Craig D. Lindsey

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For 67 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 22% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 76% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 16.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Craig D. Lindsey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 80 It's Not Yet Dark
Lowest review score: 0 Black Rose
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 67
  2. Negative: 23 out of 67
67 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Craig D. Lindsey
    Although marginally more woke than other Madea installments (the fam has an unexpected response when one of them publicly comes out), Homecoming is just more of the same. The characters are one-note, and the actors portray them that way.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 25 Craig D. Lindsey
    Blacklight cuts corners everywhere.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Craig D. Lindsey
    The filmmaker, who also co-edited The Novice, depicts Alex’s freshman year in quick-cutting, frenetic, anxiety-ridden fashion, with composer Alex Weston’s string-heavy score properly ratcheting up the tension and Fuhrman gamely acting like a harried but dedicated ball of nerves.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 58 Craig D. Lindsey
    As for the story itself, it often moves with a moody, morbid vagueness that makes the film seem like a Gothic ghost story, except that everyone’s alive.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    Straight-faced and suspenseful at first, wacky and almost randomly nihilistic afterwards, South Of Heaven just doesn’t know what it wants to be.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    As hellaciously predictable and preposterous as Sweet Girl is, it could win over viewers nursing their own grudge against Big Pharma. Mainly, though, this is a vehicle for its star, that brawny softie Momoa.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 10 Craig D. Lindsey
    I’ll be straight with you: This movie is awful. And not the fascinating, Alexander Nevsky (the action star/filmmaker, not the 13th-century prince) kind of awful — it’s the does-anybody-involved-know-what-the-hell-they’re-doing kind of awful.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    Sure, it’s kind of entertaining to see the studly, studious Mortensen slap on a few pounds and go way out with the fuggeddaboutit talk as he tries to shoot the shit with Ali’s pedantic, closeted virtuoso. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen him ham it up. But the leads mostly are saddled with literal, middle-of-the-road material.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Craig D. Lindsey
    While the movie does address white people’s thorny relationship with rap and cultural appropriation, it demonstrates how delicate satirizing that can be when it gets kind of serious near the end — a long, long end — and suggests that being the best at battle rap can also mean being the worst.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Craig D. Lindsey
    The movie lays on the melodrama too thick.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Craig D. Lindsey
    Knuckleball mostly fills up its running time by being a twisted, even more ridiculous Home Alone.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 30 Craig D. Lindsey
    There’s something oddly fascinating (and — dare I say it! — watchable) about a movie being this defiantly dumb. I never thought I’d say this, but this guy could give Tommy Wiseau a run for his money in the best worst filmmaker department.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Craig D. Lindsey
    It’s downright sad watching Willis go all half-assed in another movie. I guess we’re gonna have to wait for Glass to come out next year to see if Willis can do a movie in whole-assed form again.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Craig D. Lindsey
    From the characters to the purposely perplexing plot, it’s all hollow and artificial to the point of being downright grating. Blue Iguana is another exercise in sarcastic, self-referential, postmodern pulp whose time has so come and gone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Craig D. Lindsey
    All through the film, you pray it doesn’t go down the bleak routes that films like this usually go — and, most of the time, it does. Night Comes On is an assured first shot from Spiro but, damn, I couldn’t wait for this fucking thing to be over.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Craig D. Lindsey
    No Date, No Signature presents a story of flawed but generally decent people trying to put right what went so horribly wrong.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    Unfortunately, the narrative focus constantly shifts and never coalesces.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 0 Craig D. Lindsey
    China Salesman has got to be one of the most baffling, expensive pats on the back China has ever given itself.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Craig D. Lindsey
    For all its pulpy, genre-movie intentions, SuperFly is virtually crippled by its own ludicrousness. It incites more giggles than gasps.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Craig D. Lindsey
    While it’s obvious Allred wanted to make a possibly autobiographical, blatantly meta take on how insane young adults get when they fall in love, The Texture of Falling ends up being one baffling, infuriatingly pretentious exercise in indie filmmaking.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Craig D. Lindsey
    This movie is just a stockpiled compendium of terrible decisions, both behind and in front of the camera.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Craig D. Lindsey
    Overboard is a manipulative mindfuck dressed up as a lightweight, heartwarming comedy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Craig D. Lindsey
    Boom makes the case that the scene Basquiat came from was more fascinating than Basquiat himself. Even though many of the artists, admirers, and friends interviewed for this doc praise him and his gonzo genius, several of them suggest that he strived to be more of a rock star than a punk artist.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Craig D. Lindsey
    What this tiresome, out-of-pocket-ass movie actually does is create a painfully kooky, mad world where the only good thing about it is that Rosario Dawson can still turn men into idiots with her presence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Craig D. Lindsey
    I guess that’s ultimately what Reed and Gunn wanted to provide: a view of African Americans that’s messy, complicated, dramatic, and, most important, honest. It’s also a fascinating artifact of black people getting together and making their own art — mainly because they wanted to see themselves properly represented onscreen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    What We Started is a cute roundup of how EDM came to be, but much like the DJs it shines a light on, it only scratches the surface.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    As sleek and polished as Us and Them looks, it finds Martin not only biting from more established filmmakers, but biting off more than he can chew.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Craig D. Lindsey
    Unfortunately, this movie has so many damn things percolating all through it that it ultimately seems unfocused and painfully earnest.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Craig D. Lindsey
    The filmmakers do an effective job at making a clever horror show out of postpartum depression. So it’s a shame the movie goes off the deep end in the final act, as the story literally comes to a bloody, tragic finish.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Craig D. Lindsey
    Even though The Cured doesn’t quite excel at being both terrifying and thought-provoking, at least it gave Juno the opportunity to become a horror hero.

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