Demetrios Matheou

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For 21 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Demetrios Matheou's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 90 Babi Yar. Context
Lowest review score: 40 Charlie Says
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
21 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Demetrios Matheou
    Loznitsa creates a fascinating and quietly devastating chronicle of invasion, occupation and slaughter. As ever, the Ukrainian director doesn’t labour his film with voiceover or overt authorial steers. Yet this is close to home, and it’s impossible not to feel that he’s holding his country to account; for while this was a Nazi extermination, it came with a degree of collusion.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    Da Silveira sets a tone that nimbly flows between comedy, mystery and discomforting satire (the Pastor generally makes the skin crawl), though her occasional wink towards horror offers fun rather than frights, to the film’s detriment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Demetrios Matheou
    Overall, the film’s treatment of a sensitive scenario lacks subtlety, making for a tough and taxing viewing experience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    Sin
    Dramatically the film can feel a little one-note and overlong. But it stands comparison with Derek Jarman’s Caravaggio as a fascinating portrait of an artist fighting to survive in the cut and thrust of times quite unlike our own.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    The journey is definitely worth making, as both people and places lead Kit slowly towards some sort of rapprochement with his identity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Demetrios Matheou
    Given the recent debates about British identity and the spike in race hatred and racially motivated crime – all as a result of Brexit – the timing of White Riot couldn’t be more apt.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    The debut feature by Belarus-born, US-educated Darya Zhuk may be set in the mid-90s, but with a plot founded on a young Belarussian’s obsessive desire for an American visa, and a sting in the tale that chimes with the #metoo movement, it has a remarkably topical ring to it.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Demetrios Matheou
    Quietly, profoundly moving.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    That the story doesn’t play like a soap, or indeed a Ken Loach film, is down to the director’s technical and narrative approach.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    The downside to the film is Kossakovsky’s feeling that he had to include people in the mix.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Demetrios Matheou
    A dazzlingly dialectical and daring comedy/drama that skilfully brings past and present together and again challenges Jude’s compatriots to face up to the more unsavoury aspects of their history.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Demetrios Matheou
    A love story between shelf stackers in a provincial superstore isn’t the most scintillating pitch. And yet, with the aid of affecting performances and a good eye for the virtuoso moves of a forklift truck, director Thomas Stuber mines the magical in the mundane.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    There’s a freshness to the characterisations, a good eye, and for a time Cronin constructs a tense guessing game as to whether it’s mental breakdown or supernatural forces at play.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Demetrios Matheou
    Never Look Away is an often moving, thoughtful drama about the correlations between personal experience, politics and art.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Demetrios Matheou
    Featuring uncanny and hugely personable performances by Steve Coogan as Stan Laurel, and John C. Reilly as Oliver Hardy, and a smart script by Jeff Pope (Coogan’s co-writer on Philomena) that delivers laughs from both familiar and unexpected quarters, this is a fond, frequently very funny homage to an act that has lost none of its genius.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Demetrios Matheou
    What it lacks in novelty, subtlety or character, it partially makes up in sheer abandon. This is a big, loud, violent, gleefully gory sledgehammer of a film with, crucially, a careful tongue in cheek.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Demetrios Matheou
    After the disappointing martial-monster mash-up of The Great Wall, this represents a return to the majesty and emotional finesse of Hero and House of Flying Daggers.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Demetrios Matheou
    There are far too many secrets and lies for one film, to the extent that what could have been a simmering tale of political complicity, greed and family disorder becomes just winds up feeling a bit silly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Demetrios Matheou
    Unlike Entertainment, which had a cracked energy about it, this has such a somnolent pace, blandly desaturated palette and sombre tone that staying the course can be a challenge.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Demetrios Matheou
    Skimpy psychological insight, a clumsy structure and what turns out to be a miscast Smith all contribute towards what seems like a wasted opportunity.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Demetrios Matheou
    Anyone expecting a progression in Zahler’s work may be disappointed, as the amusingly mannered dialogue starts to feel self-conscious and forced, as does the fatalism.

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