For 32 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dan Fainaru's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Jafar Panahi's Taxi
Lowest review score: 50 Sweet Bean
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 32
  2. Negative: 0 out of 32
32 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Ceylan’s script reveals a stagnating provincial world, characters all handling their thwarted hopes and inevitable resignations in their own way.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    The Workshop conveys a stunningly authentic portrait of French youth today; their class, racial and occupational concerns.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Authenticity rules the day here, the contrast between the banality of daily existence and extreme conduct is the main point of the picture, all of it defined by an insistence on staying close to the actual events and refraining from any attempt at psychological observations or analytical motivations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Maurery handles her character, a nasty piece of work to be sure, with such natural aplomb that she makes Mrs Drazdechova not only perfectly credible but pretty scary too.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Dan Fainaru
    This is a loving tribute not only to the late Barbara (1930-97), the inimitable singing icon of the French chanson, but also to the star of this film, Jeanne Balibar, whose brilliant performance is boosted here by her uncanny physical resemblance to the late“Dame en noir”, as Barbara used to be called by her admirers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Faithful to his title, Andrey Zvyagintsev (Leviathan) deivers a cruel, desolate, unforgiving image of Russia’s new middle class, ruled by selfishness, greed, frustration, envy, anger and anxiety in Loveless.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    It may not qualify as a movie entertainment in the full sense of the word, but it is most certainly an edifying picture of social stagnation at its saddest.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    The film still stands as an imposing monument to the memory of a great artist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Dan Fainaru
    It is pleasant to watch, needs a much stronger structure to hold it together.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Dan Fainaru
    Judith Chemla is a perfect choice for the lead.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    As economical in his visual style as he is with his dialogue, Kaurismaki makes the most out of having his actors do the least.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Dan Fainaru
    Open-minded audiences will discover a surprisingly refreshing, smart, intelligent and often entertaining, tongue-in-cheek take on the nature of family bonds, using references from the Old and the New Testament, with modern characters nicely fitting the mythical moulds without suspecting there is anything even remotely symbolical or divine about their existence.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Dan Fainaru
    Faucon, obviously very fond of all his characters, carefully avoids the patterns that many genre films fall into.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Leyla Bouzid’s fiercely committed debut should draw plenty of attention not only for the way it deals with the political climate in her homeland but also for how she charts the painful transition of her lead character from outspoken, rebellious adolescence to a more careful and often resigned adulthood.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Dan Fainaru
    Seydoux never manages to assemble all of Celestine’s various features into one convincing character, while the social, sexual and political nuances in the script are well-established clichés.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    those who aren’t put off by the extensive subtitling will find themselves swept away by this family reunion which offers not only a masterful portrait of the contemporary Romanian middle-class but also a whole set of smart, perceptive reflections on the relativity of truth, on the failings of memory, the interpretation of history, the significance of religion and much more.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Dan Fainaru
    If there is a star in this show, it is certainly cinematographer Nathalie Moliavko-Visotzky whose work stands out as the one perfectly valid reason to watch this film.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Dan Fainaru
    The clichés start to arrive in rapid succession. Even the most moving performances cannot disguise their obviousness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Dan Fainaru
    While shunning all the heroic pyrotechnics associated with this genre, [Lindholm] lays bare the moral and ethical dilemmas his main character, and many like him, have to face, raising questions that have no immediate or available answer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Dan Fainaru
    Less like a drama than a statement, Chevalier’s characters do not grow but diminish. None of Attenberg’s charming insouciance is in evidence here although she never defines any of her victims too precisely, she is blunt and even cruel at times.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dan Fainaru
    One thing missing in Pablo Larrain’s new movie is a touch of Luis Bunuel. Without it, the fierce sarcastic attack he launches against the Catholic Church looks a little too much like a self-motivated settling of accounts, terribly angry and lacking a perspective that would put it all into the right context.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Dan Fainaru
    More like the testimony of an enthusiastic, fully committed supporter watching, in close-up, a populatoon reclaiming its rights, Afineevsky’s film accepts as a basic premise that Yanukevych is the villain. Anyone who differs should look elsewhere.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Through both parts, and this is Bellocchio’s admirable achievement, he has life itself impetuously claiming its rights.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    Office is first and foremost about enjoying cinema’s capacity to entertain and have fun, which Johnnie To certainly seems to have had himself in making it.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Dan Fainaru
    This is a delightful surprise, and though it is even more minimalistic than his last two illegal exports, This Is Not A film and Closed Curtains, it is also more mature, and better calibrated and - at the risk of annoying art house patrons who often hate this term - more entertaining than the other two.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    Touching, funny, perceptive and simple enough to carry large audiences, The Second Mother is carried throughout by a hilarious, intelligent and soulful performance from veteran Brazilian actress, comedian and TV host Regina Case, surrounded by a solid supporting cast.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Dan Fainaru
    Using his characters as pawns on the chessboard of history, Mountains May Depart culminates in a nostalgic future where the Chinese look back for the identity they have lost.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dan Fainaru
    Kore-Eda’s film is more than the beautifully luminous faces of his actresses, the particular way they move and speak, or the lovely landscapes of Kamakura, even though all of these should be admired. So much more lies buried in-between the lines.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    Richly detailed, sensitively played and cleverly mounted.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Dan Fainaru
    Though it is all about mourning and loss, Maoz’ script reaches way beyond, unveiling in each one of his leading characters deep layers of past guilt that might have never been revealed in normal circumstances.

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