For 127 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 14% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 84% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 17.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Derek Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 46
Highest review score: 88 Night on Earth
Lowest review score: 0 The Last Face
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 37 out of 127
  2. Negative: 63 out of 127
127 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    The film is content to peddle the naïve notion that love is the panacea for all that ails you.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Derek Smith
    Like other gender-swapped films in recent years, The Hustle plays the identity politics game as an end in itself.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film preaches of the love of creative freedom, yet finds no original form of expression of its own.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    What’s self-worth in the 21st century without a dollar amount attached to it, and what value does UglyDolls have if kids aren’t walking out of the theater nagging their parents for toys of their favorite characters?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Derek Smith
    With The Curse of La Llorona, the Conjuring universe has damned itself to an eternal cycle of rinse and repeat.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Derek Smith
    The film plays like a mixtape of various sensibilities, partly beholden to the self-contained form of the bildungsroman; surely it’s no coincidence that a James Joyce poster hangs in the background of one scene.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    Its most amusing moments are in the interplay between the central characters as they adjust to an abruptly shifting reality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    In the end, the film is all too ready to transform into just another shiny pop object indistinguishable from so many others before it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Derek Smith
    The Best of Enemies may be based on a true story, but in so stubbornly turning the spotlight away from Atwater and the radical, grind-it-out community activism that took on the racism that Ellis helped to foster as a segregationist, it more accurately resembles an all-too-familiar Hollywood tall tale.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film’s threads of personal loss and cultural friction are all but lost amid the tawdry romantic entanglements.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film’s tendency to break the “show, don’t tell” directive becomes especially irksome in its homestretch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Derek Smith
    Keith Behrman’s film comprehends the malleable, often inscrutable nature of desire.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    As the film becomes increasingly reliant on predictable narrative tropes, it evolves into the very thing it set out to parody.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Derek Smith
    The film has a raw immediacy that can only be achieved when most cinematic excesses have been eliminated.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Derek Smith
    Joe Cornish’s film is vigilant in its positivity and hope for the future at nearly every turn.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Derek Smith
    Writer-director Joe Chappelle’s An Acceptable Loss is a B movie with a morally urgent message.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film uses the grieving process to lend the proceedings a sense of unearned emotional gravitas.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film becomes overrun by an increasingly preachy and tiresome series of life lessons about race, class, and love.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Derek Smith
    A blatantly telegraphed mid-film twist helps turn Second Act into one of the strangest and most misguided rom-coms of any year.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    For all of its slavish devotion to Mary Poppins, the sequel doesn't even seem to recognize its greatest attribute: its star.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    As effective as director Josie Rourke is at exposing the emotional and physical toll of reigning as queen when exploring Mary and Elizabeth's relationship, her portrait of an endless string of betrayals ends up as simply faceless and impersonal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    On the Basis of Sex is too often busy revering Ruth Bader Ginsburg for her confidence and brilliance to bother with presenting her as a living, breathing human being.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Derek Smith
    While the film’s perception of the politics of the jungle is often profound, the same cannot be said of its take on the human world.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    The film's biggest problem is its inability to lend its clichés and tropes any dramatic thrust or satirical bite.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Derek Smith
    The film Despite its weird flourishes, the film succumbs to the tropes and emotional contrivances of the family melodrama at its core.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film quickly reveals that the only angle it’s interested in is the one that most sympathizes with Gary Hart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Derek Smith
    The film's verité approach risks humanizing Abu Osama, but we eventually gain a complex understanding of the banality of his evil.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Derek Smith
    The film is less hagiographic than most documentaries of its kind, which isn't to say that Tom Volf's adoration of his subject is ever in doubt.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Derek Smith
    The film is a second-rate airport thriller that makes The Hunt for Red October seem like nonfiction by comparison.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Derek Smith
    Relying on such arcane gags as prat falls in knight’s armor, fake French accents, and an array of gadget-based explosions, Johnny English Strikes Again seems almost hellbent on aiming for the lowest common denominator at every turn.

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