For 273 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave Calhoun's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Death of Mr. Lazarescu
Lowest review score: 20 Only God Forgives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 273
273 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    This is a smart, meaningful first film, with nods all over the place to classics like The Shining and Rosemary’s Baby, as well as more recent obvious touch points like Get Out. It’s not all subtle, but then neither is prejudice.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This film is about wonder, not balance, and it turns us delirious in the white heat of this pair’s chaotic, unflinching passion.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Only Pedro Almodóvar could wrap a cry of pain about Spain’s inability to come to terms with its recent dark history into a gorgeous-looking melodrama about two mothers drawn by fate into a complicated, painful and ultimately nourishing relationship.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    What unites the interlocking stories are their flashes of love and longing – often painfully, tragically unreturned. The film’s emotional side is well-handled, helped by strong performances across the board. But it’s the storytelling puzzle – the pile-up of different perspectives and gradual reveal of the facts – that makes it most worthwhile.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a visual feast that’s served with enormous respect for the essence of Shakespeare’s words, even though Coen has shaved the text so that it moves at a furious pace, with a sudden slap of an ending that feels entirely fitting. It’s a creepy, bone-shaking triumph.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a film that oozes clear-eyed empathy and has the lived-in feel of a story, director and cast working in strong harmony.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Although Binoche is the film’s star, her presence is smartly muted, allowing us time and space to discover the world as she does, and providing room for complexity in considering the ethics of his character’s work and of Carrère’s film itself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a superb morality play that immerses us deeply in a society’s values and rituals and keeps us guessing right to its powerful final shot.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The performances, the writing and the direction all conspire to make it feel fresh and specific, and as bleak as the settings may be, it has a delicious black comic streak and shares the buzz of personal re-awakening without ever feeling obvious or cheap. It turns out to be a beacon of warmth amid a frozen wasteland.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    Treat Benedetta as a pile-up of shallow pleasures undercut with a sardonic wink and some fairly obvious comments on power and corruption, and there’s fun to be had. Look for any deeper logic and you’ll be disappointed.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    It’s all mildly involving, in a soapy way, and there are performances and moments to enjoy (and then to miss when they're under-developed), but thematically it’s muddy: you’re left with a hollow feeling that all the pain and recovery on display over this ten-year-period amounts to little in the way of ideas.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a simple, angry work, determined to get across its point with force and with few distractions.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Cow
    There’s nothing cloying or corny about the way Arnold depicts these beasts. What she gives us is a straightforward slice of a cow’s relentless life of muck, milk, breeding and feeding.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    This is a story about the importance of making mistakes, of learning, of pulling yourself up and trying again – whether in love, sex, art or friendship. It’s a delirious ‘making of’ film: the making of an artist and the making of a life in all its messy glory.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s such a loopy endeavour overall that Annette will likely have some audiences running from it screaming as much as it will have others worshipping at its altar. It’s a hard film to adore, but an easy one to thank for its very existence.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s a daring spin on history and the power, or otherwise, of the individual: a puzzle that is well worth trying to solve.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film offers little relief to the nerves, but it’s a surprising, curious drama, consistently thoughtful, artful and provocative.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    It’s not wildly original, but it’s steely and stylish, and as a story it has a ruthless streak to it that’s weirdly appealing.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s smaller in scale than his last two, 2014’s A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence and 2007’s You, the Living. It also has a more maudlin air to it overall than those others – which, if you’ve experienced their bleak absurdity, you’ll know is saying something.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It’s uncompromising. It’s disturbing. But it’s also deeply human, allowing for many glimpses of human kindness and human frailty beyond a wall of anonymity and pain.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    Politics, music, fashion, history, religion – this is one of those super-smart cultural documentaries that has entry points from all sides, but one thing’s for sure: this magical, essential event is forgotten no more.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    The story passes from summer to winter, seasonally and tonally, and Hall’s chief allies in bringing her smart script to screen are Edu Grau’s stunning black-and-white photography (reason alone to see the film), Dev Hynes’s piano jazz score and two extraordinarily thoughtful central performances from Negga and Thompson.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Dave Calhoun
    The result is a soil-under-the-fingernails, forest-bound mindmelter – with bonus pagan chills.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    This captivating adaptation of Aravind Adiga’s 2008 Booker Prize-winning novel, which unfolds among the wild contrasts and contradictions of modern India, offers style, energy and bursts of goofy fish-out-of-water humour before landing on a vicious, dark streak of black-hearted cynicism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    It wins you over with its scrappy underdog antics and then, later, bowls you over with its heavyweight insights.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Dave Calhoun
    There are rousing landscape shots, a fair amount of bone-crunching, and a dash of brooding patriotism – and a welcome attempt to look at history from the view of ordinary folk – but the storytelling is downbeat and basic.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    The film is a beguiling window into a distant world – one that at times evokes such claustrophobia as to feel more like a peephole.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    Young Ahmed might not have answers, but it asks pertinent questions and makes acute observations. Its ending is hopeful, yet open. It’s a wise and sensitive contribution to a timely debate.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Dave Calhoun
    What’s different is the detail with which Loach and his collaborators examine the effects of work and society on the nuclear family.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Dave Calhoun
    It’s deeply romantic and also deeply thoughtful – an electric combination.

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