Danette Chavez

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For 167 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Danette Chavez's Scores

Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Legion: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Insatiable: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 167
167 tv reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Danette Chavez
    Sheridan and his writers deal so much in shades of gray and blurred lines that it becomes impossible to make out any of the larger themes.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Danette Chavez
    Steinfeld is reliably magnetic and radiates great confidence. ... The series tries to underscore a connection that’s much more tenuous here than it was in season two, when both Emily and Henry were wrestling with the need to be published. This is one of the few instances this season where the show overplays its hand, but Dickinson easily makes up for it with trenchant commentary on the limits of allyship.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    “The Five-Foot Fence” wasn’t a riotously funny premiere for the show, but it did excel at putting Larry through the wringer.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Dopesick is not an easy watch, and despite its subject matter, it sometimes struggles to establish itself as a necessary one. But when it does choose substance over gimmicky style, you won’t be able to look away.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    You’ll need the investigative skills of Cappello or Morantz to keep up with all the story threads that are scattered across the first three episodes; there are so many time jumps and new players introduced.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    It’s a well-balanced show with an endearing lead performance and a whole roster of equally charming supporting players, all of whom get standout moments or spotlight episodes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    It’s one of the stronger reimaginings to come from Disney+’s mining of nostalgia, which has so far yielded earnest sequel series like The Mighty Ducks: Game Changers and lackluster fare like Turner & Hooch. ... Lee is a prepossessing performer, nailing the broader comedic beats along with the (rarer) moments of pathos. ... The rest of the ensemble isn’t as developed in the first two episodes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    Only Murders In The Building engenders curiosity, first and foremost, whether it’s about your neighbors, what’s in the cultural zeitgeist (be it a podcast or the latest murder mystery show), or why someone might keep others at arm’s length. If you find personal revelations as thrilling as the resolution of a crime, it could even become your next TV obsession.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    Reservation Dogs is making important strides, not least of which is being one of the best new shows of the year.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 42 Danette Chavez
    The lack of a clear objective also leaves the cast, including Peck, looking lost, though that may be a result of the choppy editing and strange blocking, which often gives the impression that the dog isn’t in the scene with his human counterparts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Each disguise, exaggerated accent, and gadget serves a purpose. It’s undoubtedly a formula, but one that continues to work, thanks in great part to a spirited cast that acts like a found family, on and offscreen.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Danette Chavez
    Shahi’s performance is one of the few things to recommend the show. As the scripts send Billie through an emotional maelstrom, she radiates lust, confusion, motherly affection, and determination. She’s game and vulnerable, even as the show’s repetitiveness strains patience. But Sex/Life isn’t all that invested in her character, either.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 42 Danette Chavez
    There’s a hesitation here that’s absent in the rest of Murphy’s work—and say what you will about his recent output, this was hardly the time to be restrained. By its end, including a typed coda that deflates the swell of emotion that immediately precedes it, Halston still looks like a sketch of what’s to come instead of a head-turning creation.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Danette Chavez
    A slack, derivative story with flat visuals and action. It’s a show so utterly disinterested in its present that it wallows in the past for lengthy stretches of each of its eight episodes, and then bets everything on the final moments of its season finale.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Shadow And Bone is an engrossing experience, if not an especially novel one. The series plays a bit with our expectations of the genre, including the makings of a hero and of redemption. But even when we can see the turn, it’s no less riveting. That might be its greatest trick.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Danette Chavez
    What makes A Black Lady Sketch Show’s many deft turns possible is its wonderfully versatile performers, who can embody the righteous and the ridiculous, often at the same time. Each actor finds her own groove, too.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 42 Danette Chavez
    It’s both too much and not enough, just like Dad Stop Embarrassing Me! is ultimately both too self-aware and oblivious. The series doesn’t trust its laugh track to flag the jokes for viewers; it extends the gags or finds some other way to double down. Likewise, what social commentary can be found in Dad Stop Embarrassing Me! is underscored but ultimately inadequate.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    Gangs Of London is populated with compelling characters and stories, including the interconnected history of the Wallace and Dumani families.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    There is a whole season ahead, of course, one that seems to be setting up a longer game of cat-and-mouse than we’re used to seeing in the Law & Order universe. Anything can happen as Elliot tries to bring his wife’s killers to justice.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Milioti brings such definition to Hazel that we never lose sight of her even when the writers’ chicanery throws her and the viewer for another loop.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    As in seasons past, this overabundance of plot threatens to overtake characterization. ... Season three does find compellingly quiet moments in all this bluster. ... But even as certain beats are hit again, James works to distinguish the story he’s telling in season three from the one he first brought to FX with Sutter. The players may be the same, but they have greater resonance now.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Hess and Measom don’t editorialize or otherwise insert themselves into the production, beyond posing a question that shakes one of the more ostentatious interviewees late in the series. Aside from one giddily quirky mid-series sequence, they also don’t bring much character to the format, which is surprising, given the directors’ previous work.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Although its imagination occasionally stalls, the second season of For All Mankind eventually comes together to offer a thrilling journey through sci-fi drama.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Danette Chavez
    Pags feels more like a person instead of a character outline. Unfortunately, these moments are too far and few between for Pags and his buddies, who all suffer from limited depictions. Mikey mostly struts, Tammy pines, and Stacey only pivots between sullen and annoyed. Jimmy and Jill have the exact same conversation about their relationship, whether it’s on the phone or in person. And through it all, there’s very little sense of why any of these friendships began in the first place.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    Both its fantasy and romance are too weighted down in season two; in its dedication to recreating the historical setting of Elizabethan London, the series loses some of its magic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    Dickinson season two is just as searching as its subject, and nearly as eloquent.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    It’s an engrossing, somewhat weightless throwback, but one that hearkens back to USA’s “Characters Welcome” motto rather than Alfred Hitchcock Presents.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    The reboot strives for the same mix of satire and silliness, but the balance is off in the five episodes (of 13) screened for critics. Just as in the original, nothing is off limits for sending up, but this reboot is fairly itching for a fight. Pinky and the Brain, the only other Animaniacs characters to return (sorry, no Chicken Boo), end up mired in a toothless social media riff and some election satire. ... When Animaniacs remembers to have fun, it makes for lively, occasionally impressive, viewing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Things move quickly in the first four episodes, and rarely ever let up throughout the eight-episode first season. ... What ultimately works against the series is the fact its biggest mystery is actually its lead character. Farrant’s is an agreeable presence, and the actor ably vacillates from conflicted teen to clever budding spy. But Alex Rider raises so many questions about its eponymous secret agent, only to defer them for answering at a future date.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    A Teacher lingers a little too long in this pre-catastrophe phase, which is surprising, given how economical Fidell is otherwise in her storytelling. ... The pensive latter episodes are the fallout, and at the center is Eric, who always had more to lose. They’ve switched places, or perhaps are finally seeing themselves for the first time. A Teacher’s lessons are all the more devastating for appearing incomplete.

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