Danette Chavez

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For 140 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Danette Chavez's Scores

Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Russian Doll: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Insatiable: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 140
140 tv reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    The reboot strives for the same mix of satire and silliness, but the balance is off in the five episodes (of 13) screened for critics. Just as in the original, nothing is off limits for sending up, but this reboot is fairly itching for a fight. Pinky and the Brain, the only other Animaniacs characters to return (sorry, no Chicken Boo), end up mired in a toothless social media riff and some election satire. ... When Animaniacs remembers to have fun, it makes for lively, occasionally impressive, viewing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Things move quickly in the first four episodes, and rarely ever let up throughout the eight-episode first season. ... What ultimately works against the series is the fact its biggest mystery is actually its lead character. Farrant’s is an agreeable presence, and the actor ably vacillates from conflicted teen to clever budding spy. But Alex Rider raises so many questions about its eponymous secret agent, only to defer them for answering at a future date.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    A Teacher lingers a little too long in this pre-catastrophe phase, which is surprising, given how economical Fidell is otherwise in her storytelling. ... The pensive latter episodes are the fallout, and at the center is Eric, who always had more to lose. They’ve switched places, or perhaps are finally seeing themselves for the first time. A Teacher’s lessons are all the more devastating for appearing incomplete.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    There are moments of genuine insight about how much said workplace has changed, from the make-up of employees to rise-and-grind culture to mixed messages from executives about “slowing down” while also “not letting up.” They’re too far and few between the bacchanalian scenes and familiar storytelling beats about succeeding at all cost, which sets Industry squarely in mid-cap territory.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Even when the premise feels overly familiar in the wake of similar comedies (to say nothing of all the recent space-race dramas), Heidecker, Reilly, and Armisen generate enough oddball chemistry to power a remote lunar base.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    The Queen’s Gambit is actually aware that its protagonist can occasionally be a jerk. For all the assured direction and exotic locales—including a jaunt to Paris—Beth’s internal journey is the most captivating element of The Queen’s Gambit. The series may border on wish fulfillment at times, but at least it casts a spell.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    The setting and performances make for a solid period drama, but after the premieres of The First and For All Mankind, as well as the releases of First Man and Ad Astra, The Right Stuff looks more like an imitator than the originator, despite its groundbreaking source material.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Fargo occasionally strains under the weight of what it’s attempting to accomplish: a lively examination of the history of different groups of Western European immigrants who have gradually been granted whiteness, and the many Black Americans, whose ancestors were brought here by force (and greed), but are now, as Doctor Senator puts it, a “part of this land, like the wind and the dirt.”
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    All six hours of their docuseries overflow with information, from the personal stories of detainees—people like Josué, who migrated with his 3-year-old son, only to be separated by border patrol agents in El Paso, Texas—to data about the exponential growth of ICE and the history of immigration as a wedge issue in politics.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    These movies work as charming follow-ups to the series and as pick-me-ups during a summer that’s basically been postponed. Lassie Come Home goes a step further, opening up a poignant new chapter for these characters and performers.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    The show only begins to break away from its inspirations in its final hour, when storytellers and characters alike begin to wonder if they can’t choose something else, something more. Until then, Brave New World is caught in a feedback loop of references, one that only occasionally resonates with a culture in the midst of challenging systems, unseen and otherwise.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Danette Chavez
    By the end of the eight episodes screened for critics (out of the full season’s 10), the only indicators of Darby’s growth are material ones: better clothes, accessories, and apartments.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    McNamara could have drilled down on the parallels to contemporary world leaders, but The Great’s humor and observations are sharper in their timelessness. Like Catherine, The Great succeeds because it knows when to keep some things to itself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Though many of its 1,001 cars are cast in a familiar mold, Snowpiercer still manages to find new ways to interrogate power structures, as well as build up steam—or rather, power the eternal engine—for a second season of quietly compelling stories. Its style might not match its ambition, but after an arduous trek, Snowpiercer mostly proves to be worth the wait.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    While The Eddy takes place in a Paris neighborhood you don’t see on postcards, its structure and themes will feel immediately familiar. ... Recognizing the beat doesn’t make The Eddy less moving, but it does keep an impeccably made series from being something more groundbreaking.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    The story never lingers long enough at home for the family drama to really take hold. ... The result is a story that feels both overstuffed and underdeveloped. Like its namesake, Defending Jacob is brought down just as it’s taking off.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    The late-season developments have the unintended effect of absolving Ruby and Billy of their responsibility, which robs Run of its earlier potency. Like its protagonists, Run makes regrettable choices; hopefully, the show will also have a chance to course-correct in its final two episodes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    ODAAT nailed the balance between long-form and episodic storytelling in its first season, and manages to keep it up in the move to a more traditional outlet.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 42 Danette Chavez
    The season midpoint does little to clarify the medical cases from the murder mysteries and political intrigue, and confusion reigns over the ending. Even the question of Freud’s capabilities as a psychiatrist/psychoanalyst remains unresolved. You could argue that the series offers subtle commentary on the elevation of mediocre men to mythical status, but sometimes, a poorly executed vision is just a poorly executed vision.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Garland hasn’t overlooked a thing in constructing the setting of his techno thriller. It’s the story within it that struggles to be cohesive and compelling.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    The interclass, intergenerational tensions quickly boil over in the first two episodes before being reduced to a simmer for much of the rest of the season. Gentefied then moves into slice-of-life portraiture, fleshing out the cousins’ backstories and offering insight into patrons. ... This expansion provides some sweet and funny moments, though it takes far too long to take Ana’s mom Beatriz (Laura Patalano, also from the original series) from one-note harridan to multi-faceted human being.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Sodroski and Dinner’s conscientiousness produces the kind of episodes that viewers should have to sit with before moving on to the next one, in part because they challenge expectations of what comes next—if only they had the time.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    What season two of this delightfully absurd anthology series proves is that there’s no need for miracles in the Dark Ages when we have each other.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    Together, these stories make for one of the most rousing installments in the franchise, and potentially one of the most powerful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Danette Chavez
    Curb Your Enthusiasm has hit on several of the biggest developments that have cropped up since it last premiered. Where any of this is going is anyone’s guess, including David & co.’s, I’d wager. But I will always hem and haw over niceties, so Curb still has my attention... for now.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Danette Chavez
    There’s a greater focus on teen angst and rites of passage in Party Of Five than overt social commentary, which can feel more groundbreaking and political than its real-life allusions.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    There is some forward momentum with the overarching plot about how humanity’s last stand is built on stolen alien technology, but not enough to make the new season look like something more than a smoother series launch. You won’t get lost in Lost In Space, but the family-friendly adventures of the Robinsons will still make for solid viewing over the holiday break.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Danette Chavez
    More than anything, Joke Show reminds us that the personal is political. ... Joke Show is great stand-up from a great comedian who knows there’s life—and comedy—after Trump.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Danette Chavez
    Aside from its marquee host, TWATJG could be any of a number of the mostly bland, curiosity-stoking series that make up National Geographic’s schedule (which makes sense, given that it’s produced by National Geographic Studios and Nutopia).
    • 37 Metascore
    • 42 Danette Chavez
    This mix of influences and eras is ultimately more confusing than it is cohesive. The verdant background offers a compelling counterpoint to most dystopias, which often imagine either a sterile, skyscraper-filled world or a desolate wasteland. But there are so many other standard dystopian ideas at play here as to rob that decision of its novelty.

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