For 128 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Lewis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Harmonium
Lowest review score: 25 All I See Is You
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 69 out of 128
  2. Negative: 12 out of 128
128 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Director Sameh Zoabi relies on the old adage that we have more in common than not, but it’s a lesson that bears repeating — particularly when laughs come with it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    By the time the credits roll, we don’t achieve a much deeper sense of who John DeLorean really was — only a better understanding of why this complicated figure continues to befuddle screenwriters. DeLorean probably would have preferred it that way.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    A B-movie with a few thrills and plenty of inane dialogue.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 David Lewis
    By the end, we’ve experienced one of the best films about street hustling ever made.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    JT Leroy is on safer ground when Albert and Knoop are matching wits, mainly because it’s a pleasure to watch the perfectly cast Dern and Stewart on the screen. It’s easy to understand what attracted these fine actors to these roles, but the script allows them to only scratch the surface of this maze-of-mirrors story, where the truth remains deliciously elusive.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 David Lewis
    An exquisite tale about coming of age and coming to terms.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    A movie that moves slower than it should and that keeps us detached for long periods of time. Most of the problems can be traced to the script, which does a poor job of establishing the characters and giving us a sense of how they relate to each other.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Obviously a passion project, but Ejiofor keeps his film grounded in reality and avoids histrionics. And even though the plot is predictable from the get-go, the cast in uniformly good, and it’s hard not to be moved when William’s water-pumping invention carries the day. His story is one that’s worth telling.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 David Lewis
    The movie is made even worse with embarrassing flashbacks, painful voiceover, and inane dream sequences. It’s like a Merchant-Ivory film – on Quaaludes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    The script stays on safe, formulaic ground, but it’s effective — and somehow breathes new life into a franchise that had become a junk heap.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    The film is a reasonably entertaining trifle, though it’s overstuffed with battle sequences and peripheral characters that often consume the main story line.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Equally fascinating, sad and scary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    Apocalypse also doesn’t excel in the teen angst department, because the characters are not fleshed out enough. The love triangle is not convincing, and except for Anna and her father, we don’t care a whole lot about what happens to the characters, perhaps because we didn’t get enough time to know them in the beginning.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 David Lewis
    Master director Hirokazu Kore-eda, whose work won the Palm d’Or at Cannes this year, doesn’t pour on the emotion. He doesn’t need to – his film, even as it enchants, is quietly devastating.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Ross doesn’t gloss over the challenges facing the rural black county, but he finds a strong spirit there, even as the storm clouds hover.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Unmistakable political overtones populate the documentary Monrovia, Indiana, an examination of day-to-day life in a small, red-state town.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    Though the ambitious Outlaw King doesn’t always fire on all cylinders, moviegoers deserve this chance to see it on the big screen, before it starts showing on a laptop near you.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 David Lewis
    In a film that should be dripping with drama, there is surprisingly little tension.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    This is a film that wears its anti-tech bent like an old James Bond wristwatch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    This is one of those rare films nowadays that might have been helped with a few extra minutes. Yet at the same time, that’s a clear sign that Hill has created a world and a set of characters that have kept us engaged throughout.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    A character study hiding in cowboys’ clothing — and even if its pacing could use a little more giddy-up, it delivers an inspired ending that makes the brothers’ longish journey worthwhile.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    Assassination Nation won’t get any points for narrative cohesion or character development, but it’s a timely, visually arresting statement about how pandemonium in this country threatens to become the new norm.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 25 David Lewis
    The rambling Life Itself is a multigenerational drama about the messiness of life, but the emotional impact of the movie gets lost in the messiness of its screenplay. And though there is not one subpar acting performance, the film itself comes off as an exercise in self-consciousness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    Throughout the film, we always feel ahead — way ahead — of the narrator, even if the movie does contain a certain sense of dread for Trump detractors, as the inevitability of the election draws closer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    A bit icky yet full of charm, the engaging documentary Rodents of Unusual Size introduces us to the nutria, a furry antihero that’s a cross between a huge rat and a beaver — and that has been damaging Louisiana’s delicate wetlands for decades. The film serves as both an environmental cautionary tale for other states (including California) and an interesting slice of Cajun life.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 David Lewis
    The Nun is certainly not a terrible horror movie – the production values are stellar, and there is a decent backstory about the abbey. But the film won’t be remembered as one of the top entries in the expanding canon of the Conjuring Universe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Even if the proceedings sometime feel like a travelogue, the reconstructions of Gabriel’s last days alive, down to the exact locations and personal interactions, leave a strong impression.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 David Lewis
    Kin
    Kin is not a snoozer, at least, and the Baker brothers are certainly not untalented, but their genre-mashing experiment doesn’t work on any emotional level.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    Even if it’s a film that will challenge any viewer, it benefits from a strong premise, a story line that more or less holds up, and three knockout performances. Rarely has the acting process been explored in such a cinematically provocative way.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 David Lewis
    This is a clever comedy about working-class women, and a sly, entertaining commentary on the insidious effects of gender inequality.

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