For 270 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Sims' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Farewell
Lowest review score: 10 Hillbilly Elegy
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 28 out of 270
270 movie reviews
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Watching the bureaucracy shift from a source of frustration to comfort gives the film its arresting tension.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 15 David Sims
    Everything in Cinderella, admirable as its message may be, is soulless—and that robs it of any joy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    William is a strong character on his own, but he is also a metaphor for America’s struggle to overcome its grimmest failures and to break free from cycles of violence. Schrader understands that those are nigh-impossible tasks; still, he shows the value in trying nonetheless.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Cry Macho is almost like a Western paced at half speed, told with the deliberateness demanded by a 91-year-old movie star. That just helps underline its eulogistic narrative, one in which Mike is already a man out of time, and the more energetic Rafael tries to encourage him to enjoy the last act of his life rather than shuffle through it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    By the end of this new Candyman, little personal investment remains for the audience, just a miasma of provocative thoughts failing to cohere into something greater. The film has enough visual panache to make it an involving watch, but it struggles to live up to the audaciousness of its deeper ideas.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The movie is weird and wrenching, asking the viewer to find humanity within the unreal tale of a puppet child’s rise to fame.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 David Sims
    CODA is insightful and moving enough to be worth all the fuss.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The Suicide Squad is very funny, bleakly self-aware, and shockingly violent—a refreshing mix of familiar conventions and gory satire.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 David Sims
    So what if this movie essentially forgets to have a coherent plot or any real stakes; look at all of the exciting crossovers!
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Pig
    Pig is a blend of absurd cooking melodrama, jokey revenge thriller, and allegory, and Cage is the connective tissue holding all those ridiculous elements together. He may have abandoned the brightest spotlight, but he’s lost none of his edge.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Old
    The central conceit of Old has so much juice, and Shyamalan gets to explore so many fun—if sadistic—avenues over the course of one very long day. It’s his most ambitious work in years, wrapped in the delightful, tawdry packaging of a pulpy thriller.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    The Green Knight is most brilliant in its wordless sequences. Lowery is exceptionally skilled at conjuring otherworldly sights that somehow retain one foot in reality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 David Sims
    Stillwater is a mainstream work that contradicts preconceived notions, and is all the more fascinating for it.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 85 David Sims
    Nomadland is a work of exploration, and not just across the sprawling American West. Fern is exorcising her darkest demons, which spring from the systemic neglect that has been visited on so many Americans in recent years. The odyssey makes Zhao’s film a transfixing mix of reckoning and catharsis.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Minari is a tale that will feel familiar to many, but Chung grounds it in brilliant specificity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 David Sims
    With Judas and the Black Messiah, King has made a thriller that speaks to history without feeling didactic, that keeps the audience in suspense even though the ending was written decades ago.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The clever script, written by Glass herself, is designed to keep the viewer guessing until the very last minute, and it’s the foundation of the first great horror movie of the year.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    Even the most mundane moments in The Little Things aren’t enough to stifle Washington’s star power. Almost nothing is.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 20 David Sims
    While Locked Down is an undoubtedly fascinating pop-culture curio, it’s also sloppy and cringe-inducing, and feels like it was made in a hurry.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 10 David Sims
    Howard’s film is nothing more than a sensational snapshot, one that feels even less authentic than many of the think pieces that followed the release of Vance’s book in 2016. To Hollywood, J. D. is just another cookie-cutter hero, one who’s defeated the haziest of villains—adversity itself.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    The Nest is one of the best films of the year: Though it’s set in the past, it’s about the feeling of one’s own home turning against you when the world outside feels all the more hostile—a theme that resonates far beyond its time period.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 David Sims
    It’s a refreshingly silly and airy adventure focused on the emotions of one character, Wonder Woman (played by Gal Gadot), and a charming end to a tiring year of cinema.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Freaky knows it’s a farce and winks at the silliest of slasher tropes, but that satirical edge doesn’t keep it from being one of the most purely enjoyable horror works I’ve seen in a long time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Fincher didn’t set out to make a movie about today’s politics; he’s telling a universal story about trying to change an industry (and a world) in which every system seems freighted with inertia. Mankiewicz isn’t quite a radical, nor is he especially principled. Still, in trying to make sense of his experiences with Hearst through a Hollywood narrative, he transforms a familiar tale about shattered idealism into a revolutionary work of art.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 65 David Sims
    The movie’s best moments are the fully scripted ones between Borat and Tutar, who have a genuinely sweet bond forged mostly through crude humor. Cohen seems to understand that the film’s shock value is automatically lower because of how deadened audiences have grown to political satire, so he relies more heavily on sitcom jokes to compensate and largely succeeds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    This film is the slightest story Coppola has ever produced; it only brushes up against deeper insights during its brief running time. But the movie offers such a rush of unintentional catharsis and pure diversion that its flaws are easy to forgive.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Chicago 7 is a particularly shiny rendering of history, but Sorkin wisely places the focus on America’s failings, even as he celebrates the people striving to fix them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    The film is not gritty, unvarnished, or hard to watch; it’s an easygoing, charming work, buoyed by Blank’s excellent lead performance and suffused with snappy jokes and sparkling supporting turns.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    76 Days is unvarnished and raw, a first draft of a history that’s still being written.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    The film deploys its extreme imagery for a reason, interrogating notions of selfhood and agency through a plot where nefarious agents can tap directly into someone’s brain.

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