Diego Semerene

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For 212 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Semerene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Paraguay Remembered
Lowest review score: 0 Lazy Eye
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 97 out of 212
  2. Negative: 87 out of 212
212 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Zain Al Rafeea's naturalness, however uncanny, only makes the film's maneuverings seem all the more obvious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Director and co-writer Milad Alami's film feels like several fused-together trial drafts of the same narrative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    El Angel‘s greatest accomplishment is in the way it charges the relationships between characters with so much eroticism but never grants us the right to watch desire — other than desire for violence — actually unfold.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film exposes the idea of places as metaphors, mirrors, and symptoms for the people who inhabit them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    Adrian is too flat as a character, his plight too generic, for his tears to count as something other than a sentimental ready-made.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    The Children Act stages the clumsiness of belated domestic confrontations with the very coldness that’s kept its characters from having discussed their emotions for decades and from having had sex for almost a year.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Despite the exuberance of the works featured, which are promptly flattened by the film's commitment to a traditional documentary blueprint, Yayoi Kusama's resilience still commands our attention.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Much more interesting than Jacques and Arthur's relationship is Christophe Honoré's subtle portrait of the early '90s as a time of accelerated mortality and mourning, but also of material encounters of all kinds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Glenn Close's perennial look of astonishment and resilience commands the action to the point of turning every other screen element into a gratuitous prop.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The film's refusal to produce a campy critique feels more like the product of lack of imagination than a purposeful repudiation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    The film is a rebellion of surfaces that never quite reaches, or emanates from, the underpinning roots of its fable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The very act of having kids and demanding perfect conformity from them is never questioned by the film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    As Ian Bonhôte's documentary reveals, Alexander McQueen's suicide was perhaps the all-too-predictable ending to a history of violence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The sexual outbursts in the film are tempered with a tenderness that one hardly associates with Bruce LaBruce's career.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Rüdiger Suchsland’s film is a master class in the relationship between image production and ideology writ large.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    With a tender and respectful gaze, 12 DAYS (@distribfilmsus) sheds light on the relationship between the French state and the mentally ill.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Huppert is such a master of her craft that even the silliest sequences give way to tour-de-force moments.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Rainer Sarnet is as invested in telling a convoluted story that feels rooted in millennia-old folklore as he is in unabashedly experimenting with form and style for the sake of visual pleasure alone.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film is full of astute, and poetically staged, critiques of the parallel worlds resulting from Iran's police state.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Although João Moreira Salles tries to tap into the pleasurable elements inherent to the essayistic as a cinematic form, such as making the merging of intimate and social reality poetically visible, his storylines never quite gel.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    First the film inhabits the eye of a storm—which is to say, the storm of Italy’s wretched peripheries—before submitting to the more ersatz cinematic will of filling Pio’s life with beginnings, middles, and ends.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Damon Cardasis follows a rather didactic approach to his 14-year-old's protagonist's plight in Saturday Church.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Lost, or at least merely glossed over, throughout this hagiographic documentary portrait is the miraculous story of an effeminate Brazilian boy who was actually allowed to blossom through dance and who, because of such permission, has managed to survive his queer childhood a little more unscathed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Childhood in Peter Lataster and Petra Lataster-Czisch's documentary is the terrain of contradiction and ambiguity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Cross-dressing in the story is merely a tool for survival, but such border-crossing is inevitably rife with unintended consequences beyond narrative ones.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The film is an interminable saga full of soap-operatic plot twists involving quickly broken marriages, sexual assault, a secret porn career, terminal illness, and a quasi lesbian love affair.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    If the global reunion that the cruise ship presents here is such a panacea, why is there so much moping?
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Francis Lee captures not only what masculinity does and how it comes undone, but the complex apparatus that keeps it into place: the family’s surveillance, the silence, the shame.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    It begins as a clever pseudo-mumblecore provocation with shades of Bruce LaBruce only to quickly turn into indefensible nonsense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    Michael Roberts's documentary is an unabashed exercise in deifying its subject matter with superlatives and hyperbole from the mouths of talking heads, which ultimately results in the cheapening of the artist.

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