Diego Semerene

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For 251 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Semerene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Beginners
Lowest review score: 0 Day of the Falcon
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 93 out of 251
251 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    While Ulrike Ottinger accesses the most consequential of decades through nostalgia, she does so with humility.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    The documentary exists within the very restricted pantheon of films that successfully reap the cinematic potential of pedagogy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    If the world outside the Supermercado Veran is rife with poverty and crime, we wouldn’t know it from inside this little cocoon.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Lili Horvát’s film delights in wallowing in ambiguity, contradiction, and doubt.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film is at its most moving when it lingers on the face of children who are impotent to return to the world they used to call home.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    When the distance between uncle and niece shortens, Uncle Frank ceases to be a tender portrait of outsider kinship and transforms into a histrionic road movie with screwball intentions.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film reminds us that without investigative reporting there’s no democracy, and that traditional expectations around impartiality and objectivity may be untenable in the face of horror.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Dating Amber rather seamlessly strips itself of its hyperbolic affectations to reveal a heartbreaking story of emancipation through friendship.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Heidi Ewing’s tale of immigration and deportation afflicting the lives of a Mexican gay couple flashes its reason for being at every turn.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Reiner Holzemer’s adulation of his subject feels most credible because he spends a lot of time focusing on the clothes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Redolent of Claude Lanzmann’s approach, Mehrdad Oskouei strips his images to their barest bones as his subjects openly speak about their traumas, as if trying to avoid aestheticizing their pain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Václav Marhoul’s film is at its most magnificent when it lingers on the poetry of its images.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    We are never quite sure of the extent to which situations and dialogues have been scripted and, as such, it’s as though Herzog were more witness than author, more passerby than gawker, simply registering Japan being Japan.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Throughout the film, it’s as if mundane objects hold the remedies for the wretchedness of everyday life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Christophe Honoré deposits all his chips on the comedic premise at the expense of character study and gravitas.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    David France’s most remarkable accomplishment emerges from an aesthetic commitment of a very particular kind.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film grapples with the various shapes that guilt and honor (or lack thereof) might take in a context of state-sanctioned death.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Reciprocity might be impossible in a world rigged against queerness, Tsai seems to say, which doesn’t mean that certain things can't still be shared.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Semerene
    The film is an unending source for the worst possible clichés and most overdone series of graphic matches in the history of film editing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Camera, character, and cameraperson are one throughout, and the effect is exquisitely suffocating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Philippe Garrel illustrates the absurdity behind the myth of the complementary couple with the same cynicism that permeates his previous work but none of the humor or wit.
    • Slant Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    Li Cheng gets much closer to capturing his characters’ predicaments when he trusts the images alone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    With Earth, Nikolaus Geyrhalter’s visual strategy is to wow us with tangibility and data, though he doesn’t give up aesthetic experimentation altogether in this survey of Anthropocene calamities.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Only rarely does Karim Aïnouz allow for loopholes to refreshingly emerge from the film’s stylistic deadlock.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The simplicity of bodies barely moving before a camera that brings their quotidian temporality into a halt is nothing short of a radical proposition in our digital era.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    It’s fascinating to see Benedetta Barzini in academic action, like an ethnographer of the patriarchy herself, bringing back news from its most glamourous yet rotten core.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    Only Marisa Tomei’s face can compete with Isabelle Huppert’s ability to turn even the sappiest of scenarios into a nuanced tour de force.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Erin Derham’s unadventurous aesthetic inoculates her from taxidermy’s subversive spirit.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    The film’s mid-act about-face lends a refreshing sense of complexity to an otherwise superficial depiction of Wrinkles.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film is much more in synchrony with the haziness of its imagery when it preserves the awkwardness between characters, the impossibility for anything other than life’s basic staples to be exchanged.

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