Diego Semerene

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For 266 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Semerene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Miss Kiet's Children
Lowest review score: 0 Day of the Falcon
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 95 out of 266
266 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Cow
    Throughout Andrea Arnold’s film, a kind of affective connection is formed between animal and the cinematic apparatus.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    In Great Freedom, the question of love is refreshingly never too far from bodily intimacy, irrespective of what kind of love that is.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Semerene
    Marry Me plays out as the logical culmination of a multi-hyphenate icon’s indiscriminate commercial voracity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    The film makes no attempt to embody the themes that form the core of Annie Ernaux’s story in its aesthetics.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    For a while, Olivia Colman’s expressive performance carries the film, with little narrative distraction or stylistic conspicuousness.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    For too much of its running time, Panah Panahi’s film is untethered from any kind of captivating narrative purpose.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    The film’s initial aimlessness is pleasurable for the way that it allows the viewer to stare at life being processed on the stunned, confused, and ecstatic face of a teenager.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Pietro Marcello, Francesco Munzi, and Alice Rohrwacher’s documentary rather faithfully captures the spirit of our times.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Unclenching the Fists is a tale of how the desolation of a nation inhabits and engraves a woman’s body.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Unlike the novel, the film ultimately trades its main character’s account of her own suffering for her therapist’s pathologizing assessment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    Though uneven, the film is clever about avoiding age-old conundrums regarding the disavowal of the language of horror.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    At its most accomplished, the film unfolds with a voluptuous slowness and a sense that narrative endpoints are irrelevant.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Against the Current’s style imposes a generic visual language onto a subject who’s anything but generic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    François Ozon’s paean to nostalgia wraps tragedy and obsession in a whimsical bow.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    The film’s tendency to over-explain, over-intellectualize, and over-script events leaves little room for spontaneity and doubt.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    While Ulrike Ottinger accesses the most consequential of decades through nostalgia, she does so with humility.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    The documentary exists within the very restricted pantheon of films that successfully reap the cinematic potential of pedagogy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    If the world outside the Supermercado Veran is rife with poverty and crime, we wouldn’t know it from inside this little cocoon.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Lili Horvát’s film delights in wallowing in ambiguity, contradiction, and doubt.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film is at its most moving when it lingers on the face of children who are impotent to return to the world they used to call home.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    When the distance between uncle and niece shortens, Uncle Frank ceases to be a tender portrait of outsider kinship and transforms into a histrionic road movie with screwball intentions.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film reminds us that without investigative reporting there’s no democracy, and that traditional expectations around impartiality and objectivity may be untenable in the face of horror.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Dating Amber rather seamlessly strips itself of its hyperbolic affectations to reveal a heartbreaking story of emancipation through friendship.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Heidi Ewing’s tale of immigration and deportation afflicting the lives of a Mexican gay couple flashes its reason for being at every turn.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Reiner Holzemer’s adulation of his subject feels most credible because he spends a lot of time focusing on the clothes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Redolent of Claude Lanzmann’s approach, Mehrdad Oskouei strips his images to their barest bones as his subjects openly speak about their traumas, as if trying to avoid aestheticizing their pain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Václav Marhoul’s film is at its most magnificent when it lingers on the poetry of its images.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    We are never quite sure of the extent to which situations and dialogues have been scripted and, as such, it’s as though Herzog were more witness than author, more passerby than gawker, simply registering Japan being Japan.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Throughout the film, it’s as if mundane objects hold the remedies for the wretchedness of everyday life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Christophe Honoré deposits all his chips on the comedic premise at the expense of character study and gravitas.

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