Courtney Howard

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For 53 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Courtney Howard's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 90 Sophie Jones
Lowest review score: 10 Polar
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 53
  2. Negative: 9 out of 53
53 movie reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Courtney Howard
    Though the high-concept relationship movie frequently trips over its own well-meaning sentiments, the sweet, earnest performances and sharp technical craftsmanship deliver a blissful feeling when the material comes up short.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Courtney Howard
    Containing razor-sharp witticisms about feminine intuition, gendered sexual politics and relationships (both platonic and romantic), it excels beyond its self-deprecating title.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Courtney Howard
    Overall, Roth crafts a resonant picture, purposefully threading in themes centered on identity and degradation with a sensitive, deft touch. Where it falters in properly contextualizing its pervading sentiments, it often finds resilient strength in the smart parallels between animal and human.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Courtney Howard
    Director Leandro Neri’s lighthearted romantic comedy delivers hijinks and a few sweet sentiments about having the courage to embrace destiny. Nevertheless, its broad comedy and thoughtful themes aren’t completely cogent, due to a lack of properly motivated character developments and questionable scenarios.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Courtney Howard
    Effervescent performances from an ebullient ensemble make Finding You a palatable and compelling female coming-of-age tale.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    This superior sequel serves as both a meta-commentary on his humbling past antics and a pivotal point for the eponymous protagonist. It’s an astute, entertaining, light-hearted mix of slapstick and self-reflexive humor commingling with enlightened, sharp sentiments about individualism and commercialism (the latter of which Potter herself wrestled with, and eventually pioneered).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    The soulful, comforting sentiments at the core of Basilone’s feature are really what ring true.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Courtney Howard
    The cinematic catharsis the Barrs and company have carefully crafted stands as a fully realized portrait of grief that’s universal in its texture. By focusing on living with the specter of grief and the discovery of its blessings, the filmmakers highlight the human struggle, breaking through to the gutting truth of the matter.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    The feature’s genteel, sweet spirit and radiant lead performances rescue it from forgettable mediocrity and genre familiarity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Courtney Howard
    While imperfect and at times predictable, the adventure these filmmakers and performers take us on feels like a warm tropical breeze.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    While more than an hour and a half seems like a long time to make the simplistic statement that the internet is bad, Balmès has greater profundity in mind when disseminating astute observations about how modern necessities and communicative devices impact cultures and ecosystems.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 80 Courtney Howard
    The warmth and touching tenderness of All My Life melts even the coldest of hearts in its quest to deliver happy and sad tears.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Courtney Howard
    Even though the kid is the hero we should clearly be rooting for, the filmmaker conjures equal amounts of empathy and compassion for the monster. That serves to add complexity to the characterizations, but balancing both sides muddles the poignancy of the climax.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Courtney Howard
    With lackluster character development, a few ill-conceived situations in the second half and dialogue that sounds like it’s been run through Google Translate, there’s only a modest amount of entertainment value found therein.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Courtney Howard
    Littered with confounding clichés and hokey devices, director/co-writer Andy Tennant’s feature is the exact inverse of what a passionate romance should aspire to be, let alone one preaching the power of positivity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Courtney Howard
    It delivers a few refreshing details by giving the heroine more agency in her quest to find happiness — yet not quite enough to justify its interminable run time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    The path to the inevitable but deeply moving conclusion is lively and thoroughly entertaining. Friedlander gets us there by throwing in unexpected yet true-to-life twists and turns that will likely be all too familiar to new parents, who typically don’t have the help of a second couple to share the responsibility.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    While it falls short of its promised earth-shattering, mind-altering revelations, it does cast an interesting hook from a creative perspective, thoughtfully packaging its message in visually coherent, engaging ways.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Courtney Howard
    This stirring documentary gives a comprehensive look at suicide through the lens of four at-risk segments of the population.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Courtney Howard
    Neither emotional enough to pay proper tribute to the true story it captures, nor hokey enough to qualify as “so bad, it’s good,” this is a flaccid, failed attempt at heart-tugging poignancy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Courtney Howard
    Even though the feature reflects WWE’s core values built on family, teamwork and inspirational aspirations, and contains healthy messages about proving one’s mettle using wit and wisdom, The Main Event sags far too frequently.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    Like any good, inspirational athletic adventure, the film forges a strong connection with the human side of the story.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Courtney Howard
    This documentary is not an infomercial for the Smith Ridge Veterinarian Center, but rather a wildly compassionate call to arms for a profession in need of advancement.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    While it suffers from a rocky beginning with burdensome amounts of kook and quirk, the unfolding spell it subtly casts holds profundity and wisdom.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Courtney Howard
    All The Bright Places would be nowhere without Haley’s vision and deft ability to deliver all of the feels. He finds places to let his bright intellect shine, perfectly crafting heartrending melodrama through tonal pacing that’s never cloying nor disgustingly saccharine.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Courtney Howard
    Lacking spine-tingling dread, taut tension, and the deservingly provocative ending needed to make its modern sentiments land, this re-imagining is less than a classic.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Courtney Howard
    What should have been an awe-filled adventure quickly curdles into an awful one, thanks to a pedestrian formula and the filmmakers’ fixation on fart jokes.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 30 Courtney Howard
    Perhaps the biggest problem with this story is that the filmmakers work from the assumption that the audience instantly cares about these characters. We don’t, especially when we’ve been given no good reason to. As the film’s tagline prophetically declares, “We all have blind spots.” It’s okay to keep this one in yours.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Courtney Howard
    With heartening, encouraging messages that speak to the target audience and beyond, Good Girls Get High doesn’t stray too far from the formula, but manipulates it in such a way that feels fresh.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Courtney Howard
    Its candy-floss-lite sentiments and strong lead performances carry the picture beyond the genre’s limitations. That said, it lacks a sense of uniqueness to set it apart from other female-centric book-to-screen adaptations.

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