For 67 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 85% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 13% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 10.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Dave White's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 76
Highest review score: 95 Shoah: Four Sisters
Lowest review score: 30 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 56 out of 67
  2. Negative: 2 out of 67
67 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    It is by turns scatological, hilarious, art-referential and, ultimately, moving.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    The result is one of Hong’s most emotionally generous films. In a career full of small triumphs, it’s a beautiful gesture of family love, of non-specific spiritual awakening, and self-possession meant to create outward waves of goodness.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    Panahi and cinematographer Amin Jafari take familiar tropes of contemporary Iranian cinema and rework them with refreshing twists.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Dave White
    [A] brash, bruising comedy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    A thrilling, sprawling sensory overload that simultaneously enchants and overwhelms.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Dave White
    Content with dipping its toe into a social issue without risking much, what’s most revealing in The Jesus Music is what’s left out.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    Formally, Tsai’s approach is as spare as possible while still maintaining a loose sense of narrative.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    For Dupieux, there seems to be no moral here at all, other than perhaps that life is a trajectory of mishaps and easiest for people who don’t linger over the fallout of their actions. This isn’t necessarily surprising for a filmmaker who once wrote and directed a movie about a sentient tire that commits serial murder.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Dave White
    Undine allows for the magical while keeping its eyes firmly on the painfully real, making a valiant, full-hearted attempt to break the bonds of history.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 95 Dave White
    By centering the real-life experiences of his actors, Costa’s conscientious cinema lives in a fully humane space. Material deprivation and unrelenting night provide a blackened backdrop for quiet intimacy and dignity. Costa rejects voyeurism and condescension in favor of a form of storytelling solidarity with his actors, one where there’s no buffer of irony, no distancing effects.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Dave White
    In spite of an excessive, metaphor-bash of an ending — forgivable when everything else on screen is this frenziedly fun — In Fabric seduces like its bias-cut main character, then taunts you for your desire.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Dave White
    It speaks the language of climbers everywhere, but in the process reduces its very real historical innovators to two peevish regional managers in a sniping session, a dry duel set in the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    This is fan service as painstaking as any Marvel installment, and you’re expected to bring your well-studied knowledge of deep bench characters and all your reserve emotional commitment with you. As a reward for those loyal fans, Downton Abbey offers an envelopment in gorgeous and exacting period detail.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    What Ray & Liz offers is the opposite of exploitive or vengeful enumeration of parental failure. Billingham finds grace for his ruined family, even if he refuses to save them, and it feels like an act of forgiveness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    Halston is at its most naturally energetic when highlighting career triumphs. It’s packed with archival footage remembering past glamour, and moving contemporary interviews with models like Pat Cleveland, whose own ascendance in the fashion world as one of the first African American models to make a name for herself, went hand in hand with Halston’s paradigm shift.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Dave White
    With this determination to eschew simple explanations, to avoid being reductive about the cause and effect of an artist’s work and life, and to remain true to the cloudy circumstances surrounding Pasolini’s murder, comes a troubling directorial decision to turn the man’s death into a symbol — of what is unclear.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    It begins in a lush, green garden, but High Life, the quiet, bracing and ultimately moving first English-language film from acclaimed French director Claire Denis, is the antithesis of a creation story.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    McConaughey dives headfirst into the well here, howling all the way, and his committed performance is one to admire even if it’s not one to like.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Dave White
    The approximately 270-minute running time becomes a hushed demand for the viewer to sit with historical cruelty and listen as its victims teach to the future, its effect a cumulative cry of warning for today.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Dave White
    As a document of a special creation, Maria by Callas is very nearly enough, thanks in no small part to that generous helping of footage where she fulfills that very destiny. It’s a powerful reminder that private walls can stay put when she’s singing Bellini’s “Casta diva,” that the music is more than enough, that we can let the mystery be.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    Tea With the Dames, from director Roger Michell (“Notting Hill”), is as cozy and satisfying as its title suggests.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Dave White
    Subject matter alone makes Pick of the Litter, if not especially memorable, a gently lovable outing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Dave White
    It’s Dyrholm’s performance that anchors everything.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Dave White
    McQueen is formally traditional, and guided by a respectful approach to a complicated man. It’s lovingly told, even as it refuses to gloss over ugliness.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Dave White
    The major problem with Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom — the fifth installment in this dinosaur series, and the second of a prospective trilogy — is that the makers treat the action and suspense sequences in the way most of us go to the dentist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    What Whannell wants most to do is torment and eventually pulverize most of the people in his narrative orbit and make you laugh while he does so.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    It’s a life — and now a film about a life — built from disparate strands of experience, but one that makes sense exactly because she is Grace Jones, and being Grace Jones means synthesizing Grace Jones from all available material.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Dave White
    As handsomely mounted, TV-movie-quality cinema goes, “Light in Darkness” is at once the best looking, most coherent, and least histrionic of the franchise.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 85 Dave White
    This is filmmaking that demands to be noticed, if not always trusted.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Dave White
    A Ciambra is intimate and documentary-like, approaching and then backing away from larger issues of marginalized and immigrant communities, showing rather than preaching, and most importantly, prioritizing Pio’s adolescent face and the way his eyes scrutinize his surroundings as they constantly look for opportunity, weak spots to break through.

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