to give Tubman the actualization she deserves.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Clint Worthington
    It’s great to see Arnie and Linda Hamilton in the saddle again, and Davis and Reyes are welcome additions to the cast, but it’s probably time to terminate this franchise for good, and be thankful they went out on this serviceable note.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Clint Worthington
    With a haunting Brad Pitt performance at the center of an existentially arresting personal journey, Ad Astra feels like the boldest, most considered major studio movie we’re going to get for a long time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Clint Worthington
    We get to see Lopez command the screen as easily as Ramona does the stage, offering up a seductive awards-worthy performance that makes us remember why she became a movie star in the first place.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Clint Worthington
    Angel Has Fallen is maybe the least objectionable of the Fallen series, but that’s not really saying much, is it?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Clint Worthington
    Not quite a domestic mystery, not quite a fascinating character study of a frustrated creative, Bernadette feels half-hearted in just about every respect.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Clint Worthington
    It’s the kind of new-macho action picture that wears its cornball heart on its sleeve — one where the misfit leads learning to work together is literally, mechanically, the way to defeat the bad guy. It may not have Dom and the gang, but Hobbs & Shaw is as self-indulgently silly and giddily earnest as its fellow Fast brethren.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Clint Worthington
    Wang, along with her stellar cast, manages to deftly weave droll, observational family comedy with deeply resonant examinations of the role of family and culture in our lives. It’s naturalistic without feeling downbeat, farcical without being goofy, and treats its cultural signposts with a sensitivity and honesty few filmmakers can achieve.

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