Deborah Young

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For 332 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Deborah Young's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Fireworks Wednesday (2006)
Lowest review score: 30 Broken Sky
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 5 out of 332
332 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The gritty environment and the non-pro cast are convincingly directed by Marlin, a native of Marseille, particularly in the pic's stronger second half.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    It is saved by its underlying theme of forgiveness and reconciliation between long-estranged family members, for whom the cruel memory of the Japanese invasion and occupation of Singapore during World War 2 is still alive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    A long, leisurely drama directed with self-assurance.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    The screenplay struggles to rise above the level of a sociological study into the realm of exciting cinema.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    The filmmakers take a heroic, action-packed, high-tech approach that empties out some of the originality of this unique female heroine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The winking, rather perverse sexual chemistry between the two charismatic lead actresses, who play sisters (though not twins), is one of the film’s main attractions. But Trapero’s ambitious attempt to strike a unique tone somewhere between serious drama and humorous daytime TV falls awkwardly flat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Audiences are likely to be split into love/hate camps over this disturbing film, which is subtle to a fault and features entire third-act scenes whose meaning is not exactly clear.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    Though it’s a series that has seen its day, this swan song should attract genre die-hards with its elegant visuals and some humorously imaginative murders which are the director’s trademark.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    The message tends to melt into a paint-by-numbers screenplay that pushes too many genre buttons to be thoroughly exciting.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    Awkward performances and dialogue undercut interest in the characters so much that none of their raw, fleshy deaths matter a hoot, and by the time the rip-roaring triple ending rolls around, many viewers will have lost count of who’s still standing and who’s food for the birds.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Characters come and go quickly, leaving a feeling that there is too much compression of the multi-episode story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    While its frank approach is refreshing, there is a sense of too much.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    A road movie short on comedy and drama should at least offer a keen level of observation, but here insight is scarce and emotional resonance is faint.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    It has its harrowing moments, but the psychological thriller Jasmine is an impenetrable mystery for most of its running time, and deliberately so.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Deborah Young
    Described by Werner Herzog as “a daydream that doesn’t follow the rules of cinema,” Salt and Fire may be rule-breaking, but the result is one of the director’s least appealing adventures.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    It’s a smart film with engaging moments. But working overtime to build an involving multi-layered drama with a flurry of hand-held camera movements and dizzying flashbacks, it ultimately turns repetitive and annoying.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    An intellectually rigorous but stylistically staid peep at the 20-something author of Capital and The Communist Manifesto, Raoul Peck’s The Young Karl Marx is at once historically impeccable and a filmic disappointment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    It’s a meaty role for stage and film actress Mandat, whose very real pain at the thought of animals’ suffering commands sympathy, though eventually a little tedium. A tighter edit could avoid a lot of surplus emotions and possibly clarify a number of obscure plot points.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The overall feeling is a lot less special than their ground-breaking work that flew with birds and swam with deep-sea creatures.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    It’s all about metaphor and mood, while the storytelling is so lightweight it might not exist. Without it, this drunken boat sailing on poetry can't hold interest for its entire two hour running time.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    All of these ingredients should come together in a mouth-watering finale, but such is not the case; in fact, the film becomes more obvious and less psychological as it goes on.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    The sarcasm of superstar director Feng Xiaogang reduces Chinese bureaucracy, the legal system and government inefficiency to ashes in I Am Not Madame Bovary, but risks doing the same for audiences in a caustic, overlong satire whose coy visual effects overpower the story and characters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Spread over hours of poetic ramblings, the message loses most of its urgency.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    As lovely to look at, relaxing and soporific as the perfect summer day sung by David Bowie at the beginning of the film, Wim Wenders’ The Beautiful Days of Aranjuez scatters some nice ideas amid non-stop French dialogue that only speed readers of subtitles will be able to follow fully.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Though it takes some time to sort out the large cast, the leads, all fine actors, eventually come into focus. As the good and bad samurai, Yakusho and Ichimura have the gravitas to take their roles seriously and perform a decisive one-on-one sword fight straight.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    The taut pacing of the original is a distant memory here. On a positive note, Peter Kam’s fine, ever-present musical comment effectively pumps up the tension even when the screenplay fails, all the way to its final crescendo.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Deborah Young
    Variety and depth of character are badly lacking on the female front, weakening the whole film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    Where Guan excels is in straight dramatization.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    All this is portrayed in such elementary terms it could be the libretto of a 19th century operetta, or maybe a children’s film, were it not so disturbing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Deborah Young
    It feels like every script-reader in the Italian-Swiss-German-Albanian-Kosovo coproduction cut out a line of dialogue in each scene, leaving behind an irritating silence and an enigmatic puzzle for the audience to second-guess.

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